Steph Cutler hands out her own Paralympic medals

Guest post from Steph Cutler www.making-lemonade.co.uk

Even though the Paralympics has yet to finish, I think London already takes gold.

The London 2012 Paralympic Games are being shown in more countries than any previous Paralympic Games. Organisers have agreed a series of TV deals which mean over 100 countries are screening the games.

While we have a long way to go in the UK before disabled people enjoy equality, it is worth remembering that we are streets ahead of many other countries. It is simply amazing that more countries than ever are showing the 2012 Paralympics. Raising awareness often leads to change and what could be better than the most global platform to date to do this? This alone scores my first gold medal.

Not only is it being shown in countries who have previously taken little or no interest, but big players in sporting nations have committed to hours of airtime. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation is showing 100 hours, and Channel 4 is broadcasting 150 hours of live coverage with BBC 5 Live covering the radio waves.

Paralympic power!

What I love more than this, is that the new profile of the Paralympics has the power to shame! Broadcasters in the United States have been accused over many years of ignoring the Paralympics, but this year they have been forced to rethink their scheduling.

NBC was planning just four 60-minute highlight programmes followed by one 90-minute round-up after the Games were over. NBC is now running a daily highlights package via the US Paralympics YouTube channel following public pressure. Some way to go before America get it, but 2012 is the year they can learn from a small island!

Of course people power is compelling, but let’s not get too wrapped up in the bubble of Paralympic fever. Let’s keep our feet, or blades, or whatever alternatives to feet we have (suddenly anything goes and I love it!) on the ground.

My next gold comes in the commercial backing that the Paralympics is experiencing. Companies in the US are running slick TV commercials featuring disabled athletes endorsing a range of products. Sponsoring the Games is one thing but for companies to use disabled people to endorse a product takes this a step, no actually a leap, further.

Disabled people mean business!

While disability is riding the crest of a huge public profile coupled with an increasingly enthusiastic audience we cannot be ignored. Right now it is not about it being a nice thing to do. We can’t be ignored because we mean business, and better still, that business knows it!

Sainsbury’s is the first, and indeed only, Paralympic exclusive sponsor the Games has ever seen. Evidently, the retailer believes the Paralympics are not secondary to the main event and so there is a commercial benefit by association. This gets my third gold medal.

My next gold medal is given on the basis of legacy. Heathrow Airport has had the challenge of welcoming thousands of Paralympic athletes through the airport. Heathrow has invested in a package of permanent accessibility improvements which include staff training and specialist lifts and facilities. These changes will continue to benefit all passengers with reduced mobility long after the last medal has been awarded.

My final gold is driven by public demand. The Royal Mail has said it will now issue the individual stamps of our Paralympic gold medallists and get the gold paint out again to paint the local post boxes of winners.

Ironically, the reason behind the initial decision not to offer the same congratulatory gesture to Paralympic gold medallists as was offered to their Olympic counterparts, was that there are too many gold Paralympians! Basically, disabled people are too successful! Now isn’t that a nice change?