Thanks to these mums, we’re getting closer to equality

This year for Mother’s Day we wanted to take a moment to say thank you to the mums who are campaigning and raising awareness to make everyday equality for disabled people a reality. ‘Not all heroes wear capes’ and thanks to their work, the world will be a better place, not just for their children but for your children too.

We wish we could thank you them all individually but, for now, here are the stories of just a few of the incredible mums we’ve been working with.

Christie

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Christie and her daughter Elise

Last year, among many other things, Christie starred in a Scope video talking about inaccessible play areas. The video was picked up by someone at the local park committee and a fundraiser was started. As a result, enough money was raised to make Christie’s local park accessible not just for her daughter Elise but all disabled children in the area. Christie also does a lot of awareness raising in the media and started her own Facebook page.

“As a family, you want to be out doing things but nobody ever seems to think about disabled children. I feel like Elise misses out because the world is still not accessible. Sometimes I don’t want to go to places, which means I’ll sit in the house and get angry at the world, then get sad for Elise, and sad for my older daughter Lucy.  But instead of letting it get to me, I’ve decided to change the world instead.

I started a Facebook page called Elise Smashed It. I want everyone to see what an amazing little girl Elise is. I hope it raises awareness and changes perceptions about disability. I want to help other parents too and show them that there is hope. It might not be the life you were expecting, but it’s not the end – it’s just the start of a different life and you’re not alone.”

Marie

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Marie at the park with her son Mark

Marie has worked with us on some of our biggest campaigns including The Disability Price Tag and Work With Me. Marie’s motivation to fight for everyday equality is her son Mark. Her impairment doesn’t affect her ability to be a great mum, but she’s told us about unfair barriers that have an impact on family life.

“As a mum, I’m just like any other parent – disability doesn’t change anything – but I do face unfair barriers that have an impact on family life. I need a new wheelchair but it will cost £9,000 and we’ve been told we have to pay for that ourselves – which we can’t afford. I feel guilty as a parent because when my wheelchair breaks I haven’t been able to do things with my son Mark, like take him to the park.

Mark is always doing things and he most definitely doesn’t see me as anything other than ‘mum’, but he shouldn’t have to miss out. Something needs to change because it’s not fair. We should be able to do things like any other family.

My husband Dan and I have started making an album for Mark, for when he is much older, to show him all the times I have done things for magazines and TV, to raise awareness and create change.”

Sarah

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One of Sarah’s many ‘toilet selfies’ – to raise awareness of inaccessible toilets

Sarah is a campaigning to improve the accessibility of toilets and bathrooms in the UK. Her blog about her son Hadley has significantly raised awareness of the issue, including her toilet selfie advent calendar that went viral in December.

“Hadley was about three years old when he got too big for baby changing units. I realised my only other option was lying him on the floor, which was a bit of a shocker.

Until then I believed accessible toilets contained everything a disabled person needs. It was a huge eye opener for me. I decided there and then that I needed to get involved in campaigning.

In the long term I don’t want Hadley being an adult and having to fight his fight. If we don’t stand up for our kids who else will?”

Carly

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Carly and her daughter ‘following in her footprints’ at the United Nations

It took 32 years for Carly to get her autism diagnosis, after years of being misunderstood and brushed off by professionals. Now Carly works tirelessly to raise awareness of autism and girls and create equality for people with autism . As a single mum to three daughters, two of whom are also autistic, she’s creating a better future for them and setting a wonderful example as a role model. This year Carly was awarded an MBE for her work, which notably includes a speech at the United Nations.

“In 2008, I was told by educational staff that it was impossible that I could have two autistic daughters because autism only happens to boys. Every book I picked up to try to understand and support my daughters all referred to ‘he’ or ‘my son’. There was nothing for girls. I just thought why? I’ve been working to change that ever since.

It’s a really exciting time because I’m looking around and seeing so much more awareness of autism and girls. People finally believe we exist – yippee! That’s my first eight years done. Now my next eight years will be about making sure we have equality; making sure we have the same protection and opportunities as everyone else.

Navigating an untrodden path is scary but it leaves established footprints for our daughters to one day follow.”

Join the conversation on Twitter and tell us about some of the amazing mothers we haven’t mentioned.

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