Designing content that puts disabled people and their families first

Scope wants to be the go-to organisation for disability information and support. We’re aiming to reach two million people a year, supporting disabled people and their families on the issues that matter most to them.

We want to make sure that people can access the information and advice they need easily – whether they are a customer of our services, are calling our helpline, or are looking for support and advice on our website.

This has meant re-thinking how we design and deliver our support and advice content. Our new approach has four central principles.

Content design

We design content to help people solve problems. Disabled people and their families are at the heart of our work. We ask them about their information needs and write content to meet those needs. Then we test the content with disabled people and their families and make improvements in response to what we find out.

Joining things up

Our policy team helps us plan content that supports our social change goals. Once the content is written, policy advisers join critique sessions to check and improve content before it’s published. We’ve built a great relationship with the policy team by working like this. And it means that the information and advice we give our customers is consistent with our public influencing work.

Evolution not revolution

We evolved our content design process during a ‘proof of concept’ project with a team of three. We’ve used what we learned to scale up to a team of nine, delivering advice and support content on a much more ambitious scale than Scope has done before. We use Kanban, a workflow management tool, to optimise the flow of work through the process. The Kanban ethos encourages us to carry on evolving and improving the way we work.

Open and transparent

Our processes and policies are written down and open to all. We have a clear content strategy and style guide. We use a shared Trello board to map the progress of each piece of content, which means we can easily spot if something is getting blocked and do something about it. If we see ways to improve how we work, we say so and agree what changes to make.

This is a summary of how we’re evolving the practice of content design to achieve our strategy, Everyday Equality. We’ll share more about how we work and what we’ve learned as our journey continues. Watch out for more posts from our content designers, user researchers and the people we work with.

Visit our employment section to see the first results of Scope’s new way of producing content.

‘We all want to live the lives we choose’

Jameisha talks about the impact of a hidden impairment and how attitudes affect her daily life.

As a young person living with Lupus and a few other hidden impairments, I have had my fair share of challenges confronting attitudes surrounding my conditions. These experiences often come from well-meaning people, but they are a marker of how we need to change as a society to be more understanding and inclusive.

I have become very self-conscious about how people see me as a young person with an invisible impairment. So many thoughts go through my mind. What’s everyone thinking when I sit in the priority seating area? Are people judging me for getting the lift instead of the stairs? Are people staring at me for using the disabled parking space at the supermarket. It got to the point where I wouldn’t take help in fear that I would be judged. Ultimately, the consequences impacted my health.

These thoughts have come from real life experiences

I’ve had comments from people on more than one occasion telling me to get the stairs instead of the lift because I am “so young and healthy.” I once plucked up the courage to ask for a seat in the priority seating area on the train because I couldn’t stand any longer on my bad hip. My request was met with blank stares and lowered heads. It still feels humiliating thinking about that as I write this.

To the left Jameisha's is looking direct at the camera. Half of her face is shown. She is wearing glasses, a headscarf and headphones. To the right, there is half a tube window with the big round sticker on the window which says Priority seating, please consider passengers when using this seat #travelkind

There are also many barriers when it comes to the workplace. Many employers out there do not understand hidden impairments. It’s so frustrating. Part of me trying to live the life I choose involves the ability to work, but I shouldn’t have to sacrifice my health in order to financially support myself. I’ve had numerous jobs where I’ve been transparent about my conditions, but employers still were not able to offer me the support I needed. In fact at one job, my contract was terminated due to a Lupus flare up.

No-one offers me help because they can’t see anything is wrong

I try not to think that people are inherently bad. I think having a visual aid plays a role in that. When dealing with Lupus on a day to day basis, no one offers me any help because they can’t see that anything is wrong. After my hip surgery when I was on crutches, random strangers were bending over backwards to help me. It was a very interesting experience to say the least. At the same time I should add that even with a visual aid like a walking stick, wheelchair or crutches, I have spoken to many people who still face obstacles when it comes to societal attitudes. We still have work to do.

