What the Conservatives and Labour say about welfare reform and disability

Today the Work and Pensions Secretary Ian Duncan Smith gave a speech to mark the 10th anniversary of the formation of the Centre for Social Justice think-tank about welfare reform.

Here is what he had to say about disability:

“Of course in the most severe cases of sickness and disability, it is right that welfare should support individuals, but even then, it must be about more than sustainment alone. It should be about helping people to take greater control over their lives.

For all those who are able, work should be seen as the route to doing so – for work is about more than just money. It is about what shapes us, lifts our families, delivers security, and helps rebuild our communities. Work has to be at the heart of our welfare reform plan, or all we will do is increase dependency not lessen it.”

Read the speech in full on the Spectator website, or with other comments on the Guardian’s politics live blog.

On Tuesday Rachel Reeves, the shadow work and pensions secretary laid out her party’s stance on social security at the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) think-tank, and here is what she said about disability:

“Now it’s important to say at the outset that there will always be people who cannot do paid work, because of illness or disability.

“And it is part of our responsibility to them to make their rights a reality: rights to dignity and respect, to a decent standard of living, and to the resources and support that can empower them to contribute and participate equally and fully in society.”

Read the speech in full on the New Statesman website.