Marie holding her baby Mark

“It’s simple solutions that make all the difference”: Marie’s story

At three foot six and with brittle bone disease, Marie is constantly adapting to looking after her growing baby Mark. And Marie and her husband Dan are finding often it’s the simplest adaptations that make the biggest difference to family life.

Mark is nine months old now and we simply do not know where the time is going. Every day is magical and he brings us so much happiness. Mark has recently started feeding himself finger food and is really enjoying meal and snack times. He will walk over to me when he is in his walker to high five me, a new trick! It won’t be long before he is walking independently and we have already started moving things up, which is where the seat riser in my wheelchair comes in handy.

We recently had some building work done to improve our bungalow. When we bought our place four years ago we were refused any help with adaptations and alterations from the Disabled Facilities Grant.

Marie in a wheelchair, holding Mark, on their outside decking
Marie and Mark on their new outdoor decking

So we have had to save up for this work – and now the back end of our home is completely wheelchair friendly. I can now drive my chair out from our lounge straight onto the decking and then down into the garden, as we now have full level access. To keep costs down we used standard building materials, standard French windows and lots of inventiveness to make it all work. This now means Dan, Mark and I can make the most of the rest of the summer and start planning garden toys and sandpits and things for Mark next year as a toddler!

Also our local Remap charity (who are awesome) made me some ‘steps’ from plywood covered with soft foam and fabric, suitably sized to push up against our sofa. This very simple contraption now means I can climb from my wheelchair onto the sofa and then from the sofa independently get onto the floor to play with Mark. The ‘steps’ are then moved out of the way so Mark can’t climb up and down them, the cheeky little monkey that he is! Being able to get on and off the floor has been really good and Mark enjoys having mummy play on the floor too. Such a simple and elegant solution to one of life’s problems when you’re 3 foot 6 and can’t stand!

Marie sitting on a soft step next to a lounge
Marie on her new soft lounge steps

We’ve always found that it’s simple solutions like this that make all the difference. It just takes a bit of determination and lateral thinking and you can overcome most of life’s obstacles – that’s something having Mark is making me realise more and more.

Marie is blogging about being a disabled mum for Scope, and has been raising awareness by talking to Sunday People, That’s Life! magazine and Disability Horizons.

For simple tips on adapting your home, check out the new tips feature on our online community.

One thought on ““It’s simple solutions that make all the difference”: Marie’s story”

  1. This Is such a lovely story. I myself have quadriplegic cerebral palsy I am also a mother of 20 month old daughter. So I do understand it can become tricky. Like Marie I also am very grateful of the small adaptations. As a fulltime wheelchair user I am unable to operate my wheelchair whilst pushing my daughters pushchair. I heard that remap could help would solving such things. So I contacted remap and within a few days a volunteer engineer came up with a seat that would attached to the front of my chair. It was absolutely brilliant my daughter loved having rides with mummy and I could carry on with day to day tasks without struggling. It’s the small things that make all the difference

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