Everyone focused on the negatives, the things that were ‘wrong’

Sam is mother of nine-year Lucy who has a complex genetic condition. 

In this blog Sam talks about her journey in pregnancy to the birth of Lucy, highlighting the gap in parental support.

Sam during pregnancy
Sam during her pregnancy

I’m married to Craig and we have our daughter, Lucy.  Lucy’s our only child.  She’s now nine years old.  Lucy was born with a very rare, almost unique condition called an unbalanced translocation. One of her chromosomes is missing a little bit off the end and in its place is an extra bit of another chromosome.

Clearly somebody thought there was a problem

I had been trying to conceive after getting married for about three years with no success and went through all of the different tests that you do.

The first round of IVF was unsuccessful.  Then we paid for our second round of IVF. We succeeded. We thought, ‘Great.  That’s fantastic’.  Then at the twenty weeks scan, everything changed.  She was too small, there was not enough fluid in the womb.  I had the scans twice a week for the remainder of my pregnancy.  I also had something called Dopplers every fortnight. Basically, measuring the levels of oxygen and other things, going in to make sure that there’s no placenta lymph insufficiency. We also saw an obstetrician every week, from about 22 weeks. Clearly somebody thought there was a problem.

I had a high-risk pregnancy. When I got to 37 weeks they pushed us into having a C-Section a bit earlier than, perhaps, we should’ve done.  She was born at 5 pounds 1 ounce. I bled a lot. I was quite poorly.

I hadn’t held my baby much or seen her enough

When she came out her left leg was above her head. It was a right odd shape because of her hip dysplasia, which they still didn’t know about because they just said she was breech.  I wanted, skin-to-skin contact but I only spent about five minutes with her. They took her off to a whole different department in the hospital.  She wasn’t even, in the room next door.

A paediatrician stuck her head through the ward curtain and said, ‘I think your baby has got a genetic problem,’ and tried to go away again.  I said, ‘What do you mean, like Down’s?’ that was the only genetic condition I knew.  She said, ‘Yes, I think your baby has got Down’s Syndrome,’ and then left me.  I was on my own for about two hours after that.

In high dependency unity
Lucy in the high dependency unit.

I hadn’t held my baby much or seen her enough.  I couldn’t feel my legs because of the spinal block, but I persuaded the nurses to let me go with my mum and my husband to see my baby.  They had to wheel me to the other bit of the department.  I was so physically poorly I was sick when I got back but I was determined to see her, she was tiny but perfect.  She was in the high dependency unit (HDU).

I would’ve broken sooner had I not been able to see her

I was in hospital for five days.  To be honest I think I would’ve gone stir crazy if I’d stayed any longer in that room.  For my own sanity I came home, but having to leave her, I howled like an animal.  Coming back without your baby having gone in to have one, it’s absolutely horrendous. The worst experience of my life.  My heart and soul were 25 miles away in this hospital where Lucy was in her little cot.  Every day we’d go in to see and cuddle her.

You’re not supposed to travel, really, having had a C-Section, you’re not supposed to be in a car travelling, so I got this special scar cover for protection.  All the things I did physically were wrong in terms of healing after major surgery, but emotionally I would’ve broken sooner had I not been able to go and see her.

I just lost it

The initial diagnosis side of things came on day two.  There was a whole load of stuff going on and it wasn’t handled very well. There was no counsellor there at all. I do think that was a bit odd.

When she was born there was a paediatrician there.  He said she had ‘Dysmorphic features’ which I took to mean he thought she was funny looking.  To be told that when you’re literally high on drugs because you’ve just got the morphine flowing through you, I just lost it.  He should’ve known better, than to say that.

Sam holding baby
Sam holding Lucy

You can’t even see your child. They’re in a completely different room in a different ward.  Somebody you haven’t even met has said these things about your kid and you think maybe they’ve got it wrong. I went into, sort of, pretty much denial.

The system seems to write off your child

I know she understands what we’re saying and we understand what she wants.  I can’t describe it, really, apart from that.  Everybody who knows her loves her.  She’s a very warm personality and funny, a wicked sense of humour.  These are qualities I don’t think I saw at first because everyone focused on the negatives. Certainly nobody told me about these and we had to just find out ourselves.

