“Fix science fiction, not the disability!”

Deane Saunders-Stowe is a science fiction author whose debut novel, ‘Synthesis:Weave’, introduced a disabled main character.

In this blog, Deane talks about how science fiction often looks to ‘fix’ disability and how he wants to challenge the genre and bring something new to the table.

Alien worlds, sophisticated space stations, high powered laser weapons – but not a wheelchair, guide dog or hand-signing gesture in sight.

Science fiction has a problem with disability – it wants to fix it. With my partner, Kris, being a wheelchair user, I have a problem with that!

I believe fiction should provide role models and characters with which the reader can empathise rather than sympathise. If these characters are disabled, this should not be the focus. It should simply be an aspect of a character’s life, not their defining trait.

Above all, fiction should not attempt to ‘fix’ disability. It’s all too tempting to do this in futuristic sci-fi, simply because it’s the way technology is progressing and it requires less imagination to deal with. Prosthetics will become like real limbs, many medical problems will be solved and genetic therapy will cure many debilitating conditions.

Fixing disability tells readers that it is a negative. Disabled readers can feel betrayed if characters they enjoy suddenly lose their disability.

Instead, fiction should show positive ways in which disability can be dealt with creatively, or give characters insights or ways of solving problems that their non-disabled counterparts may not have.

Time to redress the balance

Inspired by my partner, who has a degenerative knee condition, I set about writing a novel to redress the balance. In ‘Synthesis:Weave’ I introduce Aryx Trevarian, a double amputee wheelchair user.

Aryx doesn’t feel as though he has to adapt to fit in with society. Society should adapt to accommodate him – and quite right, too! There aren’t only humans in the story, but a variety of alien body shapes and capabilities, and certainly no excuse not to put ramps and elevators everywhere.

A man sits in a wheelchair with holographic prosthetic legs and an alien looking device sitting on his lap
A promo image of Aryx, the disabled character in Synthesis:Weave

Fiction is all about tension, conflict, and plot twists. Conflict can be internal or external, emotional or physical and arises from a character’s desires being at odds with the reality of what they can achieve. If a character achieves their goals easily, there’s no conflict. If they do it quickly, there’s no tension.

With Aryx as an amputee wheelchair user, I knew there would be plenty of conflict and challenges that he would face on his journey. He’s comfortable in his role as an engineer, but his desire to do more would collide with his capabilities when a greater burden is placed upon him. Even though his home environment is adapted to his needs, he is aware that if he wishes to go farther afield he must change himself. To this end, he develops a prosthetic backpack that has its own drawbacks.

If I fixed his disability, readers would no longer relate to him, nor be able to see him as a realistic inspiration for them to overcome their own challenges. So whilst he can use his prosthetics in certain circumstances, he still uses his wheelchair throughout the book.

Don’t make assumptions

If you’re a writer wishing to use disability in a story, rather than make assumptions about disabilities and their impact on daily life as many people do, it’s important to get feedback from people living with those conditions, ensuring you can push boundaries without being insensitive. Ask people how they may deal with certain situations – you may be surprised at the creative and interesting ways people adapt.

I discovered this myself whilst writing the short story Synthesis:Pioneer, in which I had to pay special attention to all of the sensory descriptions I could use.

Above all, write with respect, give strong role models and provide an experience that is enjoyable for everyone.

To find out more about the Synthesis series, follow Deane on Twitter or like his Facebook page. You can also head to Deane’s website to find out more about his books.

Deane is currently working on the sequel to ‘Synthesis:Weave’ which he hopes will be finished late 2017 to early 2018. In the meantime, you can read the short story, ‘Synthesis:Pioneer’, free on Amazon.

“Meeting new people and helping others – that’s my secret”

Scope volunteer Ethel Davey is due to celebrate her 100th birthday on 30 July. She has been volunteering at the Scope shop in St Albans for over twenty years, and has no intention of stopping yet.

