Priced out: what disabled people told us they pay more for

We launched a report today which shows that disabled people and their families pay more at every turn.

It isn’t only the extra costs of specialist equipment, or having to buy more of things, like heating or bedding. Disabled people are also being charged a premium for everyday items.

We have calculated that disabled people face a financial penalty of on average of £550 per month.

We asked you what you have to spend more on. Thanks for sharing your experiences on Facebook and Twitter – here’s what you told us.

Buying specialist products and adapted equipment 

Disabled people have to buy things that most families don’t have to budget for. You told us just how expensive specialist equipment and products can be.

“I am constantly amazed at the prices I have to pay for items and equipment. I am horrified by what some mobility equipment companies get away with charging.” – Sue

“My orthotic braces don’t fit in normal shoes and slippers so i have to buy them from specialist suppliers. These are MUCH more expensive than normal shoes.” – Fiona

“Why do wheelchair and equipment manufacturers all think that all wheelchair users are lottery winners?” – John

“The special aids are horrendously expensive.” – Jules

Things disabled people need to buy more of

Disabled people and their families often need to buy more of things. This could be a one-off expense, like buying a larger house to store medical equipment, or regular expenses, like taxis to work or higher energy use. Here’s what you buy more of.

“I fall a lot so I need to wash my clothes more often than non disabled people (on average), and my clothes get damaged quicker so need replacing more often. Due to my hyperhydrosis I go through more antiperspirants than ‘normal’ people and have to buy the more expensive super strength ones.” – Fiona

“I have dyspraxia and dyslexia. All my written work is done on my computer and printed out. So I buy more printer cartridges than others.” – Shirley Jones

“I’m physically disabled and have epilepsy so can’t drive – taxis soon mount up!” – Ruth

Paying more for everyday things

You also told us that you are often charged more for everyday things.

” I have to buy concert tickets over the phone instead if internet. Calls are charged at peak.” – Shani

“Companies read “disabled” or “special needs” but hear “keerching!!”. Scandal. Selling an I-Pad? Call it a “Communication Aid” and add a zero on to the end of the price.” – Wag

“Holiday insurance, could not go abroad last time we planned as no one would insure me and include medical problems.” – Helen

“Taxis drivers spend forever with clamps etc and are “legally allowed” to have the meter running either while putting you in or getting you out.” – Jenna

“It annoys me so much that you have to pay more for taxis as a disabled wheelchair user! Also it’s normally only the more expensive companies that have accessible vehicles!” – Adele

“Hospital parking costs a lot more as it takes me longer to get to the appointment and get out again, and I usually have to wait up to an hour for a disabled space at my local hospital. This all adds to the costs you have to pay.” – Fiona

What needs to happen

The extra costs that disabled people and their families face have a huge impact on living standards. Having less cash to spare makes it harder to afford the basics in life, avoid debt, and build up savings.

We think two things need to happen.

The Government needs to protect payments that help disabled people meet these extra costs.

We also need to find a way to bring down the premium that disabled people are paying for everything things.

We are calling for all Government departments to play a part in driving down disabled people’s extra costs. And Scope is launching a commission in the summer, to find ways to reduce the amount that disabled people pay in key areas, including housing, transport, equipment and technology.

Read the report and let us know on Facebook and Twitter what extra costs you face . Read the story on BBC News.

Priced out: ending the financial penalty of disability by 2020

Earlier this month Scope released the first in a series of reports that look in depth at the challenges within disabled people’s living standards.

When we talk about improving living standards in the UK, we often think of economic growth, prices and wages. But what is rarely recognised is a problem that affects disabled people’s living standards that pre-dates the recession – one owing to the additional costs of disability.

Today, we launch the second in our series of reports – Priced Out: ending the financial penalty of disability by 2020. The report brings together new research and analysis to investigate the extra costs disabled people face and how to tackle them.

Disabled people pay a financial penalty on life, which can be because of:

  • Having to buy more of everyday things (like heating, or taxis to work)
  • Paying for a specialist items (like a wheelchair or a hoist)
  • Paying more than non-disabled people for same products and services (like insurance)

On average disabled people spend £550 per month on disability related things.

Over 20 years ago – recognising this financial penalty- a Conservative government introduced Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to help cover the extra costs of disability.

Yet disabled people still feel their effects and:

Not only is financial instability bad for disabled people, but as people in the UK are living longer failing to address the problems posed by a growing, and significantly under-pensioned segment of the population, will have ramifications for the living standards of the UK as a whole. Tackling extra costs is therefore a policy imperative.

With a general election rapidly approaching, and with signs of economic growth in the UK beginning to show, there is an opportunity for political parties to set out what they will do to end this financial penalty by 2020, and make sure that disabled people are part of fair, inclusive growth.

Protecting crucial extra costs payments

DLA has been crucial for disabled people to lead independent lives, to take up opportunities, increase their own income and contribute to their communities.

But recent and planned welfare reform threatens these important payments.

DLA is being replaced by Personal Independence Payments (PIP). But PIP assessments do not ensure those who need support get it. 600, 000 disabled people are set lose DLA through its reform.

And in the Budget 2014, the Chancellor announced that starting in 2015-16 an overall limit of £119.5 billion will be placed on parts of social security spending.DLA and PIP are planned to be within the cap and are at risk of being cut because of it.

We recommend:

  • Last week an independent review of PIP assessments was announced. We call on the Government commit to replacing the current assessment of extra costs with a new one that more accurately identify disabled people’s extra costs.
  • The Government protect extra costs payments such as DLA and PIP by taking them out of the cap or ring-fencing them within it.

Making extra costs payments go further

 Extra costs payments do not go far enough. DLA and PIP do not cover all extra costs. Therefore disabled people are still more likely to be in debt and unable to build savings and contribute to pensions.

We recommend:

The Government make extra costs payments go further by committing to an extension of the ‘triple lock’ guarantee on pensions to extra costs payments in the next parliament – meaning they will rise by the highest of prices, earnings or 2.5% each year.

Driving down extra costs

Where extra costs can be driven down, they ought to be. Currently, only the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has responsibility for tackling the problem of extra costs. But in reality, all departments have a role to play. For example, research shows that inaccessible housing can dirve up contribute extra costs.

We recommend:

The Government and all political parties commit ensuring truly cross-departmental policy-making to identify and drive down the root causes of extra costs by placing the Office for Disability Issues (ODI) in the Cabinet Office.

Often things disabled people need to buy are very expensive – such as £3500 for a Lightwriter which turns text into speech. Affordable products to adapt mainstream tablets (which cost between £200 and £600) are not commonly available. And sometimes disabled people have to pay more for things just because they are disabled – for example facing large supplements for travel insurance based on their condition.

We recommend:

The Government, business and regulators re-balance markets so that they work better for disabled people. For example the Government should create a new funding stream as part of the Growth and Innovation Fund (GIF) from the Skills Funding Agency which invites employers in the relevant sectors to apply for investment in skills of their workforce, specifically to innovate for disabled people.

This approach will go some way in ending the financial penalty disabled people pay by 2020. This will raise disabled people’s living standards, and ensuring there is fair, inclusive growth which does not leave disabled people behind.

Later this month Scope will publish the third in this series. It will look at what the Government can do to create better job opportunities for disabled people.

In the Summer Scope will be launching a Commission on Extra Costs to investigate why there is a premium attached to the goods, services and infrastructure (housing and travel) disabled people use and what can be done to bring them down.