That’s the point.  The real shame that at the beginning, the system seems to write off your child, particularly with learning disabilities. It’s all focused on what they’re going to be able to achieve. You know, job, marriage, that we have put categories on those as valuing, as important. It’s society that makes it difficult.

Lucy and her mum and dad on a day out
Lucy and her mum and dad on a day out

She’s just won a Triumph Over Adversity award. She got picked out of thirty in her age group in the category.  She’s just incredible.  She has this depth of soul, just having suffered so much. She has a bravery that is truly empowering to be around and a forgiveness, as well.

I really wish somebody had told me that beforehand.  ‘You are going to enjoy this kid.  Yes, it’s going to be hard work, physical hard work,’. I wish there’d been more out there saying, ‘This is an opportunity.  You, your husband, your family, your friends and everybody that comes in to contact with her will grow into better human beings because of this experience.’  I know that sounds really rather profound, but it’s genuinely true.

41 percent of families aren’t offered emotional support during their child’s diagnosis and become increasingly isolated. Become a #DisabilityGamechanger and  donate today and help us provide services for families and provide the vital support they need.

 

Why employers should make gathering disability data a priority

Disabled people can and want to work, but too many face barriers to entering and staying in employment. Whilst there has been an increase in the rate of employment, disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people.

If we want to successfully tackle disability unemployment, then we firstly need to understand the scale of the problem.

We’ve been calling for businesses to improve their understanding of their disabled workforce. That’s why it’s positive that today the Government has announced plans to increase the gathering of disability data in the workplace. In a new framework it has published, the Government is encouraging employers to report on the number of disabled people they employ.

Below we outline what has been announced, and what we want to see happen next.

What does the framework focus on?

The Government has published a voluntary framework for large employers to report on mental health, well-being and disability.

On disability, employers are asked to report on the number of disabled people they employ, along with a narrative to explain what they are doing to recruit and retain disabled employees.

Why is reporting on disability data important?

Disabled applicants are a quarter less likely to be invited to an interview than a non-disabled person. And for every 100 disabled people who move into work, 114 leave.

By collecting and monitoring data on the number of disabled people in the workplace and their overall experience, employers will be in a much stronger position to understand where action is needed to tackle the barriers faced by disabled people, both in and out of work.

Employers already gathering disability data have told us about the value of doing so. Several have said that this information has helped them make the case internally for changes in their recruitment and HR practices.

We know that nearly half of disabled people have worried about sharing information about their disability at work. If reporting is to be a success, then employers will need to ensure their disabled employees feel confident enough to be open about their impairment or condition. This will help create a more inclusive and open environment for disabled people in the workplace, as well as ensuring that data gathered on disability in the workplace is robust.

What do we want to see building on from this framework?

The Government is taking an important first step in understanding better the barriers faced by disabled job-seekers and employees.

In order for reporting to have a real impact in tackling disability employment, there are a number of things that we want to see happen next:

  • The Government must ensure that there is a clear process for analysing any information gathered, and that this shapes future approaches towards increasing disability employment.
  • Any data collected and published by employers is easy to understand and is easy for disabled people to access.
  • As with the gender pay gap, reporting on disability data should eventually be a mandatory requirement for large employers, to encourage wider take-up of reporting on disability in the workplace.

What we will be doing next

We will be publishing a report early in the new year with data on the number of disabled people we employ, as well as data on staff well-being. This will be followed by a more comprehensive report looking at the experiences of disabled people at Scope.

We will also be encouraging employers to publish data in relation to their disabled employees. As part of this, we will be publishing a guide for employers setting out what data they should collect, and how to go about gathering this information.

Check out our website for information for disabled people in work.

Broadcasters commit to doubling the number of disabled staff by 2020. Why aren’t other industries doing the same?

The BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Sky have recently pledged their support to becoming ‘more inclusive’. Lord Hall, director general of the BBC, said: “As an industry we must do more to increase the number of disabled people working in broadcasting.”

In this blog post, we talk about the Inclusive Workplace Network, a membership network of companies who want to become more inclusive of disabled people – and how your company can get involved.

Work can be of fundamental importance to who we are

For many disabled people, work is of fundamental importance to who they are. Work is not just about the money in your pocket at the end of the day. It brings personal benefits and is seen by disabled people as a way to contribute to society, maintain social connections and promote self-worth.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at computer screens at work

While employment is identified by disabled people as being one of the biggest enablers to living the life you choose, getting into and staying in work can be a huge challenge. Disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people, and the difference in employment rates between both groups known as the ‘disability employment gap’, has remained at around 30 percentage points for over a decade.