I like to meet people and volunteering with Scope is a great way to do that. I’ve been at the St Albans shop since it opened nearly 21 years ago. I was in town doing my shopping and a lady asked me if I’d like to come and volunteer. I said I’d give it a go and I’ve been coming back ever since.

Everyone in town knows Ethel

I try to keep busy and I like helping people. As well as volunteering, I go to clubs where they have speakers and lunches. I used to help run the Scout jumble sales. I’ve been in St Albans a long time, so I know a lot of people. I go to the market and everyone knows me. That’s what I like, a friendly atmosphere.

I’m from Watford originally, I only came to St Albans in 1939. I left school at 14, you didn’t have to pass any exams in those days. I started work in an office, then went on to work in an envelope factory. I was there for six years until I got married. I used to cycle six miles to work and back every day. I like exercise and I think that’s one of the things that keeps me going today.

The war broke out the day after we got married. Everyone used to say that’s what caused it! While my husband was serving overseas in the army, I worked on the milk round. I really enjoyed it as I got to know everyone in the area.

Charity shops have changed

I haven’t stopped since then, and still do a couple of shifts a week at the Scope shop. Nowadays I mainly do the till and help with tidying up on the shop floor. Fortunately, I’m alright on the arithmetic, and can keep an eye out for thieves.

Old lady standing in a scope shop with a Scope bib on
Ethel, a volunteer in the St Albans Scope charity shop

I’ve seen a lot of strange donations come in over the years. You’d be surprised what you see in some of the bags! We do get a lot of designer stuff donated these days. We get customers who come in just to pick up designer bargains. We have a lot of younger customers now too – charity shops don’t have the same image they used to have. We often get young people volunteering with us as part of their Duke of Edinburgh award. Volunteering can help people get in to work, it’s a job getting a job these days.

Volunteering is a great way to meet people

I went paragliding in my seventies, and I’ve taken a helicopter ride over the Grand Canyon. I’ve done most things I wanted to do, and have done a fair bit of travelling.

I’ve got a few plans for my birthday. I have a big family – three children, eight grandchildren and sixteen great grandchildren, so I’m having three parties. That’s one more than the queen!

Scope do an awful lot of good. Volunteering in my local Scope shop means that I get to meet a lot of different people, and that’s what I like. Local communities are a good thing, if anyone needs a bit of extra help, we help each other out, that’s what the world’s for.

If you’re feeling inspired by Ethel’s story, take a look at how to get involved as a Scope volunteer.

Read more about Ethel in her recent newspaper feature.

England’s amputee football star – How wearable tech makes my life easier

Martin is a 25 year-old who works at Lancashire Sport Partnership and plays for the England Amputee Football Team. He also features in Barclaycard’s new Pay Your Way campaign to promote their contactless wearable devices.

In this blog he talks about his journey to representing the national team and how wearable technology has made his life outside of football a lot easier.

Sport has always been my passion.

Representing my country has been my proudest achievement, but the road hasn’t always been steady. I first had cancer at four, and then again at 15, that’s how I lost my leg.

Male amputee standing with crutches in football kit at football ground
Martin Heald at football training ground

It started with a pain behind my left knee. My GP said it was a cyst. It went away and came back. It turned out to be cancer. I went through a year of chemo and had my leg amputated.

My mum was very supportive and stayed with me at the hospital.

But challenges are there to be conquered, and it’s now my tenth year in the England Amputee Football Team.

My team mates are like family to me and football has given me the strength to be the person I am today.

How I got into Amputee Football

I was at the limb centre getting my prosthetic, and saw a magazine with a picture of amputee football. It was only like a quarter of a page. From there my dad got in touch with the Amputee Football Association who invited me down to see what it was all about. The team were so welcoming and encouraged me to start.

When I first started there was only really one team in the North West, and that was in Manchester. It was a small team, I travelled every week with my dad to train with them. It was those people who really got me into it and helped me improve.

