Get moving with Steptember

This September we’re asking you to take part in a challenge that will boost your health and boost the ways Scope can continue to do the work that we do.

The average office worker takes around 2,500 steps a day. But according to the NHS, that average office worker should be taking a minimum of 10,000 steps today. Next month, we’re going to challenge you to reach this minimum goal.

Steptember is a fun team step challenge that encourages you to become more active while at the same time raising funds for Scope’s work. We want you to take 10,000 steps a day for 28 days in September and raise a minimum of £100 for Scope’s work.

Steptember isn’t just about steps though! We have over 60 activities encompassing a wide range of activities and other forms of mobility that can convert to “steps”. There’s an activity for almost everyone that can work toward a total.

By logging in to the Steptember website, you can not only log your steps, but you can also see your progression, receive rewards as you climb and use it to work together in a team of up to four colleagues to improve your chances.

If you’ve been looking for a reason to improve your health or even a reason to bond with colleagues, give Steptember a try!

Steptember is supported by Kris Sauders-Stowe, a fitness instructor who runs a range of wheelchair-based exercise classes called Wheely Good Fitness, and Jack Eyers, an amputee model and personal trainer who starred in Scope’s spoof of the classic Levis 1980s lauderette ad Strip for Scope.

Visit the Steptember website to sign up with a team today. You can also call 020 7619 7270 or email events@scope.org.uk to sign up.

Are you desperate for some zzzzZZs?

We are currently running a sleep appeal. Has your child ever had problems sleeping? Read more about keeping a sleep diary.

Parents of any newborns will know that sleep is a rare commodity. But did you know that 80% of disabled children experience sleep issues? And these can last for many years.

Sarah is one mum who was experiencing extreme sleep deprivation. For five years her daughter Florence, who has autism, would regularly wake up to seven times during the night. It meant Sarah was often surviving on just two hours sleep.Woman sitting on the floor looking stressed outside a child's bedroom door

“She is overtired – I am tired, stressed, angry….”

Sarah was referred to Scope’s Sleep Solutions service. Thankfully, our sleep practitioners work with disabled children and their families to find practical solutions to sleepless nights.

She was encouraged to create a new sleep routine, after learning lots of practical dos and don’ts. These included a later bed time, dimmed lights, a warm bath, pyjamas upstairs only, and some massage. It ended with the last word being said to the child:  “sleep”. Amazingly, after only three weeks, things started to drastically improve.

“The new routine needs to start later – Flo doesn’t need as much sleep as I thought!”

Sarah kept a diary during the sleep programme, and here’s how she got on…

Week 1

Handritten sleep diary that shows how many times  the child was getting up during the night for the first week of the sleep programme, seven in some cases“I am so tired….I called Maxine, and she kept me going.”

Week 2

Handwritten sleep diary for week two of the sleep programme, says "Feel a lot better already, is this actually working?!"

“Straight back to bed, no engaging in conversation, give her a kiss, tuck her in, and last word is ‘sleep!'”

Week 3

Sleep diary that has much improved sleeping patterns from the child, and says "I feel like I have my energy back!"

“I feel like I have my energy back!”

You can watch our film featuring Sarah to hear more about how she got on.

Did you find this information useful? Please donate to our sleep appeal so that more families of disabled children can get the support they need. 

If you need any sleep tips, or have any tips you’d like to share with other parents, visit our online community.