Jameisha's hand outspread and face up, with the Please offer me a seat badge and card. The text on the card says Please offer me a seat, Remember not all disabilities and conditions are visible.

One thing I had to do, to live the life I choose is to change my own attitude

I decided to put my health first. If I need to get the lift, I have to overcome those thoughts that stop me from doing so. I continue to be transparent when applying for jobs and focus my attention one roles that will not cause further harm to my body. I still have trouble asking for a seat on the train, but I’m working on that. The Please Offer Me A Seat badges and signs I have seen on public transport have shown me that there are steps being made to change attitudes in how we treat people with hidden impairments.

We all want to live the lives we choose

That goes for non-disabled and disabled people. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to, and societal attitudes play a part in that. For me, as someone with an invisible impairment, something that will help is shifting the way we think. I definitely feel we are making positive changes, but I think we need to change faster. I hope that with more disabled people speaking out and being visible (whether their conditions are visible or not) we can get to a place where everyone lives the life they choose.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“I can’t live the life I choose without PIP.”

Josie, from Bristol, was a nurse until 2008 where she developed a number of impairments which affect her health and mobility. She has most recently been diagnosed with Mast Cell Activation, a condition which affects immunity and increases the chances of anaphylaxis attacks.

Following Scope Chair, Andrew McDonald’s comments on how the benefits process is a ‘hostile environment’, Josie describes her experiences of the PIP process.

I cannot live the life I choose without Personal Independence Payments (PIP).

I need a carer to go out anywhere and, beyond local, basic shops (many of which I can’t access), I need a wheelchair accessible taxi. This carries an extra surcharge of £10 to £20 per trip in most areas.

I pay towards my care and need to provide all materials. Without PIP, I would not be able to even meet my basic bills. This is before you consider anything fun. My bills are so much higher than an average household my size.

Josie, a disabled woman, smiles at the camera
Josie has had a negative experience of the PIP process

You feel on edge all of the time

The whole PIP process is very disjointed. Many would think the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) and PIP were the same department. No. If you communicate with PIP or the assessors, they don’t share any systems so two calls are needed. When you’re already poorly, the energy to make several calls is a lot. Most days you just have to pick between the most important calls.

You feel on edge all of the time. When I was in hospital, they sent an assessor. Thankfully, he rang the day before so it didn’t count as me not meeting the appointment. Had I missed that call, it would have and I would have been sanctioned.

When I was discharged, I rang them to get a new date. I took a cancellation which meant I didn’t have to wait many stressful weeks. I had one home assessment, but then they lost my file. They rang me and told me that I had to repeat the whole home visit again. This was really stressful.

The assessments are stressful

I’ve had so many assessors tell me that “they understand”. They don’t. They can’t. Their ability to keep a roof over their heads is not dependant on this assessment. Not to mention the reality of living day to day with an illness and disability.

The assessors were scripted. Professional but formal. I found it hugely stressful and can’t imagine how anyone with mental health issues, developmental delay or dementia would cope. I was scared anything I said would be written down differently to what I meant. I was petrified I would have to appeal and a tribunal would happen.

Josie, a disabled woman, wears a face mask to protect against allergens
Josie, who is severely allergic to a long list of different things, wearing her face mask

I’m housebound and allergic to the world. Stress alone could land me in A and E with a life-threatening reaction. This was completely unknown to the assessor when they arrived. It upset me for four months after my discharge. I cried with relief when I got the award letter because the practicalities of me attending a tribunal seemed impossible.

I did not trust the PIP process at all. Despite having Disability Living Allowance (DLA) for eight years, the whole assessment started from scratch. Mother’s maiden name, date of birth, everything. It’s almost like you have never claimed at all.

I felt like I was once again having to prove my illness and disability.

What are your experiences of the PIP process? Share your experiences on our Facebook page or by emailing us at stories@scope.org.uk.

“Education is said to be a ‘stepping stone’, but for disabled people it’s a slippery one”

Kasia talks about how the quality of access support varies greatly from university to university, and the impact this has on being able to live the life you choose. 