Before I lost my leg, I didn’t really do that much sport, unless skateboarding counts? And I guess I’m now always looking for that buzz. And football really gives me that.

Every time, no matter how many times you play, you still get that buzz when you walk out onto the pitch and sing the England National Anthem with your team mates.

How wearable technology has helped

When I lost my leg it was quite a big deal. I didn’t really want to do stuff at the time. But my mum was there, giving me a push to get out there and do things.

I work full time, I coach and play football as well. So I’m always very busy. I’m always looking for ways to make my life easier. Using contactless wearables to pay really helps.

Contactless devices like Barclaycard wearables definitely make life easier, especially when I’m on crutches. It means I don’t have to stop to get my wallet out. The pay fob on my keys is especially useful because I always have it with me when I drive.

My wristband is keeping me on the move. It means I literally don’t have to have anything on me.

I’ve overcome many obstacles in my life. The next one is winning the European Championship with England.

Disabled football player sitting at a table in club house
Martin Heald with friends in the club house

It’s hugely encouraging to see leading brands like Barclaycard developing accessible products, and including disabled people as part of their flagship advertising campaigns to promote these products.

Disabled people and their families have a combined spending power of over £200 billion a year. We hope this step by Barclaycard encourages other leading brands to recognise the importance of diversity and put more disabled people at the heart of their campaigns.

Find our more about the value of the purple pound.

Let’s celebrate a summer of sport for all

There has been a definite buzz of excitement in the Scope office as London hosted the World Para Athletics Championships. Over a thousand athletes from over 85 countries competed and it was clear everyone was behind them. The event boasted the largest audiences in world Para sport championship history outside of the Paralympic Games.

Our athletes won a staggering 39 medals, placing Great Britain third in the medal table.  #TeamScope were cheering them on all the way. If you missed out on the buzz, check out what was happening during the event over on Twitter.

It’s not over yet

The event may have drawn to a close, but there’s still work to be done.

Last year, disabled people told us they felt attitudes towards them had begun to change after London 2012. 72% believed the games had helped to lift the negative attitudes they all too often experience. However, they also told us that over half of them regularly experienced discrimination.

A group of Scope staff standing outside the Olympic stadium in London
Some of Team Scope at the Olympic Stadium

#SportForAll

As part of our mission for everyday equality, we are going to be running a ‘Sport For All’ series to encourage better representation of disability in sport, as well as challenging attitudes towards disability.

You can expect new research, blogs, videos and social media events. These will showcase some of the best athletes and storytellers involved in disability sport today.

To get you started, read Sascha Kindred’s blog on how he thinks disability sport can help combat negative attitudes.

How you can get involved

Tell us what sport means to you

If you’re a disabled person, let us know what sport means to you. Just tweet us (@scope) with a photo, video or tweet using the hashtag #SportForAll.

Like, comment and share

There will be loads of exciting content coming your way so make sure you stay tuned, like, comment and share! Look out for video and blog content on our social media channels, our blog and in the ‘Everybody’ series on Huffington Post.

Make a difference

Support us fundraisers this year in accessible events such as The Superhero Triathlon and Parallel London. Find out more about our full list of challenge events.

It’s clear that sport has the power to bring us together and sporting events have the power to change people’s attitudes.

However, we all have the power to ensure that disability is celebrated and championed all year round, not just during events like the World Para Athletics Championships or the Paralympics.

It makes good business sense to be accessible

Cerrie Burnell is a children’s author and actress changing attitudes towards disability through raising the profile of diversity. In this blog, she talks about why we need better representation of disabled people in the media, marketing campaigns and the public eye.

The household spend of disabled people amounts to more than £240 billion a year.

I’m not a person with a keen mathematical mind. 240 billion is a number I find almost unfathomable, like gazing at a clear night sky and trying to count stars, whilst simultaneously sipping wine – where would it end. But it’s not a fathomless figure, it’s a very real amount, and yet every year like stars at dawn, this amount of money slips away almost unnoticed by the marketing industry.

