Tag Archives: Trendsetters

Woman in a wheelchair being interviewed on a camera.

Become a young campaigner

The Trailblazers have been very successful in highlighting the issues which affect young disabled adults, including access to higher education, employment and improved transport. Recently Sulaiman Khan the London Ambassador for the Trailblazers came to talk to staff at Scope about the successful campaigning activity he has been involved with.

I delivered the first training sessions on campaigns and advocacy to the Trailblazers and have followed their progress over the years with great interest.

I recently attended a Trendsetters workshop and was inspired by meeting the Trendsetters and hearing what they had to say. This got me thinking that Trendsetters could be campaigners too!

We’d like to offer training to younger disabled people in their teens to help them build up their campaigning skills so that their voices may be heard in their communities.To achieve this the Community Campaigns Team will be holding training sessions in London over the coming months.

These first sessions will be held in London but we will be delivering a similar programme later in the year in other parts of the country.

The training sessions will give you the chance to learn new skills and tools and to hear from other people who have been able to make life better for disabled people and others in their community.

The events will be held from 10.30 – 3.30 on the following dates:

Saturday 26 April
Saturday 10 May
Saturday 24 May
Saturday 7 June

Address:
Scope
6 Market Road
London
N7 9PW

If you’re a young disabled person aged 10 to 18 and you  want to change people’s attitudes towards disability and improve the way disabled people can get involved in the life of your community, please come along.

The events are free to attend and we will provide you with lunch and cover the cost of your transport.

To find out more about how you can take part and book your place please email YourCampaigns@Scope.org.uk or phone me, Rosemary Frazer, on 0207 619 7718.

I was bullied because I’m disabled – part 2

Trendsetters is Scope’s project for young disabled people. In November we posted a blog and video about being bullied because you’re disabled.

We caught up with the Trendsetter who made the video to find out how things are going now.

Your film has had around 9,000 views so far. How do you feel about this?

It amazes me that we’ve had over 9,000 views of the film. I don’t think any of us expected the response to be this great, especially as there was nothing that we could find on the internet about disability bullying.

You mentioned in the past that you wrote about your feelings. Was this helpful in dealing with the experience of bullying?

The poetry I write helps me deal with what happened to an extent. It was very useful when talking to the guy at school because I found it really hard to just talk about the bullying at first, so knowing he already knew took the pressure off me a bit.

Might other young people find this helpful, especially if they haven’t got someone they can easily confide in?

It can be really helpful to write about how you are feeling, but it will only get better if you tell someone, whether that’s a friend, a teacher or your parents.

What would you say to teachers about bullying?

If you are a teacher witnessing bullying don’t just stand there, actually do something to stop it, but in a way that is not going make it worse for the victim.

This is my story. I was bullied because I’m disabled.

Trendsetters is a project run by Scope for young disabled people.

Anti-Bullying Week 2013, 18-22 November, calls on children and young people to take the lead in creating a future without bullying – using new technology to promote positive communication rather than being held back by cyber bullying.

Bullying is something that many of Scope’s Trendsetters, a group of disabled young people, say they’ve experienced.

We ran a workshop with the group about bullying this summer.

Young disabled people at bullying workshop

Bullying causes bad feelings. We threw these into a bin.

Rubbish bin representing bad feelings

One Trendsetter wanted to use technology to share her experience of being bullied. She wanted to send out a positive message about stopping bullying by creating this short film on bullying.

Her message is: “If you are being bullied, or know someone who is, tell someone.”

Do you need someone to talk to?

ChildLine - 0800 11 11

ChildLine is a free, confidential support service. Their staff speak to thousands of young people every day – you are not alone. Phone 0800 11 11 or visit the ChildLine website.

BeatBullying online help

Get help and support from the BeatBullying online mentors and counsellors, whenever and wherever you need it. Visit the BeatBullying website.

Are you a parent, carer or teacher looking for advice?

Kidscape Anti-bullying helpline - 0845 205 204

Helpline for parents or carers. Advisers are available Monday to Thursday from 10am to 4pm. Call the helpline on 0845 205 204 or Visit the Kidscape website.

BullyingUK and Contact a Family

Get advice if your disabled child is bullied. Visit the BullyingUK website.

Anti-Bullying Alliance

Get Anti-Bullying week teaching materials from the Anti-Bullying Alliance and resources from BeatBullying.

Share your tips

Share your tips on how to beat bullying in the comments. Here are some positive thoughts from the Trendsetters to get you started:

“Be a strong person within yourself, believe in yourself and always [have] confidence in expressing your emotions.”

“Bullying can [happen] anywhere so don’t let anyone take advantage of you. You have the right to say no to anything, and you have the right to be yourself.”

“Don’t let people judge you just because you’re being you, and you shouldn’t stop being yourself just because someone doesn’t like you.”

Or use the hashtag #ABW2013 on Twitter.

Do you believe in ghosts?

Guest blog by Trendsetter Connor who is 16. Trendsetters is a project run by Scope for young disabled people. As it’s Halloween this week, he’s written a blog to tell us why he wants to be a ghost hunter.

Trendsetter Connor

I want to be a ghost hunter because I am interested in the paranormal. When I was three years old, I was walking into the bathroom and looked back and there was a figure stood in my bathroom. Then I looked back again and it was gone.

I definitely believe in ghosts because every house I’ve lived in, I’ve had strange experiences.

I’m really interested in the history of ghost hunting, scientists started trying to record ghosts as far back as 1933.

Halloween is on the 31 October and is the perfect time to do some ghost hunting.  You could use things like a torch or a camera to try and see a ghost.

