“You never have a bad day at Scope!” – National Volunteers’ Week

Volunteering with Scope led to an unexpected change of career for Lisa. As we conclude our celebrations for National Volunteers’ Week, she talks about what it’s like to be a Scope volunteer and how it changed her life.

What inspired you to become a Scope volunteer?

I was originally a customer at the Scope shop in Lincoln and was asked if I was interested in becoming a volunteer. I wanted to help with the window displays, so decided to get involved. I was nervous as I hadn’t worked in a retail environment before, but the existing volunteers were really friendly and quickly showed me the ropes.

After a little while a vacancy came up in the shop, and I took on a paid role as a Sunday manager. This progressed to me taking on extra responsibilities and around two years ago I became the shop manager.

A shop window display

How have your experiences at Scope changed your life?

I thought my career was heading in a particular direction, but both my area manager and the team at the shop encouraged me to apply for the shop manager role. That gave me the confidence to really go for it. My team are lovely and have been very supportive. They really helped me when I started in my role.

Five years ago, I would never have imagined myself doing this job, but this change has been really good for me. Volunteering at Scope helped to improve my confidence and changed my career path for the better. I’ve had an amazing experience at Scope, I don’t want it to end!

What’s been the most memorable moment of your time with Scope?

I have one almost every day! My team likes to have fun and we do things that are a bit different. For example, we took over the local museum and held a fashion show there.

The volunteers I work with are amazing. In the last couple of years, we’ve helped nearly 30 of our volunteers get in to work. We support them through their training, give them time and support, they even do mock interviews with each other during their breaks. Some local shops now come to us directly when they’re looking for new staff as they know how well we train and support our volunteers.

Scope means a lot to me and I love what I do. It’s such a positive place, you never have a bad day at Scope!

Would you recommend volunteering with Scope to others?

Definitely yes! We’re all about encouraging and supporting our volunteers, and getting them to achieve their ambitions. Volunteering with Scope gives you confidence. We’re like a family and we’re always there for each other.

Fancy giving it a go? Are you interested in becoming a Scope volunteer? More information on volunteering with Scope, and ways in which you can get involved, can be found on our volunteering pages.

He’s the Paralympic hopeful who’s taking the athletic world by storm – Souleyman

30 under 30 logo

This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Souleyman is a 16 year old runner. He’s visually impaired but that hasn’t held him back – it just means he needs to find a different way of doing things. He recently took part in the Junior Paralympics and won gold.

As part of our 30 Under 30 campaign, he spoke to us about his love of running and competing, overcoming barriers and how he’s working towards the 2020 Paralympics.

Ever since I was young I really enjoyed competing. I always used to win races in primary school. I enjoyed sports day, I enjoyed all kinds of races at the park with my friends and it turned into a passion. In year 7 at high school my teacher said “you have a talent, you should join a club”. So I joined a club and started getting better.

The British Athletics Paralympics selected me to do the School Games, which is also known as the Junior Paralympics. This was in November last year and I won gold. I’ve competed for my club, Kingston, but to be at a major championship, it was a great experience. And Brazil itself was cool. The sun was out all day, it was warm, the people were amazing, and the vibe was so good.

I didn’t expect to be at that level so to actually come away being the world number one was a huge shock. I knew I was decent but I didn’t know I was that good. All my family and my friends were so buzzed, they were like “You’re going to be the next Usain Bolt”. Another door has opened, and it’s just a case of seeing where that can go.

Souleyman on the running track, smiling at the camera, hands on hips

Getting to the 2020 Paralympics

Competing at the 2020 Paralympics in Tokyo is my main goal. My coach and I sat down and made a plan of what we’re going to do, how we’re going to get there. Before then there are championships like the Europeans, Commonwealth and World Championships – all these other competitions that I can compete at.

Wherever you hear “Olympics” you also hear “Paralympics” so there’s been a huge shift. It’s being acknowledged in society and people are seeing that disabled people can do the same things that non-disabled people can do. They just need to do it in a different way.

Souleyman running on the track

Overcoming challenges and attitudes

The way my visual impairment works – I can’t see through one eye, and the other eye is tunnel vision, so I don’t see what’s around me in my peripheral vision. It makes it hard to stay in my lane and see who’s next to me and how fast I should be running. I can see straight ahead, which is good for the 100m. But you need to see who’s beside you to judge your pace. It is very difficult in all areas of life.

People’s attitudes are quite frustrating. For some reason they think because I have a visual impairment or a disability I’m not cognitively able to do things. I’m not stupid, I just can’t see! I’m a huge believer in whatever you can imagine for yourself, you can achieve it. It’s about finding what needs to be overcome. Especially with me, with my visual impairment, I’ve never thought there’s something I can’t do. I can do it, but I have to find an alternative way of doing it.

Souleyman laughing and pouring a bottle of water over his head

Inspiring others

In athletics I want to achieve as much as possible. Whether it’s winning gold, getting a world record or being a role model for other people. After I won at the School Games in Brazil, visually impaired people and disabled people contacted me and said “It’s amazing what you’ve achieved as a young disabled person and you’ve inspired me” which is something I never thought I’d hear. That just made me want to push harder.

Souleyman is sharing his story as part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Read more from our #30toWatch on our website.