Why? Because the spending power of the disabled community has not been fully recognised. And more importantly positive representation has not been maximised. At all. The Pink pound, and The Grey pound are becoming part of our everyday life, and have landed firmly on the radar of marketers and boardroom bosses. Now, we have started to hear more about the Purple pound.

The purple pound

Purple. It’s the colour of mischief and regal gowns, and whilst it makes me think of the velvet curtains of grand theatres about to unleash drama on the world, it also holds a sense of rebellion. It’s not a colour that’s easily forgotten. I’m not entirely convinced that colour coding society by potential for spending is healthy, but it’s necessary for a brand to know who their customer is and as a member of the disabled community I have as much right to be that customer as anyone else. If labelling our money as purple achieves this, so be it. Money like people has the same value regardless of colour.

Britain’s 13 million disabled people have recently been recognised for their spending power, and now accessible products and services are being developed each day by big brands. But the disabled community aren’t solely interested in seeking out accessible products, we’re already spending money on regular products from well established brands. A wheel chair user may still want to wear stilettos. A person who is hearing impaired may want to buy headphones. Someone who is visually impaired might only wear Chanel Lipstick because it’s the shade their Grandmother wore. We are not separate from the rest of society, we are part of society, we are within the fold. Yet that’s not how we’re portrayed.

So, whilst it’s positive to see businesses starting to recognise the disposable income, that previously untapped consumers spend on retail, leisure, travel and in my case Malibu, Havaianas and ridiculously over-priced yoga leggings. What’s needed is more diversity to promote products (and services) as we also look to challenge attitudes around disability.

Getting representation in the media

Thankfully over the last few years we’ve seen brands like Smirnoff and Maltesers lead the way and feature disabled talent in their advertising. This is like a huge gasp of fresh air to me. And I’m delighted that following their campaign during last year’s Paralympics, Mars, the owner of Maltesers, has achieved much more beyond ticking the diversity box.

The adverts – a series of three commercials featuring awesome disabled talent, which I thought were both coy and hilarious – received so much positive feedback that Maltesers are now looking to extend the campaign to other markets. The largest of which being the United States and Canada. Which is great news and is exactly what we need to see more of! Bring it on.

But, more importantly for disabled people, this isn’t just about profit margins and big business. This is about us getting the representation we truly deserve. The fastest way to tackle negativity, discrimination, fear or even just insecurity is through genuinely inclusive media. Featuring underrepresented groups on our TV screens, telling diverse stories in books, newspapers and magazines is key to changing attitudes more widely.

Most disabled people still don’t feel they are well-represented in the media

At present, only 2.5% of all characters on TV screens are disabled. Eight in ten (81%) disabled people do not feel they are well-represented on TV. Shocker! That’s because we’re not, but this can very easily change. With the massive value of the purple pound looming like a spell of spending joy, big brands can promote disability whilst benefiting financially. Nobody is going to do it because it’s simply the right thing to do, it must be good business sense – and thanks to our spending power it is. Watch out world. The futures bright, the futures purple.

Cerrie supports Scope and with our mission to achieve everyday equality, so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else.

Visit our website to find out more about our work and how you can support us.

“We had never thought about disability seriously until Oliver was born”

Chris is taking part in RideLondon for Scope next weekend. When his son, Oliver, was born with an undiagnosed condition, Chris didn’t know who to turn to for support.

We had never thought about disability seriously until Oliver was born. Oliver has an undiagnosed genetic condition which has certain physical manifestations. He was born with fused fingers and he has a cleft palate. He has some other conditions and a severe learning disability but it’s quite hard to describe. If your child has Cerebral Palsy or something that has a name, then you know where to go because there are people who will support you for that.