To add to that, our recent research uncovered that one in two (53%) disabled people have experienced bullying or harassment at work because of their impairment or condition. And 58% of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their impairment.

It’s clear these things need to change

Disabled people tell us that there are many barriers that prevent disabled people from finding work and progressing in employment. These include negative attitudes from employers, colleagues and recruitment agencies, inaccessible workplaces, inflexible working practices and outdated policies.

12343_D-UnfoldApril2018-digital-blog-672x372-v1-simone01

At Scope we know that to drive societal change we need to drive change in the workplace. We have been working with companies on improving attitudes, behaviours and processes. Many companies also recognise the commercial benefits of changing their culture and becoming more inclusive. The ‘purple pound’ is valued at £249 billion per year, with an online spend of £16 billion. Having a more inclusive working culture and employing more disabled people will give companies a better understanding of this large consumer group.

Gem smiles at the camera in her wheelchair in an office

The Inclusive Workplace Network

In response to these factors we launched the Inclusive Workplace Network, a membership network of companies who want to become more inclusive of disabled people. Members receive a thorough review of several aspects of their business, from their policies and HR processes through to their health and safety procedures. Based on this data collection and staff surveys, they’re given thorough advice, support and recommendations on improvements. We will also provide support from a Scope employment adviser, sessions with Scope Workplace Role Models who will share their stories, and invitations to employment events with other network members.

We will be hosting a breakfast meeting on 30 January 2019 at a Central London location for companies interested in joining the Inclusive Workplace Network. You’ll hear about practical ways in which your organisation can become more inclusive of disabled people by improving accessibility and changing perceptions of disabled people at work.

To register your interest in the event, please contact InclusiveWorkplaceNetwork@scope.org.uk

I did a head and beard shave to help other families like us

Peter’s daughter, Elara, has cerebral palsy and has used Scope’s Sleep Service.  Peter wanted to help raise awareness and money for Scope so organised a fundraising event.

In this blog post, he talks about his fundraiser and how you can organise your own.

We saw how hard it is for some parents to cope

My daughter Elara was born 8 weeks early. The doctors and neonatal department soon discovered haemorrhages and believed this happened whilst she was still inside the womb. As time progressed, it was apparent that she had hemiplegia which would affect all her limbs especially her right leg and this was an indicator that she did have cerebral palsy.

A smiling baby in a high chair
Elara smiling and happy

We’re active on social media and on Facebook groups for parents of children with cerebral palsy and we saw how hard it is for some parents to cope. While the challenges facing Elara are comparatively mild others aren’t so lucky and the condition can have a significant impact not just on the children but on their families as well.

Visiting a Scope sleep clinic

My wife visited one of Scope’s sleep clinics. We found it useful and being there confirmed we were doing the right things to get Elara to sleep and we now know what Elara needs. The service was easy to access and was only down the road from us. We gave them a call and luckily there was an available appointment on the day. These services are so vital to helping parents in the same position as us.

I was only meant to do a head shave

A friend of mine did a head shave for charity a few years back and I thought it would be a great event as people always want to see their friend or colleague do something daft.  So, I wanted to help raise awareness and money for Scope.

My target was £250. I was only meant to do a head shave, but I mentioned in passing to one of my colleagues asking how much it would take to get sponsored to shave the beard off.

A man in a Scope tshirt, looking at the camera, holding a phone. He has a bald head and beard.
Peter halfway through his challenge

It then spiralled out of control in a good way, my colleague emailed out that we needed to get to £750 donations to get my beard shaved off. To my surprise this happened.

A man sat on a chair, holding all of his shaved hair and beard in his hands. He is looking glum.
Peter at the end of his challenge

The support from my family and friends was brilliant especially the support from the office.

Just before the shave we were below £600 but, on the day, someone made a large anonymous donation to get to the £750 target.

My Chief Executive Officer came back from sabbatical and increased the donations to reach £1000. I was so overwhelmed by the generosity that everyone showed.

Aside from seeing the generous donations come through for Scope, the most enjoyable part was the shocked faces from people! I was getting lunch just after the shave and people who I worked with walked straight past me.

