Disability and comedy

Young comedian Jack Carroll has made it through to the final of Britain’s Got Talent 2013. First and foremost Jack had the audience in stitches. Judge David Walliams called him “the new Peter Kay”.

But Jack also happens to have Cerebral Palsy, and it’s a good bet that his routine has helped a few people think differently about disability.

Jack joins a growing number of disabled comedians using humour to challenge attitudes to disability and make this a better place for disabled people…much in the way Britain’s Paralympians did with their amazing achievements last year.

So we thought we’d give you a taste of some of these great acts…

Francesca Martinez

“I think humour is a fundamental human right. It’s a big part of the way I handle my difference. If the audience feels sorry for me when I walk out on stage because I’m wobbly, I use humour to question why. By the time I walk off, I want them to see the person beyond the wobbles.”

http://www.scope.org.uk/news/disability-2012/stories/francesca-martinez

Adam Hill

“With comedy and disability people go, ‘Ooh, where’s the line?’ There is no line – if you’re celebrating, then you won’t say the wrong thing. As long as it comes from the place of going ‘This is great’. And it is, it’s an amazing sporting event. I think because everyone behind the show loves the Paralympics, we get it, we’ve seen a lot of Paralympic sports and we’ve all gone beyond that [he puts on an insipid voice], ‘Oh isn’t this inspiring’ and instead gone, ‘This guy’s awesome. It’s about the sport really.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2012/aug/24/adam-hills-comedian-disability-tv-paralympics#ixzz2UfoDwQDA

Laurence Clark

“I was sick and tired of going to comedy clubs and listening to comedians who used disabled people as the butt of their jokes, so I decided to redress the balance and have a go myself.”

http://www.insidecomedy.co.uk/default.php?action=article&controller=site&type=4&id=81

Lost Voice Guy

“I want to show that there’s a funny side to disability too and that people are allowed to have a sense of humour about it. I’d rather people talked about it than pretend it didn’t exist. It’s a big part of my routine but I wouldn’t want to focus on it forever, it’s just that I’ve got so many stories to tell about it.”

http://thedailychuckleonline.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/lost-voice-guy-man-who-spoke-to-us-all.html

Liz Carr

“I think disability is the last bastion of political correctness, and people need to see that disabled people are funny, you know, our lives are quite fascinating and there’s a lot that people can learn from that.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/society/2006/jun/21/disability.socialcare

Steve Day

“Once any initial reluctance on the part of the audience to laugh at disability is overcome, it provides, I think, an interesting perspective. There still is that resistance though, sometimes, every now and again an audience simply won’t have it. Two things have happened though, I’ve got funnier, and attitudes have changed, albeit slowly, since the early days. The Paralympics have also been a big help in making disability seem less scary and taboo, there is less reluctance to laugh.”

http://www.zug4you.ch/interview_with_steve_day___english_stand_up_comedian.html