Oliver, a young child wearing glasses, smiles

We’ve also found out that Oliver is very strongly on the autistic spectrum as well. This came as quite a surprise to us because he has a very good sense of humour. He is very naughty but not in a bad way. He is incredibly cheeky. At school, he will quite often wait until his teacher is looking at him and then he’ll knock something off the table and he knows that he shouldn’t do it but he just has this glimpse in his eye while he does it and he makes everyone fall in love with him.

He is an outrageous flirt, no seriously, its dreadful, in a good way. He has a filthy laugh and this wonderful grin. What he will do, particularly with women, is just look you in the eye, give you this grin and suddenly you’ll forgive him for anything. You really do.

He has a lust for life

Oliver is going through a really good stage at the moment. He just has a lust for life . He wants to be in everything. He’s just started walking in the last few months which is great, charging all over the place, getting into all sorts of trouble. What is so nice about it for us is that he is getting into all the trouble that toddlers get into. It’s that ‘oh god Oliver stop doing it’, but then its ‘oh how wonderful’. This is what he’s meant to be doing given his stage of development.

He’s got loads of friends at school which is nice. Even though he’s totally non-verbal, he just seems to have a way with him about charming people. He loves any motorised transport so he gets incredibly excited whenever he sees busses or trains or helicopters. He does what we call his jazz hands when he sees them. He does that a lot and that’s a sign of when he’s excited.

He loves being in the car, loves being on the move. He’s quite partial to waving to everybody who sees him and then he just sees how many people wave back.

Chris with his son, Oliver. They are sitting on some steps on a beach.
Chris and his son Oliver sitting on the beach

The support from Scope has been invaluable

Scope offers such a broad variety of support and information. When you’re not sure where to go next, information is what you really want. Sometimes you just want to be signposted to an expert. Sometimes you want very specific things and sometimes you just want to know that someone else is there. That’s actually really important, just knowing that someone is there and they get it.

I’m a pushy little proud parent and I want Oliver to achieve everything that he is capable of achieving. I want to make sure that he has every opportunity in life to do everything he can.

Joining #TeamScope for RideLondon

I’ve done Ride London twice before and it’s so much fun doing it because it’s completely closed roads. It’s such a brilliant experience.

The support from #TeamScope has been really nice and the Facebook group is a nice idea. When you go past the point and you hear people cheering, it does give you a boost, and you feel part of something. I go out cycling for health and fitness, but Ride London gives me a focus and something to build up to. It also gives me the opportunity to do a bit of good as well.

I just worry that without organisations like Scope, opportunities for disabled people, like Oliver, are going to get taken away. Scope have been there for our family when we’ve needed support and I want to make sure that they are there for many years to come.

Join #TeamScope today to ensure that support and information is there for families like Chris and Oliver’s. Whether it’s running, swimming, cycling or trekking, we have charity events for everyone.

Find out more about the events that we have on offer.

2017 AbilityNet Tech4Good Awards

Now in its seventh year, the AbilityNet Tech4Good Awards is one of the most inspiring events of the year. It shows the incredible capacity of technology to improve all our lives. There were over 200 brilliant and life-changing projects to choose from but here are some of my favourites that improve the lives of disabled people:

AbilityNet Accessibility Award winner: Bristol Braille Technology

Bristol Braille Technology is building a revolutionary and radically affordable Braille e-reader called Canute, designed with and by the blind community. The world’s first multiple line Braille e-reader will launch by 2018 and it is hoped will be around 20 times cheaper than existing digital Braille devices.

BT Connected Society Award winner: Sky Badger

Sky Badger logo with animated cape
Sky Badger logo

Sky Badger finds educational, medical, financial and social support for families with disabled children all over the UK. Over the last five years, Sky Badger has supported over one million disabled children and their families. Sky Badger puts the emphasis on having fun.

Digital Health Award winner: Fizzyo

Both of Vicky Coxhead’s sons have Cystic Fibrosis and because of this they have to do an hour’s breathing exercises every day to keep infections at bay. She applied to feature on a BBC2 documentary The Big Life Fix and was introduced to Haiyan Zhang, Innovation Director at Microsoft Research in Cambridge. She enlisted the help of Creative Technologist Greg Saul to create a device that could take the boys’ breaths and turn them into controls for a videogame. Combining gaming with saving lives proves a potent mix – see Fizzyo.