Education is said to be “a stepping stone” towards one’s career.  Unfortunately, to a disabled person, it often becomes more of a slippery stone.  There are a few university rankings that are widely available, with those from the Guardian and the Times being the most often quoted.  Sadly, there is no ranking system available that would rate quality of support available to student with access needs.  Far too often disabled students choose a university where it is guaranteed they will receive appropriate support rather than a university with better teaching that can also offer better chances of employment.  The quality of access support varies greatly from university to university.

I myself experienced different levels of support.  They varied from very poor to excellent.

The quality of support I received was very poor

A few years ago, I started a Postgraduate course at one of London’s universities.  I was still sighted at that time.  I then returned a year later as a student with a visual impairment having been diagnosed with a brain tumour too late to prevent my sight loss.

I had to cope with sight impairment while learning access technology and new ways of studying.  I used to rely heavily on my visual memory.  The quality of support I received was very poor.  It was limited to assigning me support workers.  I kept getting the same people despite expressing my dissatisfaction.  I was told by a Disability Support Officer (DSO) on one occasion that a support worker is my eyes and I should know how to use a search engine.  Later on, I was told that the DSO was making faces and rolled her eyes whilst talking to me.

In order to complete my studies, I had to submit a final dissertation.  My supervisor contacted the Disability Department and asked for someone to transcribe audio recordings.  I was assigned one person but when I asked for an additional transcriber, I was told that a meeting was required to establish my support needs, as unfortunately, they were not aware.  That was despite them being told directly by my supervisor what I required.

I ended up making a formal complaint against the DSO.  This improved the quality of her work slightly but unfortunately not for long.  The whole experience was very difficult and challenging.

I consider graduating from that university with a good grade to be the greatest achievement of my life.

More recently I tried to do a Human Resources course at a local college of further education.  The course has a CIPD (Charted Institute of Personnel and Development) accreditation.  The whole course consists of three levels with the most advanced being at a postgraduate level.  I did all that was required of me to be assigned to the right group.  I submitted a case study and filled in all the necessary forms.  It all took time and effort.  I was initially told by their DSO that I will be given access to electronic copies of books that I would require.  However, later on I was told something completely different.  On the top of that, the course leader informed me that she had never had a student that required learning materials electronically.  She had students with sight impairment who were able to access large print.  I certainly wasn’t made feel welcome.  Instead I felt discouraged and disheartened by the whole process and the attitude of the staff in the college.  Suffice to say, I decided not to go ahead with the course.

I will never willingly put myself in this situation again

A few years later I did another course at a different university.  It was a private university.  The experience couldn’t have been more different.  They were fantastic.  They just couldn’t do enough.  All that despite the fact that I wasn’t entitled to Disabled Students Allowance (DSA) funding.  They had a designated librarian who I could contact for any book I required.  She would then write to a respective publisher in order to obtain electronic copies of books.  They organised orientation walks for me in the campus.  They were always there for me whenever I required any support.  They were absolutely brilliant!

At the end of September this year I’m starting a PG Diploma in Media, Campaigning and Social Change at the University of Westminster.  I attended an open day this Summer.  Everything has been made as accessible to me as possible.  This includes the application process.  The course leader put me in touch with a current student who also has a sight impairment.  The student couldn’t be happier with the level of support he received.

It is important to know what to expect.  During my first course after my eye sight had deteriorated, I didn’t know what support I was entitled to.  I didn’t know what to expect.  I didn’t know what to ask for.  It certainly helps to know what access technology is available out there.  You then know what to ask for. Events such as Sight Village  that are organised in a few major cities in the UK are worth visiting.  Attending various events is always beneficial if not to find out about access technology, then to learn about everything else.  You just never know.

Kasia looking at the camera, smiling, wearing access technology glasses

There is no doubt that there should be equal access to education for everyone.  Society can lose out on a lot of talent.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this.  We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“my impairment left me feeling like I was on a deserted island but technology helped me feel at home”

Ajay, Service Desk Team Lead Analyst at Scope talks about his journey from the age of 16 to a working adult, showing how technology has helped him live the life he chooses.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at computer screens at work

For me living with an impairment is a bit like being in a relationship, you and your impairment know each other very intimately, you share every moment together, you sleep together, eat together and spend a lot of time getting to know each other very well. Like most relationships you also have conflicts, and both sometimes desire different things. This certainly was the case with my impairment and me.

