Young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to in their lives

Today we launch Leading my life my way, a new research report looking at young disabled people’s experiences of using support services to live independently.

We carried out this research because we wanted to find out what young disabled people expect from care and support services, what their experiences are and to what extent they are supported in different areas of their lives.

Our research shows that young disabled people don’t have sufficient control over their care and support plans and consequently in major decisions affecting their lives.

With this in mind, we designed our research to ensure young disabled people’s experiences and opinions were at the centre, through a series of face to face and telephone interviews as well as a wider survey of disabled people aged 17 to 30.

Young disabled people want to do all the things that every young adult does. But the social care system is letting them down and holding them back in many crucial areas of their life.  This is leading to social exclusion and affecting young disabled people’s wellbeing.

Support with personal care

While access to support is a significant barrier faced by young disabled people, our research found a much more widespread issue of being able to access to support in other areas like employment. Of respondents to our survey, 60 per cent said they aren’t getting the support they need to get into work.

Decision making

A quarter of our survey respondents said that they are either only ‘slightly’ or ‘not at all’ involved in making decisions relating to their care and support plan. This highlights a worrying lack of choice and control young disabled people have in making decisions about how they live their lives.

Information and advice

Our research also found that information and advice services could be improved to better serve the needs and expectations of young disabled people. While a fifth of our respondents would like to access information and advice on smartphone apps, only one per cent are currently able to.

The impact of poor quality information and advice was clear in interviews we conducted with respondents, with many instances of young disabled people not knowing how or where to access meaningful support in areas such as finding a job, managing support using direct payments and finding the right place to live.

Daily activities

A lack of support beyond daily living activities can result in a negative impact on young disabled people’s wellbeing.

Of the young disabled people we surveyed, a majority had experienced a significant setback in their lives such as not getting a college place or somewhere they wanted to live.

Text reads: Two thirds of respondents have had significant social care setbacks that have stopped them living indpendtly. 82 percenthad to wait at least six months for a solution

Of these people, 82 per cent had not had this resolved within six months, despite this being an obligation of local authorities under the Care Act. Such experiences are resulting in many young disabled people feeling that their lives are on hold while they struggle for resolution in specific areas of their lives.

Our research provides evidence that many young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to in their lives.

This is a denial of opportunity resulting in many young disabled people feeling they are being left behind while non-disabled friends and relatives leave home, progress in work, continue in education, play an active role in their communities and develop relationships. If we don’t get social care support right then the huge amount of potential young disabled people have in these areas could be wasted.

The Government needs to look beyond funding support for the ‘basics’ in social care and ensure young disabled people are supported to live independently in all areas of their lives.

Read more about our work to improve social care on our website.

One thought on “Young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to in their lives”

  1. Sadly this is not just confined to the younger adults. With care packages being slashed sometimes it is hard to support the basic everyday needs let alone the special events and activities. A lot of it is dependent on carers and how far they are willing to go. I regularly spend hours of my own time researching opportunity to take to service users and move around shifts to optimise support but many can’t do this or won’t (many companies discourage shift changes). It is a case of carers getting minimum wage, not enough hours to do the support needed, and if they want to do any extra than the basics it coming out of thier own time and quite often pocket

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