All posts by kerenscope

Changing the attitudes of the next generation

Meet Mary, one of Scope’s disabled role models. Mary goes into schools to talk to kids about her experience of school, bullying and disability.

Thanks to supporters like you, we plan to reach more school children this year with Scope Role Models, tackling bullying and changing the attitudes of the next generation. 

Bullying hurts

If you were unlucky enough to be bullied as a child, you’ll know how miserable it can make you feel. When everyone is laughing at you, you feel completely alone, and the pain stays with you – sometimes for the rest of your life.

That’s how it was for me. I went to a school with over a thousand students and I stood out – all 4 foot 1 inches of me. There was no place to hide and it was exhausting – emotionally and physically – dealing with so many people who regularly wanted to make fun of you.

Yes, I was the butt of every joke. The bullies thought it was okay to laugh at Mary because they thought, ‘Mary’s not like us. Mary doesn’t have feelings’. But I did.

I went through so much pain, heartache and loneliness. I don’t think I would have had depression as an adult if I hadn’t been bullied as a child.  That’s why I can’t live with the fact that disabled children are twice as likely to be bullied as their non-disabled classmates.

I don’t want another child to experience the constant hurt that I went through

Thanks to supporters like you, we can change the attitudes of the next generation with Scope Role Models. We work with children in schools, because that’s where bullying happens, and that’s where kids form opinions that last for life.

I don’t mind telling you it was daunting the first time I stepped back into a school. The painful memories came flooding back, but the children made it worthwhile. It’s exciting to see their attitudes change in front of you. I’ve found that children are like sponges – they soak up the new ideas I share with them about disabled people, then go out and deliver that message to family and friends.

I just wish we could do more. And we need to do more, because bullying is still going on in schools around the country.

Scope is taking action thanks to your donations

As a Scope Role Model, I want children to understand the pain bullying causes. I want them to understand discrimination has its roots in ignorance. But I also want to share a positive message – and get them thinking about the friendships they miss out on with their disabled classmates.

I just wish there had been something like Scope Role Models when I was in school. It might have spared me a lot of pain, and even changed the course of my life. So I am determined to help get this life changing programme into every school.

Putting a stop to discrimination

Your support is helping disabled children who are dreading going to school because they can’t face another day of being picked on. And together we can change the future, because I’m sure, like me, you want disabled people to have equal opportunities in our society. But that won’t happen if disabled children are bullied in school, and if their non-disabled classmates follow the same path as previous generations. They’ll feel awkward around disabled people, they’ll avoid and exclude us – they’ll discriminate against us.

Thank you so much for your support, without you Scope wouldn’t be able to tackle bullying in such an effective way.

Our goal is to reach 2,500 young people through Scope Role Models this year – so if you can, please send an extra gift today to help change the attitudes of the next generation towards disabled people.

Let’s stop disabled people being labelled “unemployable”

My name is Jodi and I am an Employment Adviser at Scope. It’s my job to support disabled young people into employment.

Right now, disabled people are more than twice as likely to be unemployed than non-disabled people, regardless of the skills, experience and expertise they might have. It’s unjust and unfair. With donations like yours we are working to change that.

A lot of things can stand in the way of a disabled person getting on at work – from difficulty travelling to and from work, to confidence issues or a lack of experience and qualifications – up until now.

Thanks to donations of supporters like you, we can work with young disabled people to find the right job opportunity or apprenticeship, help them with CV writing and interview practice and also support them in their jobs once they’re employed.

It’s rewarding work and I love it. But it can also make me sad and angry.

Misunderstanding and prejudice

All too often, I see misunderstanding, prejudice and even bullying in the workplace and a tendency among employers to think of disabled people only in terms of what they can’t do.

It can be frustrating and demoralising for young people to be overlooked or labelled ‘unemployable’ – to feel like the pathway to greater independence and financial stability is getting narrower and narrower.

For a young person struggling with the whole idea of finding a job, having someone to help them navigate the pathway is really important.

Breaking down barriers

I work with disabled people to understand what unique and valuable skills they have to offer. This may involve a volunteering role to build up confidence and self-esteem. In other instances, something like time keeping skills or the right preparation for an interview can make all the difference.

Employment Advisor talking to a disabled customer
Jodi provides one-to-one support for disabled people looking for work, like Nusrat

For employers, having Scope on hand to provide ongoing support is incredibly useful. By helping them to understand and meet accessibility requirements, we quickly break down barriers.