As I got older my disability became worse and by the time I turned 16 years old I had lost all movement in my hands. From being able to write, play musical instruments or even feed myself, I was left with no movement at all. It was as if my impairment had left me on a deserted island with no hope of getting back home.

Technology changed my life for the better

This is where technology came into effect and really changed my life for the better bringing more control and freedom to it. I remember a time when I was watching TV at home and CNN showed an advert for a new piece of technology that had come out in the US called the Smartnav.

It was a device that would let you control the mouse using your head. It works by sending a signal to a piece of reflective material which you can attach anywhere and when you move that, it would control the mouse. You can click using additional switches or keys on the keyboard. When I learnt about this I immediately contacted the suppliers and purchased it from the US. At the time I could not operate the computer without assistance and if this worked I would feel not completely disabled again.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at his work screen on his chair and talking into his microphone

I remember when the first one arrived it was faulty, and I was extremely disappointed. It meant that I had to return it and wait for the next one to arrive which came in a couple of weeks. As soon as I plugged it in and configured it, I was hoping that this would change my life and let me use a computer again. When I started using it, it was amazing! I was able to control the mouse with precision and complete control. It had opened up a new world to me as I was able to use the computer again, and hope of getting off that deserted island had become a possibility again.

The internet was a complete life changer

As I got older, the Internet started taking over people’s lives and more and more Internet Service Providers were providing Internet connectivity to people’s homes. Being able to use the internet was a complete life changer for me also because it meant I could communicate with anyone around the world and I could research and look at whatever I wanted.

The next piece of technology, which completely transformed my life again was a device called the Housemate which I have been using since February this year.

This device with an app installed on your mobile, lets you control devices around your home. Being able to control the TV again was fantastic and I didn’t need to rely on having to ask someone to change channels or access recordings and so on. With this device I can control the TV completely, being able to record, playback recordings, change channels and fully operate my Sky box. Feeling bored was now not an option.

Technology gives me the independence to be part of society

Without technology I don’t think I could really survive in this world, being imprisoned in a body which cannot move can be very depressing at times and it’s something I would not wish anyone to go through. Finding different ways to keep your hopes up and trying to perceive things positively can sometimes be a job in itself and extremely tiring. Technology brings a breath of fresh air to my life, being able to live it the way I want, giving me the independence to be part of society, be employed and share experiences with friends and family.

There is no limit to what technology could bring to disabled people’s lives

What I would really like to see is developers and manufacturers to develop more technology and software to bring more freedom and independence to lives of many disabled people out there, who rely on technology not as a luxury, but as a means to get through life on a daily basis. I think if there was more awareness raised in Information Technology about the needs of disabled people, then there is no limit to what technology could bring to people’s lives and perhaps maybe someday it could even get me off this deserted island that my impairment left me on many years ago.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger, so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“This is why I fight to overcome barriers to employment for disabled people.”

Max, a writer and Disability Gamechanger, writes about the challenges he faces finding employment as a person with autism.

I choose to fight for the voices of others on the autistic spectrum. Through my own efforts to find work and my writing, I aim to show that those on the autistic spectrum can play an important role in the workplace and indeed, society.

As someone who has a deep passion for social issues and strongly believes in the concept of society, I want to contribute to society through employment. And yes, I do realise that means paying taxes!

All I need is a bit of patience

Along my personal journey, there have been many positive experiences as well as challenges and people who have believed in me. I recently undertook a placement at a very inclusive and welcoming PR marketing agency in Barry, Wales. Here I was given the patience and understanding to build my confidence and work at my own speed. I am also working part-time with an education technology start-up to help develop kids and adults digital skills.

