Male amputee sitting on a wooden bench in a gym

England’s amputee football star – How wearable tech makes my life easier

Martin is a 25 year-old who works at Lancashire Sport Partnership and plays for the England Amputee Football Team. He also features in Barclaycard’s new Pay Your Way campaign to promote their contactless wearable devices.

In this blog he talks about his journey to representing the national team and how wearable technology has made his life outside of football a lot easier.

Sport has always been my passion.

Representing my country has been my proudest achievement, but the road hasn’t always been steady. I first had cancer at four, and then again at 15, that’s how I lost my leg.

Male amputee standing with crutches in football kit at football ground
Martin Heald at football training ground

It started with a pain behind my left knee. My GP said it was a cyst. It went away and came back. It turned out to be cancer. I went through a year of chemo and had my leg amputated.

My mum was very supportive and stayed with me at the hospital.

But challenges are there to be conquered, and it’s now my tenth year in the England Amputee Football Team.

My team mates are like family to me and football has given me the strength to be the person I am today.

How I got into Amputee Football

I was at the limb centre getting my prosthetic, and saw a magazine with a picture of amputee football. It was only like a quarter of a page. From there my dad got in touch with the Amputee Football Association who invited me down to see what it was all about. The team were so welcoming and encouraged me to start.

When I first started there was only really one team in the North West, and that was in Manchester. It was a small team, I travelled every week with my dad to train with them. It was those people who really got me into it and helped me improve.

Before I lost my leg, I didn’t really do that much sport, unless skateboarding counts? And I guess I’m now always looking for that buzz. And football really gives me that.

Every time, no matter how many times you play, you still get that buzz when you walk out onto the pitch and sing the England National Anthem with your team mates.

How wearable technology has helped

When I lost my leg it was quite a big deal. I didn’t really want to do stuff at the time. But my mum was there, giving me a push to get out there and do things.

I work full time, I coach and play football as well. So I’m always very busy. I’m always looking for ways to make my life easier. Using contactless wearables to pay really helps.

Contactless devices like Barclaycard wearables definitely make life easier, especially when I’m on crutches. It means I don’t have to stop to get my wallet out. The pay fob on my keys is especially useful because I always have it with me when I drive.

My wristband is keeping me on the move. It means I literally don’t have to have anything on me.

I’ve overcome many obstacles in my life. The next one is winning the European Championship with England.

Disabled football player sitting at a table in club house
Martin Heald with friends in the club house

It’s hugely encouraging to see leading brands like Barclaycard developing accessible products, and including disabled people as part of their flagship advertising campaigns to promote these products.

Disabled people and their families have a combined spending power of over £200 billion a year. We hope this step by Barclaycard encourages other leading brands to recognise the importance of diversity and put more disabled people at the heart of their campaigns.

Find our more about the value of the purple pound.

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