The support from Scope was great and it was nice to see that the team were keeping in touch to see progress and how things were going. A lot of places will leave you to do it and you won’t hear from them.

It’s such a good feeling knowing you can help

I would absolutely recommend organising an event like this or any type of event for charity. Personally, it’s such a good feeling knowing you can help and the effort you put in gets a tangible result, to invest in the services to help disabled people.

I’m a firm believer of paying it forward to help each other to make this world a better place. It is important to understand that everyone is bound together and can achieve great things.

My target was only £250 however through the generosity of colleagues, family and friends I was able to raise £1085.18 for Scope.

I wouldn’t do anything different, I think I really hit the nail on the head with this event. However, if I was to do it again, I would organise a different type of event. Something like a physical challenge.

We want to support even more families like Peters by funding services like Sleep Right, improving sleep for disabled children. Find out how you can get involved on our website.

Our toolbox of tips that every parent of a disabled child needs daily!

The Ratcliffe Family consists of two dads, Garry and Kyle, and four kids – Haydn, Isobella, Curly and Phoebe – three of whom have a disability. Haydn has cerebral palsy and is blind in one eye, Bella has Downs Syndrome and Curtis has a number of impairments and conditions including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, global developmental delay and he is blind too.

Here Kyle and Gary, write a letter to you to help you in the journey to get a better start in life for your disabled child.

Dear Parent,

We are writing to you as two dads of four awesome kids.  Three of whom have a disability. We wanted to let you know about some of the things we have picked up over the years.  Our toolbox of tips, tricks and attitudes that every parent of a disabled child needs on a daily basis!

Tip one

Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Never let anyone tell you that your child “can’t” do something because of their disability.

It’s currently Half Term, and our kids are already exhausted!  It’s only Wednesday and we’ve already been punting on the river in Canterbury, pumpkin picking in Medway, Chinese buffet eating, Leeds Castle exploring and sightseeing in London.

Two adults behind four children in a London Eye Pod. Two children are in wheelchairs and three are wearing hats.
The Ratcliffe Family on the London Eye

Curtis loves the smell of the flowers, Bella loves the variety of food at the Chinese, Haydn enjoys being surrounded by different people to talk to, and Phoebe (our non-disabled daughter) gets the chance to explore and climb.

Each of our children gets something different out of every experience. Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Tip two

Warrior parent needs to come out every so often

Be prepared to face a side of you that you might never have seen.  Warrior parent needs to come out every so often.  When your child isn’t getting a good deal, don’t be afraid to challenge people.  Whether in a shop, during a visit to an attraction or a medical service you encounter on a regular basis.

There should never be an apology or excuse made for our children.  We always make sure they are treated equally. Good luck to any shop assistant that thinks it’s okay to show us to the disabled changing facilities in a shop, that is clearly being used as a second stock cupboard. Not acceptable.

Tip three

Start to build up a series of questions ready to challenge systems

What to do when you are at your wits end with frustration.  It will happen, regularly. Usually with people that really should know better.

Start to build up a set of questions. Use flashcards if you need to in the early days. Some questions we have found useful are:

  • “What policy does this ridiculous decision come from?”
  • “What is your complaints procedure?”
  •  “Who is your line manager?”
  • “Explain to me how this decision is in the best interests of my child?”
  • “Do you know the contact details for our local MP?”

These are all useful when challenging systems – systems that were often designed for the majority of the population  – but never designed for the people that need them the most!

Tip four

Appreciate the small things. Celebrate the smallest steps

As we are sitting here, writing this letter to you, we would like to say to you, appreciate the small things.  Celebrate the smallest of steps.  Live in the present and be thankful for every little success.

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Curtis smiling

Yesterday, we took about 50 photos of our son, Curtis, who was having a particularly good day. Not because he had just won a football match, not because he swam a length of the swimming pool. Not even because he managed to tie his shoelaces for the first time. But because he smiled. Yes, that’s right. Curtis smiled yesterday. The most infectious, smiley smile that you could ever imagine. A smile that curled up one side of his face. A smile that said “I’m really happy today, dad”. A smile that made us smile too. It’s not the big things that matter when you have a disabled child. It is the smallest step, the greatest achievements that mean the very best.