The main barrier for me in the past, and one which I still sometime face has been interviews. I often struggle to express all my strengths in the pressurised situation that is a job interview, and as a result I feel that employers only see my anxiety.

Though I recognise that verbal communications skills are important in marketing and any other employment sector, I know that once I settle into an environment I can achieve anything I set my mind to! All I need is a bit of patience.

One of the biggest impacts that such barriers have had on me are feelings of isolation and loneliness. I am sure these are feelings which are shared by many others in the disabled community.

A young man smiles with his dog
Max at home with his dog

Everybody has value to add

To achieve progress, I believe there should be a greater focus from employers on what  disabled people can do, not what they may find difficult at first. Just as everyone has their own weaknesses, everybody has value they can add to a team.

Creating an environment where all abilities thrive, enabling a wide range of talent, is key. Similarly, creating interview processes which are flexible and allow this talent to shine, I believe can be a positive step forward.

Take those with autism, for example. We are creative, focused and have attention to detail. These are all positive traits which can be valuable within a team.

By creating more diverse teams, this means that more organisations will have the ability to represent their customers and society. Surely, this is something we can all agree is a good thing.

It is time that we focus on ability, not disability.

Half of disabled people feel excluded from society and many say prejudicial attitudes haven’t improved in decades.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, so we all need to work together to change society for the better. 

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved with the campaign today to end this inequality.

“This is how assistive technology is helping me live the life I choose”

A keen campaigner and writer, Raisa uses lots of different assistive technology to help her do day to day tasks. Here, she writes about some of these pieces of technology and how they help her live the life she chooses.

I’m very selective when choosing assistive technology. Of course, everything has its purpose, but if it is no use to me, there’s no point in using it.

For me, because I have the option, I don’t use assistive technology for absolutely everything. I’ve only considered using assistive technology seriously when I started university in 2013.

Because I was doing a Creative and Professional Writing degree, it was clear that there was going to be a lot of writing involved. There was no guarantee that I would be able to type everything up in time, by only using two fingers on the keyboard without a fast typist beside me. I was lucky in the sense that I got quite a lot of help through Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) at uni.

I’ve always had the habit of writing nearly everything by hand so I can literally see what I am typing, rather than transferring my thoughts straight onto a computer. I have never been able to do it. The only exception is when I compose emails. But even then, if my email is really long and I’m really exhausted, I would probably end up using some sort of assistive technology.

A woman laughs whilst talking in a group at the Scope for Change residential
Raisa talking to fellow campaigners

Technology has so many uses

I am (literally) using Dragon Naturally Speaking 13 to dictate this post in my bedroom. This version is pretty good. I was first introduced to this software in 2009, when version 9 came out. It was horrendous. No matter how much I tried to train the software to my voice there were too many typos per page. I literally wanted to rip my hair out.

I got Dragon 12 at the beginning of my university course in 2013. Thank God I did. There was just too much to do in so little time! Don’t get me wrong, it still makes mistakes, but they’re so rare that I can live with it now.

Something else I use quite regularly was my Olympus Sonority voice recorder. I used this device to record every single one of my lectures or big public events over the last five years. It’s great that they automatically convert into audio files that work on pretty much any device – so I could listen to them anywhere if I wanted to, either on my phone or laptop. It saves as a compatible file for your memory stick also – bonus!

Assistive technology can help you live the life you choose

A family friend showed me Apple’s voice recognition software and how it worked before I got my first iPhone. I got really excited by this. I wouldn’t use Siri in public, but voice recognition software on my phone has helped me do my most important job these days – dictating and replying to emails! I have a habit of sending really long emails! I don’t have to use my laptop, I just have to hold my phone in my hand and speak.

A woman laughs with another campaigner at Scope for Change
Raisa laughing with another campaigner

One of my really long emails to date, which I wrote by only my right thumb and predicted text (without using voice recognition at all), took me two hours to type. However, if I wrote that same email again using voice recognition software on my phone, it would have only taken me about half an hour. It is also a quick way to make notes in your notes section for reminders.