Digital Skills Award winner: FabFarm

FabFarm participants
FabFarm participants

FabFarm is a digital aquaponic farm that is designed, built and operated as a social enterprise by disabled students in Derry, Northern Ireland. Developed by the Nerve Centre, FabLab, it uses new and emerging technologies to help empower, engage and inspire 20 young people with special educational needs to develop new skills which are directly focused upon their employability in the digital marketplace.

There were so many other great projects that were shortlisted and deserve a mention:

AutonoMe is a support system that combines the power of video and mobile technology to help people with learning difficulties through everyday tasks.

Optikey is a new assistive on-screen keyboard, designed to be used with low-cost eye-tracking devices. It brings keyboard control, mouse control and speech to people with motor and speech limitations.

Signvideo  British Sign Language (BSL) video interpreting services can help deaf people communicate easily and professionally over the telephone or face-to-face, with hearing colleagues. Signvideo offers instant access to an experienced, qualified video interpreter within minutes, via PC or Mac, tablet or smartphone.

Read about the 2016 Tech4Good awards.

Read about Scope’s partnership with AbilityNet.

“We all want to be a part of society don’t we?” Addressing loneliness in disabled people

Yesterday we attended the launch of Sense’s report for the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness. Their research found that over half of disabled people (53 per cent) say they feel lonely, which rises to 77 per cent for young disabled people. In this blog Scope storyteller and autism advocate, Carly Jones, shares her experiences and ideas for change.

I was really honoured to be invited by Scope to come to this event. As Jo Cox so eloquently put it when she was alive, you think of loneliness and you think of older people, we don’t think of children and young adults. But I know from my personal experience, and the autistic community as a whole, that we are extremely isolated.

My experiences of loneliness

I didn’t get my autism diagnosis until I was 32. You can read more about it in my last blog for Scope. I remember feeling very different at school. I was really anxious. I started realising that I never got invited to birthday parties. I was pretty aware by the time I was in my late 20s that I was autistic, but without a diagnosis it was like being in “no man’s land”.

When I finally got my diagnosis, I filmed it with the help of the National Autistic Society so that no-one else would have to go through this alone, because I felt so alone.

Getting my diagnosis changed things for the better because I could start going to autistic events without feeling like a fraud.  My advocacy work has really helped me find people who understand disability or other autistic people who just get it because they’re autistic too, and you can become friends. So my advocacy work has actually been my social life line. People say “Oh you’re so selfless” and I’m like “No, doing this helps me get out of the house and meet people too!”

Carly smiling with Mel and Juliet from Scope
Carly Jones with Scope staff

Three ideas to address loneliness in disabled people

Better representation in the media: If there’s an autistic person on TV usually it’s a boy who’s about 8-years-old and into trains! It’s really not helping. It’s isolating the thousands of autistic women and girls in the UK who are struggling to have their needs met in everyday society. We need a autistic girl in a big show like Eastenders, who has challenges but strong and sassy.

The education system needs to improve:  Schools need to be more holistic in their approach to difference and really nurture talent. You get awards for being good at maths but what about the artists, the philosophers, the big thinkers, the social entrepreneurs?

I had a really difficult time at school because I struggled with the environment, but teachers just thought I was being naughty. When your needs are not being met it can lead to mental health problems and vulnerability. A lot of the children who come to the events are home educated because they’re not “autistic enough” for a Special Educational Needs (SEN) school but they can’t get the support they need in mainstream school. That can be incredibly isolating too.

More social opportunities: I run a bi-weekly group for young autistic people.  The stereotype is that we never get invited to things so, with the events that I put on, we go to some really cool places and they can invite whoever they like – autistic, disabled, non-disabled. Hopefully their friends will then grow up not seeing autism as this stigmatised thing but thinking “I had an autistic friend in school and we did some really cool things”.