This Halloween why don’t you try and get into the spirit of things?  How about these fun ways to get involved:

  • Get dressed up.  You could try a spooky costume or a costume you think is fun.
  • You and your friends could try telling each other some scary stories with a small prize for the scariest.
  • Ask an adult to help you make some super-scarey food.  Put some gummy worms in jelly for some ghostly ectoplasm (that’s the stuff ghosts leave behind).

Let me know what you are doing for Halloween in the comments box.

Harry’s cards

Anna, Harry’s mum, talks about how they came up with the idea for Harry’s cards, and the benefits he has found using them.

“After chatting with him about what to do, we came up with the idea of a set of small cards designed just for him, about him. Each card would have a question and a simple answer to that question. To make them personal we picked a photograph or picture that meant something to Harry.”

In Harry’s own words…

“I came up with the idea when people started asking me “why do you talk funny?” and “what is epilepsy?” so instead of trying to explain it I made these cards and gave them one. It has the question on the front and the answer on the back. They are my very own as they are about me and have a photograph of me on them as well. They help me.”

Anna continues, “We had them designed and sets printed. They are business-card size and a set of them can be kept in a little plastic box. Now when Harry is asked or even if he wants to volunteer the information, he can simply hand over a set and let people read. They also act as a good ice breaker and support in other discussions on cerebral palsy.

“He has presented them in his class and sets of them are available at his school, they are small enough to carry around in his bag or even his pocket. They can over time be added to and changed as Harry grows and develops.

“A simple idea but one which has proved to be very useful in removing the ‘elephant in the room’ (discussing his condition).”

Download our postcards which describe living with cerebral palsy.

Trendsetters help Dayo lead the life he wants to!

Trendsetters group

The Trendsetters group of young disabled people spent the day with a team from Advocreate sharing ideas using mime, sound, speeches, poems and even a bit of rapping! They were given the task of helping a wannabe actor ‘Dayo’ overcome different obstacles on his way to an audition.

  • He has no money to buy a costume
  • He has a problem with his dad
  • He doesn’t believe he’s good enough to audition
  • He’s nervous about joining a drama class in his community
  • He gets told the drama class is full because someone is worried he’ll be better than them
  • Someone at the drama class suggests he’s ‘different’

Scope has been working with Manchester Metropolitan University to think about the kinds of things, like people and experiences, that can help you lead the life you want to lead. It’s great to be assertive, but you don’t have to always rely on just yourself. Advocreate took some of these ideas and turned the workshop into a few hours of fun ‘creative advocacy’.

So much was talked about on the day, the Trendsetters thought we could share some of the discussion in a short guide on this website. We’ll use photos to explain some of the ideas about what can help someone lead the life they want to lead and you’ll find out whether Dayo made it to the audition…

If you would like to come to next year’s workshop, you need to be a Trendsetter .Find out how to join Trendsetters here.

My Moment to Shine by Jhon Bateman

Guest post from Jhon Bateman

Jhon, Olympic torch bearer

On Tuesday 3 July, in Loughborough, I carried the London 2012 Olympic Torch for 440 metres as part of its 70-day relay across Great Britain before arriving at the Olympic Stadium on  27 July. I was runner 34 of the day, which meant that I was quite early on in the day – I had to be at the Collection Point for 8:00 ready to carry the torch at 10:42! The experience was amazing but over so quickly – the road was packed with people watching me go past, cheering me on and taking lots of photos. I loved it – I felt like a celebrity! I saw people I haven’t seen in years who had turned out to see me and young schoolchildren from the surrounding area all out ready to cheer me on.

After my leg of the relay, I got on to shuttle bus 2 at the back of the second convoy with all of the torchbearers who had already carried the torch. We were all so excited! Our bus was full of torchbearers waiting their turn but I was only the third on the bus, so I had a long wait afterwards. After travelling through three more towns after finishing Loughborough, we headed back to Loughborough University where our torches were decommissioned (this is where the gas canister is taken out) and given back to us.

I was quite a lucky torchbearer, as I was selected through the Coca-Cola selection campaign called Future Flames. Coca-Cola is one of the 3 presenting partners of the London 2012 Olympic Torchbearers alongside Samsung and Lloyds TSB/RBS. Future Flames are “exceptional young people who have been nominated by their communities”. As a Coca-Cola Future Flame, the Olympic Torch was purchased for you, you were given 2 VIP tickets to one of the Coca-Cola Special City Celebration events and photos are purchased for you!

Overall, I have really enjoyed the whole experience of being a London 2012 Olympic Torchbearer and will remember my Moment to Shine forever.

 

Trendsetters Blog by Bradley Roper aged 12

Guest post from Bradley Roper, aged 12.

The day after Kayne and I appeared in the BBC1 programme, Racing with the Hamiltons, I was a bit late for school so my Nan said, “Let’s catch the bus.”

The first Bus Driver wouldn’t let us on and wagged his finger at us. We are used to this and I had discussed my experience of bus drivers’ attitudes with Nic Hamilton on the TV programme the night before.

My Nan stormed away with steam coming out of her ears. Then a bus hooted behind and pulled up beside us. The bus was ‘out of service’ and the Bus Driver called out to us: “Where are you going?”

I said, “To school.”

He said, “OK, I’ll drop you off – I am going to change your opinion of bus drivers.”

Although the bus stop is near the school, he drove right down to literally outside the school gates – he had obviously seen the programme!!

Nic Hamilton documentary

Nic Hamilton and Trendsetters

The Trendsetters team is really excited to report that the filming Bradley and Kayne took part in with Nic Hamilton made it onto the TV!

Last night’s BBC1 documentary, Racing with the Hamiltons: Nic in the driving seat showed Nic visiting Scope offices in London where he met Kayne and Bradley and was interviewed by them. The documentary is very interesting and well worth a viewing, so have a look at it – you can find it on BBC I-Player.

Well done Trendsetters, you made it!