I personally wouldn’t go as far as using assistive technology to help me with absolutely everything. I don’t want technology to directly take over my life. However, I hope that this post has been helpful in showing how assistive technology can help you to live the life you choose.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better. 

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“Disability is full of compromises and workarounds”

Edith was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis when she was 16. As her condition started worsening, it was essential that she found a social care package that met her needs.

In this blog, Edith writes about how finding the right social care package has enabled her to focus on the other important things in life.

Writing about my twice daily care visits feels like trying to describe brushing my teeth, or cutting my nails. It’s boring and I aim not to focus any great deal of time on it, it’s just an essential part of daily life.

A young woman smiles whilst sitting on a sofa, typing on a laptop
Edith sitting on a sofa with her laptop

I use a wheelchair full time, but the ‘book ends’ of my day are especially hard. Lying in bed overnight, my whole body stiffens up and takes a while to stretch out and co-operate. Come evening, fatigue has turned me to jelly.

Add in flare ups, temperature variations and colds or viruses. Each day is a surprise. My carer starts by stretching my legs in bed and helping me to a sitting position. Using a standing frame I transfer to my wheelchair, and in a subsequent set of routines I get dressed and ready for my day. The process is fairly cumbersome and long winded, but we go the fastest we can, totalling around an hour.

Night calls follow a similar set of processes, all made quicker and easier if I’m having a ‘good day’, but following a routine which we know well enough to follow without fuss.

It means I can focus on the rest of my life

My social care calls are crucial. Do I want to have company first thing in the morning? Would I love to get up and make a cup of tea then go back to bed for a few hours? What about those unexpected evenings out where one drink turns into many and you just re-adjust your 12 hour plan accordingly.

The alternative is being bed bound, in some residential home, or relying on my parents (while I can, then what?). So when it works, my social care support enables everything else.

With the essentials of personal care covered, I can focus on the rest of my life, the nights out, holidays, work, credit card bills… just life. To me social care is as necessary a part of my functioning as any of my healthcare, if not more so.

I’m frustrated by the wires I’ve had to untangle to get social care in place, the lack of transparency in funding and set up. It feels more vulnerable than the NHS and prescription meds, yet to me should be treated in the same way.

It’s all a part of my life I’d rather not have to incorporate, but fundamental for me to achieve, do, live or anything else.

Read more from Edith on her blog.

Half of disabled people feel excluded from society and many say prejudicial attitudes haven’t improved in decades.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, so we all need to work together to change society for the better. 

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so join the campaign today to end this inequality.

Will you be a Disability Gamechanger?

Today, Scope launches a new campaign to tackle disability inequality head on. Head of Policy, Campaigns and Public Affairs, James Taylor, tells us why it’s an issue we all need to get behind.

“Negative attitudes, poor access to support or transport, limited opportunities for work.

Disabled people tell us that these things matter. They lead to discrimination, to prejudice and to being seen as an afterthought.”

“The things that people say to you never go away. There have been times where bad attitudes have made me ask, what’s the point?” – Marie

“People with invisible impairments still struggle for people to ‘believe’ their condition is real.

On buses, trains and planes we’re often denied equal service and equal treatment.

When we want to go on a night out, the disabled toilet is often an extra storage cupboard, because we’re not thought of as customers.

Hear from some of the storytellers in this film, highlighting the barriers disabled people face in their day-to-day lives.”

The scale of the issue

“Our latest research shows how many disabled people feel and experience this.

We spoke to disabled people right across Britain to find out about their day-to-day lives – what makes them happy, what angers or frustrates them and what they want to get out of life.

We wanted to understand what equality means to disabled people today, and we wanted to start from what disabled people think and feel, and how important independence is to them.

Overwhelmingly disabled people told us they want to be independent, to have confidence and to be connected through friends, family, colleagues and communities.

Yet for too many disabled people this isn’t the case.”