Last tip

Worry about the things you can control

Having a disabled child will mean that there are dark days as well as light ones.  But hey, that’s parenthood!  If you have a non-disabled child, you might worry about their friendship groups as they get older. We have worries too, as parents of disabled children. All we would say is, don’t let things worry you that you can’t control.  Worry about the things you can control which is why, right now, we are off outside.  To swing on a swing, slide on a slide, to push some warm hot chocolate through a feeding tube, and hope and pray for one more sunny day.

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The Ratcliffe family enjoying the seaside

Your sincerely

Garry and Kyle Ratcliffe

Now is the Time to be a Disability Gamechanger,  sign our petition calling for a new Minister for Disabled Children and Families.

Appoint the first ever Minister for Disabled Children and Families. This appointment would lead to improved accountability for how laws and policies affecting disabled children and their families are made. A dedicated Minister can strengthen how Government and services like the NHS work together to make sure families receive the right support.

Writer Shaun Pye on exploring issues that affect many parents of disabled children, for BBC’s There She Goes

Shaun Pye is the writer of BBC4’s ‘There She Goes’, and is the dad of a 12-year-old girl with a chromosomal disorder.

In this blog, Shaun writes about exploring issues that affect many parents of disabled children, like him – and why now is the time to join our campaign to make life better for disabled children and their families.

Writing a personal story

In the weeks leading up to the broadcast of There She Goes I was extremely nervous. All TV writers worry about the response from friends, critics and the dreaded internet. But I was particularly worried about what the families of children with learning disabilities would think. I had always emphasised that this was a very personal story, about my family’s experiences with my daughter, and didn’t try to tell any wider story about living with disability. But still – I was terrified of how it would go down, all the same!

BBC4's 'There She Goes'

I didn’t need to worry. We had a screening for a wide range of charities, including Scope, which drew a very positive response. Then in the days after episode 1 went out – wow. The number of people who contacted me, or the production company, or the BBC, or took to social media. Overwhelmingly, support was phenomenal (so huge we haven’t had time yet to thank each person individually).

Almost universally it was from parents or siblings of children, although many now adults, with some form of disability. The message repeated over and over was “finally, a programme on television that tries to show what my life has been like”. Many said that other programmes had dealt with the subject matter but often portrayed the parents as saints dealing with a terrible burden, or portrayed learning disability and autism as some sort of superpower to be marvelled at. It’s neither – it’s something that’s amazing, boring, terrifying, funny, sad, uplifting … did I say boring already?

Some people commented on specifics,  the rituals around dealing with finding hidden poo, the bruises up the arm, the ordeal of getting their child or sibling to go for a walk. But many also talked about the broader issues in the programme, a lot of which chime with Scope’s current campaign.

Two hands high five eachother, and text reads: Now is the time to make life for disabled children and their families better. Scope = Equality for disabled people

Now is the Time

A key statistic is that 41 per cent of parents of disabled children say they were offered no emotional support during or after their child’s diagnosis. I’d say our parents and extended families tried to offer support. However, the theme of episode 1 is that a broad range of lovely people just wanted us to think that everything was okay. And it really wasn’t. This meant we had a lack of the support that we really needed.

Another key statistic is that 25 per cent of parents of disabled children feel more isolated at this time. Without question this happened to us. My wife didn’t want people telling her “nothing is wrong” because she knew there was, and if nothing was wrong with her daughter then by extension something must have been wrong with her.

An illustration of a parent and child, with text that reads: One in four parents of disabled children aged 0-5 became more isolated as a result of their child's diagnosis. Scope = Equality for disabled people

When it became apparent to everyone something was wrong, the last thing my wife wanted to do was see cute, bouncing, “normal” children at Tumbletots and NCT get togethers. She didn’t want the judgement of others, well meaning or not. She withdrew from social interaction. I just drank too much. It’s a source of great shame obviously but it is the truth.

One source of regret I have is that I didn’t try and seek out support earlier, from the likes of Scope and the other charities specialising in this field. I think it was from a sense of pride and a feeling that I would be judged? These weren’t rational and I wish I could tell my younger self just to go and get all the help I could.

Raising awareness

If in some small way ‘There She Goes’ can help raise awareness of these issues, promote a bit more understanding of learning disability and help improve the support networks people have access to, and encourage them to access them then, I’m very pleased.

