Landie, a young disabled man, smiles as he operates a digital camera

“YouTube is really great for talking about disability” Landie, vlogger and entrepreneur

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This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Joe Land AKA Landie is a 19 year-old video blogger (vlogger) who also owns a business called Social Land. Joe has hypotonia which affects his muscles.

As part of our 30 Under 30 campaign, Joe talks about his passion for making and editing YouTube videos, starting a business, attitudes online and gives some tips for anyone who wants to start vlogging.

My interests and hobbies involve spending a lot of time making and editing YouTube videos. I especially enjoy the editing side of it. When you edit a video and it looks good and you’re proud of it, it’s a nice feeling.

Attitudes to disability on YouTube

When I first started making YouTube videos, people didn’t know I was a wheelchair-user at that point. The reason I didn’t say anything was because it didn’t really matter. But then, when I started to vlog, you could quite blatantly see that I use a wheelchair.

My followers’ attitudes didn’t really change. If they do bring it up, that’s fine, they’re just curious. If someone asks what’s wrong with me or asks questions – I see that as a good thing. The worst thing is when I’m out or something and there are just some people you can just tell are a little bit awkward. They obviously want to ask a question but they don’t. I just hate that. That’s the one thing that really annoys me because I don’t want people to feel awkward.

Landie, a young disabled man in a wheelchair, sits in front of two computer screens and is editing a movie in advanced software

The reactions to the videos I’ve made about disability have actually been the best I’ve got. The videos have around 200 views but 40 comments which is a lot in comparison. People respond to it really well and it makes people ask questions.

I think the videos are quite good at making people be honest with you and interact with you because I’m making the video about it and I’m clearly not trying to hide anything. People quite like personal videos and that’s about as personal as it gets isn’t it really?

My tips for vlogging

The advice I would give to someone who is thinking about vlogging is don’t make it false. There’s nothing worse than when you watch peoples’ videos and you can quite clearly tell that that’s not who they actually are and that they’re trying to copy someone. Getting inspiration from someone is good but when people try to flat out copy, it’s just really cringey.

I use a Canon DSLR which is perfect for filming vlogs where I’m sitting still. But to be honest, you can definitely just vlog using your smartphone. If you are out and about, vlogging on your phone camera is ideal, especially with something like an iPhone 6 onwards.

People really worry about being awkward in front of a camera but, as long as you just act normal, it’s not going to seem awkward for the people watching it. If you worry too much about how you’re coming across, you can give the wrong impression. Don’t do it if you just want to get the subscribers because it doesn’t work like that. You’ve got to enjoy it to get the subscribers!

Landie, a young disabled man in a wheelchair, films himself using a digital camera

Joe is sharing his story as part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Catch up on all the stories so far on our 30 under 30 page.

To see and hear more from Joe visit his YouTube channel.