“I’ve been excluded from social situations or activities due to my condition. People make assumptions about what I am able to do. It’s really frustrating.” – Shani

“Earlier this year, Opinium polled 2,000 disabled adults for Scope and found:

  • 49 per cent of disabled people said they feel excluded by society
  • Just 23 per cent said they felt valued by society
  • On top of this, only 42 per cent of disabled people believe the   UK is a good place for disabled people

These statistics make it obvious that the fight for disability equality is far from over.

Throughout the last century we’ve seen action that has led to dramatic changes in our society, but our research demonstrates that there is still a way to go until all disabled people are able to live the lives they choose free from discrimination and low expectations.

At Scope we want to change this.

Whilst we might have protection in law, at Scope we know there is still a way to go until until all disabled people can enjoy equality.”

You can read more about the research in our report, ‘Independent, Confident, Connected’.

Be a Disability Gamechanger

“We have launched our new campaign calling on all those who want to work with us to show their support for disability equality. It doesn’t matter if you’re a bus driver, a politician, a teacher or an employer. You can all make a difference.”

We can’t do it alone. We know that we are stronger as a movement, as a community and as a force for change, when we work together.

If you, like us, want to end this inequality, join our campaign today.

Government outlines plans to make public transport more inclusive

Today the Government has published its new Inclusive Transport Strategy, outlining how they intend to make the transport network more accessible for disabled people. This includes over £300 million of funding to deliver the projects they’ve announced.

A positive commitment

The current transport system is set up in a way which deters – or even prevents – many disabled people from using it. The Inclusive Transport Strategy is a strong step in the right direction, dismantling some of the barriers disabled people face. This is not just about adjusting existing infrastructure to make it physically accessible, but tries to put the needs of all disabled passengers at the heart of designing our transport system.

Access for All

Our recent research found 40 per cent of disabled people have difficulty accessing train stations. The biggest announcement in the Strategy is that the Government is reviving the Access for All program, to provide funds to make railway stations more accessible. The £300 million which has been announced for the fund will go towards installing everything from lifts to tactile paving and automatic doors at more stations.

“I’ve lost out on great job opportunities because I arrived so late. There are no step-free stations near me so I have to drive everywhere, which takes so much longer” – Conrad

And this is on top of existing requirements for station operators to improve accessibility when they renovate their stations.

It’s not just railways that are getting an upgrade. The Strategy also announced that £2 million will be spent installing Changing Places facilities in motorway service stations, allowing more disabled people travelling by car to access a suitable toilet.

Attitudes

Disabled people frequently say that one of the biggest barriers to using public transport can be the attitudes of others. Whether it’s a non-disabled person refusing to offer a priority seat to someone who needs it, or a bus driver ignoring a wheelchair user at a bus stop, the attitudes of passengers and staff can make or break disabled people’s experiences of public transport.

“As I am young and have an invisible disability, I am often accused of not needing the accessible seats at the front of buses and…people rarely give up their seat to me when I ask” – Anonymous

The Inclusive Transport Strategy has recognised this, with a focus on both staff training and changing behaviours of non-disabled passengers. This will require bus and rail operators to provide disability awareness training to their staff, and the Government will spearhead a campaign to improve awareness of disability among all passengers.

The Rail Ombudsman

Even after the changes announced, things will still go wrong from time to time. While we want the Government and transport providers to work to eliminate these errors in the first place, it’s important that disabled people are able to complain and have action taken if things don’t go to plan with a journey.

The Strategy has announced a new Rail Ombudsman to help disabled people seek recourse. This body will have the power to rule on complaints relating to accessibility, and deliver binding judgements – meaning it can force train companies to act.

This will be accompanied by a new system for registering complaints about bus services, which will go to the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency who can take action against bus companies that don’t meet their obligations.

What’s next?

It’s worth noting that the Inclusive Transport Strategy contains many more proposed changes beyond the ones we’ve discussed in this blog.

While we have welcomed the Strategy, there is still much more to be done to ensure all disabled people are able to access and use transport as they wish.

As well as making sure the proposals from today are implemented in full, we’ll keep pushing the Government to make sure the transport system really is one that is fully inclusive and accessible to all disabled people.

Scope exists to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. Until then, we'll be here.

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