As I said, this programme only ever tried to tell my story. It was a decision taken wholly because that would give the programme authenticity. But beyond that I didn’t think I had the right to try and import other families’ experiences. And anyway, I thought that my daughter was unique.

She is unique. She’s amazing. But a lot of our experiences it turns out are the same. My family have been truly blown away by the response of parents. It’s good to know you’re not alone.

Be a Disability Gamechanger and sign our petition calling for a new Minister for Disabled Children and Families.

Dear Minister for Disabled Children and Families

Carly is an Autism advocate, consultant and professional speaker. She didn’t receive her Autism diagnosis until she was 32, after two of her daughters were diagnosed. She found it a battle to get the voices of Autistic women heard and in 2008 started to notice a lack of understanding and resources when it came to autism and girls.

In this letter Carly shares her thoughts on why she is supporting our Now is the Time campaign, and how a future Minister for Disabled Children and Families can help disabled children and their families get the best start in life.

Dear future Minister for Disabled Children and Families,

My name is Carly. I am an autism advocate, the mother of autistic daughters, and autistic myself.

Like many British disabled parents, we want our children to have a better tomorrow.

We have the passion and the drive. We won’t stop until all UK children have equity, including our disabled children. We don’t want anybody left behind.

Our task is lifelong. Our resilience is remarkable. Our need for support to help our children live a fulfilling life, is at times desperate.

Talent is everywhere, opportunity isn’t

As an advocate I have the privilege (and it is exactly that) to work for phenomenal British pioneers leading the way in disability equality. Most recently, participation with Right Honourable Lord Holmes on his vital independent review on disabled applicants and public appointments. Lord Holmes so wisely said that, “Talent is everywhere, opportunity isn’t.”

This lack of opportunity for our disabled children fails to recognise the gifts and talents disabled youth have, this lack of recognition could come at a great cost to our country in the long term.

Some of the brightest minds that can serve our country not only reside in well performing schools but also in Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) schools.

I have a friend, the acclaimed artist Rachel Gadsden, Rachel has a visual impairment yet in her talks she explains that “you do not need sight to have vision“.

The saying, “The quieter the mouth the louder the mind” means that as assistive technology becomes more sophisticated, the loudest thoughts, minds and perspectives will soon be heard louder than ever before.

Many are left isolated and forgotten

Please visit the family homes where home educated children live.  The children who were “not able enough” to flourish to their full potential in mainstream schools, yet not “disabled enough ” to warrant a SEND educational provision.

There you will find new thinkers, leaders and cyber security experts of tomorrow.  The most creative of artists, inventors and entrepreneurs, are waiting for you to notice them.  They are all missing out on the governments most diverse forward-thinking schemes like Cyber first, aimed to be advertised in schools.

This grey area of education leaves many of our most capable children isolated and forgotten.  They are left without opportunity or support outside their family.  This comes at a cost to our wallet, to our mental health, to our relationships, to our physical health and the NHS. And not to mention the cost to wider society of all that lost opportunity.

Carly writing on a poster at an event all about equality
Carly is an Autism advocate, consultant and professional speaker.

We aren’t asking for pity, we are asking to be heard

We must see disabled children’s abilities and not just their impairments.

We need a minister to work alongside parents, and the existing Minister for Disabled People and Minister for Children to ensure that no grey area is missed. We need you to be concentrating on disabled children alone so that no task is deemed too big, too small, too out of remit to be pursued as a policy priority.

Minister for Disabled Children and Families, we need you to ensure that when any new Disability Act, policy or project is discussed, you are there with a fine-tooth comb.  You need to ensure disabled children are a part of that policy .

At present some policies are too vague to be implemented. Some Acts have been written with adults in mind, and although this is of vital importance, it leaves disabled children behind.

Now is the time

What if parents of disabled children were better understood and work with a Minister as agents of change, respected by professionals and not viewed as “hysterical” or “hard work”? The truth is we aren’t either, we are often just exhausted.

How much talent could be discovered if we supported the most underestimated?

What if we celebrated disability history and the vital contributions disabled people have made to the UK?

What if we had someone like you making it happen? Now is the time to help disabled children and their families get the best start in life.

Yours faithfully

Carly Jones MBE

British Autism Advocate and Mum

Be a Disability Gamechanger and sign our petition calling for a new Minister for Disabled Children and Families.