Adults need better groups too. Sometimes you’ll see events for autistic adults and it’s just basically what you would have for a child but for an older audience. You know, we are cool, quite cool and we are adults in our own right and we are responsible people. I think if there were more clubs – which are affordable – there would be more opportunities to meet people.

woman standing in front of a poster holding a magazine
Carly Jones, Autism Advocate

We all want to be a part of society don’t we?

It was fantastic to be at this event. I’ve already got so many emails in my mind that I want to send! Everybody genuinely wanted to hear other people’s stories. The fact that it’s cross party, cross charity, working together, is really fantastic. We all want to be a part of society don’t we? As someone said, it’s not a 10 year solution, it’s more like 40 year solution, but I’m hopeful that we’ll get there.

From 10 July to 13 August, Sense will be leading a coalition of disability organisations, including Scope, to shine a spotlight on the issue of loneliness for disabled people and the steps that we can all take to help tackle it. Head to the website to find out how you can get involved.

If you have a story you would like to share, get in touch with Scope’s stories team. 

Changing the attitudes of the next generation

Meet Mary, one of Scope’s disabled role models. Mary goes into schools to talk to kids about her experience of school, bullying and disability.

Thanks to supporters like you, we plan to reach more school children this year with Scope Role Models, tackling bullying and changing the attitudes of the next generation. 

Bullying hurts

If you were unlucky enough to be bullied as a child, you’ll know how miserable it can make you feel. When everyone is laughing at you, you feel completely alone, and the pain stays with you – sometimes for the rest of your life.

That’s how it was for me. I went to a school with over a thousand students and I stood out – all 4 foot 1 inches of me. There was no place to hide and it was exhausting – emotionally and physically – dealing with so many people who regularly wanted to make fun of you.

Yes, I was the butt of every joke. The bullies thought it was okay to laugh at Mary because they thought, ‘Mary’s not like us. Mary doesn’t have feelings’. But I did.

I went through so much pain, heartache and loneliness. I don’t think I would have had depression as an adult if I hadn’t been bullied as a child.  That’s why I can’t live with the fact that disabled children are twice as likely to be bullied as their non-disabled classmates.

I don’t want another child to experience the constant hurt that I went through

Thanks to supporters like you, we can change the attitudes of the next generation with Scope Role Models. We work with children in schools, because that’s where bullying happens, and that’s where kids form opinions that last for life.

I don’t mind telling you it was daunting the first time I stepped back into a school. The painful memories came flooding back, but the children made it worthwhile. It’s exciting to see their attitudes change in front of you. I’ve found that children are like sponges – they soak up the new ideas I share with them about disabled people, then go out and deliver that message to family and friends.

I just wish we could do more. And we need to do more, because bullying is still going on in schools around the country.

Scope is taking action thanks to your donations

As a Scope Role Model, I want children to understand the pain bullying causes. I want them to understand discrimination has its roots in ignorance. But I also want to share a positive message – and get them thinking about the friendships they miss out on with their disabled classmates.

I just wish there had been something like Scope Role Models when I was in school. It might have spared me a lot of pain, and even changed the course of my life. So I am determined to help get this life changing programme into every school.

Putting a stop to discrimination

Your support is helping disabled children who are dreading going to school because they can’t face another day of being picked on. And together we can change the future, because I’m sure, like me, you want disabled people to have equal opportunities in our society. But that won’t happen if disabled children are bullied in school, and if their non-disabled classmates follow the same path as previous generations. They’ll feel awkward around disabled people, they’ll avoid and exclude us – they’ll discriminate against us.

Thank you so much for your support, without you Scope wouldn’t be able to tackle bullying in such an effective way.

Our goal is to reach 2,500 young people through Scope Role Models this year – so if you can, please send an extra gift today to help change the attitudes of the next generation towards disabled people.