Green rolling countryside, with a stone house on the right hand side

Are you longing for an accessible summer?

We all know January can be a miserable time of year. So much so that Monday 19 January is supposed to be THE most depressing day of the year! It helps explain why a lot of people start booking their summer holidays around this time. Here we have a couple of brilliant home and away options for accessible holiday destinations, reviewed by disabled people…

Somewhere cheerful on my doorstep please

Perhaps The Beamsley Project in the Yorkshire Dales will be right up your alley!

Emily Yates is an accessibility consultant and accessible travel writer, who also has cerebral palsy and uses a wheelchair. She’s currently spending six months of her year in Rio de Janeiro, advising on transport accessibility for the upcoming 2016 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Emily spent her 21st birthday weekend at The Beamsley Project, and recently went back to properly assess all of the accessible features that it offers for disabled visitors.Large stone house in the countryside, with people sitting on a picnic table in front of it

Emily says, “in terms of accessibility, there are automatic external doors leading to a small lounge area with a television and sofas on the ground floor.  In the kitchen,  on the ground floor, there are height adjustable sinks and hobs, low storage for equipment that needs to be accessed, and all surfaces have space underneath so that wheelchair users can get right up to the surface itself. Off the side of the kitchen, the dining room boasts plenty of chairs and tables for personal arrangement, height adjustable tables, and wider grip cutlery for those who may require it. There’s a laundry room with two washers and dryers, a fridge freezer, torches and various sizes and shapes of slings to use with the hoists provided.

“There are also six bedrooms, two shower rooms, two toilet rooms and one bathroom on the ground floor, allowing sixteen people to sleep on this floor. Out of the sixteen beds (there are two four-bed rooms and four two-bed rooms on the ground floor), there are two height adjustable beds, and all beds can have cot-sides fitted to them if necessary.  There are two further bedrooms on the first floor (accessible via lift) sleeping four in each. Both have en suites, one of which has a roll-in shower and several grab rails.

“Whether you consider yourself to have a disability or not, book a stay at the Beamsley Project.  I guarantee that with such a stunning location, more equipment than you could need, and a great welcome from a lovely couple, you will not be disappointed.”

I want out of the UK –  give me guaranteed sunshine!

Then head to Barcelona, and experience sun, Catalan culture and tapas.

Martyn Sibley, co-editor of Disability Horizons, has a physical condition called Spinal Muscular Atrophy and uses an electric wheelchair. He visited Barcelona last summer to report on accessibility in the city.

It seems that Barcelona has really built on its Olympic and Paralympic legacy since hosting the games in 1992. Aside from the outstanding accessible accommodation available, there aYoung disabled man being supported into the basket of a hot air balloon re many other offerings which help to make Barcelona one of the most accessible cities in the world. Many experiences which disabled people are often completely excluded from, such as hot air balloon flights, lazy days swimming at the beach, and even visits to wine cellars can all be experienced here.

It’s not just physical impairments that have been taken into consideration either. There are a number of venues and sights that also cater for limited mobility and special needs, for example tactile and audio tours of Gaudi’s famous Temple of the Sagrada Familia, and tourist buses with audio guides and induction loops. Impressively, 80% of Barcelona’s metro system is accessible, and 100% of their buses.

Martyn says, “Barcelona is hands down, the most accessible European city that I’ve ever visited. With so much to see and do and so many facilities on offer to disabled people, I’m sure it won’t be long until I’m back to see some more of what Barcelona and Catalonia has to offer.”

We’d love to know any great accessible holiday destinations that you’ve experienced too. Please leave a comment if you have any recommendations.