Bromley Council refuses to reverse textile bank decision

As a campaigner, I am often left with a mixed feeling of pride and disappointment. Leaving the Civic Centre in Bromley, after the Council meeting, was no exception. I felt extremely proud of the Scope charity shops staff and volunteers who led a local campaign to a meaningful conclusion, ensuring the significance of the issue came across, both in Bromley and more widely. But I found it difficult to shake off the feeling of disappointment that despite our efforts, Bromley council is maintaining a decision that could cost Scope £360,000 a year.

Since March, I have had the privilege of supporting the staff and volunteers from Scope charity shops in the Bromley borough. They have been encouraging their customers to sign a petition calling on Bromley Council to reverse their decision to evict Scope textile banks from council land, and to show other councils considering the move how unwelcome it is.

Campaign to save textile banks

The communities affected by this decision have launched an impressive and passionate campaign to save textile banks that act as a vital lifeline for their Scope shops. In only three weeks, the Bromley borough stores collected over 1,400 signatures from angry residents, opposed to the decision, and already we have heard that other councils are now wary of such a move.

The campaign came to an exciting close on 25 June, as we went along to  the Bromley Council meeting, to witness key councillors attempt to justify their decision, in front of the full council and residents.

The council chamber was full of spectators, and as Alex, Scope’s area manager, and Julie, the manager of the Petts Wood store spoke, the atmosphere in the room was tense. The overwhelming support we have received for this campaign was echoed by the loud applause Julie received as she finished her speech.

How loss of donations will affect disabled people

Despite this support, and the questions raised by opposing councillors in the debate, Councillor Smith, who is responsible for the decision, stood his ground. The removal of the banks in Bromley would dramatically affect our donation levels, and consequently impact on our work with disabled people and their families. This was clearly in the minds of all spectators as the councillor continued to explain why he felt Scope’s ‘privilege’ had now ended.

The support from the Labour and Liberal Democrat councillors, who requested the decision be referred back to the original steering group, was very welcome. There were questions raised on the transparency of the decisions made, and the true benefit to the community and other charities under the new plans. It was positive to hear our points be raised in the debate, and go a small way to reflect the outrage felt by Scope customers.

Despite this, the council voted to reject Scope’s petition.

Scope charity shops reaction to Bromley’s decision

Wendy Howden, manager of the Bromley Scope store attended the meeting, along with Julie.

I share Wendy and Julie’s disappointment at the decision. However, I remain positive that the support shown for this campaign is something we should be proud of. Bromley council were mistaken if they thought this change would happen without a response from Scope or the Bromley community. If we can join together to create such a brilliant, personal campaign in such a short amount of time, I have no doubt we can support the Bromley shops to be as successful as ever, and ensure this council decision does not impact on Scope’s essential work. We already know that other councils considering this type of contract have changed their minds, which is a fantastic achievement for the campaign and the future of Scope’s shops.

If you would like to support the shops affected in any way, please contact them directly: BromleyPetts WoodOrpington and Beckenham. I’m sure they would be grateful for your continued support.

We would like to thank everyone who signed the petition, and demonstrated an enthusiastic interest in this campaign. Your valuable support has sent a strong message to other London councils, who may be considering a similar move, of the strength of community support on this issue and the value of donations to charity shops.

We are always looking for enthusiastic campaigners to join us as we campaign on important issues such as this. Please join our campaign network here.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Olympic torch stars from Beaumont College

Jessica smiles broadly as her Olympic torch is lit, the flame bright against the grey sky. Despite heavy rain and flood warnings, thousands have lined the seafront in Morecambe to support Jess and her fellow torch bearers.

“It’s a moment she will remember forever,” says Jess’s mum, Louise. “I couldn’t be prouder,” she wipes away a tear and gives her 19-year-old daughter the thumbs up sign. Jess throws her head back and laughs – too excited to care about the rain which falls relentlessly, soaking everyone.

Jess is one of five disabled students from Scope’s Beaumont College – an educational service rated outstanding by Ofsted – who took part in the Olympic torch relay across Lancashire on 22 and 23 June. All were nominated for their commitment to giving disabled people a voice, their work spans everyday matters like more choice in the college restaurant to campaigning on national issues including cuts to legal aid.

“Since I’ve been at Beaumont, I’ve learned to be independent,” says student Tom Green, 21. “I like helping people get involved. I give talks in schools about being disabled and I do a lot of fundraising. When I was told I was a torch bearer, I just thought ‘wow!'”

Taking the torch from Morecambe to Preston

Tom is taking part in the relay in Preston. As he waits to take the torch from his friend and fellow student, Dan Crowe, 20, both families look on nervously. “This is such an exciting event,” says Tom’s dad, Peter. “We are exceptionally proud.” Moments later, Tom’s torch is lit and fitted to his wheelchair to loud cheers. “How are you feeling?” shouts a voice from the crowd. “Happy days!” responds Tom.

Vicki with a statue of Eric Morecambe.It wasn’t just Beaumont College students who took part in the Olympic relay. Vikki Brier, 53, a learning support worker at the college, was also a torch bearer. “It’s such a buzz that we’ve all been chosen,” says Vikki who is a tireless fundraiser for Scope and local charities. “To me, Beaumont College is all about creating opportunities. Taking part in the Olympic relay is, quite literally, an opportunity of a lifetime. We are making history!”

Vikki’s torch relay included a pit stop at the statue of Eric Morecambe, the comedian who changed his last name as a mark of respect to his home town. As she balances on the top of the memorial Vikki holds the flame aloft, so it appears Eric is holding the torch. “I think it’s going to be a couple of weeks before I come down from my cloud,” she jokes.

Unlike most torch bearers, who have a well-earned rest after their moment in the spotlight, Vikki, and Tom are now touring local mainstream schools with their torches (which cost £215 to buy!) to talk about the relay. “It’s also a great confidence boost for the young people. They were chosen as torch bearers for their achievements, not because of their disabilities. We are so proud of each other.”

Find out more about Beaumont College.