But for wider change we need to do so much more. That’s why we are also working to influence government policy aimed at closing the disability employment gap, as well as running campaigns to educate the public and address common misconceptions about disabled people and what they can and can’t do.

With your help, we can continue to work with disabled people to ensure they have the same opportunities to find fulfilling work and become more independent – both personally and financially.

Thank you so much for your support, it means a lot to me personally to know you are with us. If you can, please make an extra donation today so we can do even more to support disabled people into work.

Say hello to our £4000 jackpot winner, Liz!

Liz was the lucky winner of £4000, in our Christmas 2016 Jackpot Draw. Liz has been giving to Scope since the late 1990s, and started buying raffles in 2003. She tells us how she felt when she found out, and why she supports us by joining in with our raffles.

How did you feel when you found out you had won top prize?

I never thought I would win! My first reaction was that I wanted to give some of the money back to charity. I found out just after Christmas, and it was nice to have all my family there to tell them. Everyone was so surprised and excited!

What are you going to spend your winnings on?

I’m going to give some of the money back to Scope, and some to another charity, where a family friend works. We’re then going to split the rest of the money between my family. My daughter has recently become engaged, so the timing of this win was perfect.

What does Scope mean to you?

Scope seems to be a very worthwhile charity- I’ve been supporting Scope for a number of years. I used to be a teacher and I taught several disabled students, I once went on a trip with one girl who had cerebral palsy and she joined in with everything. I think it’s important for people to not be treated as different, and I think this is something Scope is really passionate about. I always liked to buy raffle tickets to support Scope, but I really never thought I’d win!

Would you like to win the top prize like Liz did? You’ve got to be in it to win it! Join our Spring Jackpot today for a chance to win £4000, whilst supporting our vital work with disabled people and their families.

No one expects to find out they have cerebral palsy at 60

Meet Paula, who contacted our helpline after learning she had cerebral palsy – at the age of 60. Until then, she had never received any kind of support.

In January 2015, soon after my mother died, my sister called me and told me I should see my doctor as there was ‘something I should know.’ I went to my GP and asked him to read me the medical notes from my birth. He told me that I had mild cerebral palsy.

I’m 60 years old, and I had known nothing about it until then.

My mother and I had not been in touch for 23 years, for many reasons. I will never know why she didn’t tell me.

There was more of a stigma around disability at that time, so maybe that was a part of it. Or perhaps she thought that because I didn’t need a wheelchair or anything, it wasn’t worth doing anything about. Sadly, attitudes still need to change.

Blaming myself

Not knowing about my cerebral palsy has made my life a lot more difficult than it really should have been.

My movements are awkward and slow, meaning I need extra time to do things. My speech also causes me difficulties. When I’m tired, it’s really hard for people to understand me – almost impossible if I’m exhausted.

Paula and her baby son
Paula and her son

But all my life I blamed myself for my differences, and thought I was just clumsy and slow. I drove myself into the ground trying to keep up at work, and that took its toll on me emotionally. When shown a job, it takes me longer to learn, and it often resulted in people getting annoyed with me.

I was never offered any extra support when I found things difficult. In one job, my colleagues would go home after they had finished their work, leaving me to finish my part alone. A supervisor once said she ‘felt like shaking me’.

I always tried to remain positive and upbeat, but it had a huge impact on my self-esteem and confidence. If I had known more, I think I would have stood up more for myself. And I could have asked for support with things such as my speech, which would have made a big difference for me.

Scope’s support

I rang Scope within a fortnight of finding out, and they sent Olli, a regional response worker, out to visit me. I thought she would have no time for me, but she came out the very same week. She said she had never met anyone who didn’t know about their condition until my time of life.

Olli has been fantastic, and having her information, advice and support has been excellent. With her guidance, I have sought out speech therapy, which has greatly improved my speech. I have also had physiotherapy and seen a continence nurse, and I have had rails installed in my bathroom.

Paula and her husband
Paula and her husband, who have just celebrated their Ruby wedding anniversary.

Life today

And just having this knowledge about myself has changed my life for the better. I feel much less agitated. I always felt I needed some kind of help, but I never knew what I needed or who to ask. I’m finally making up for lost time. I’ve now got the confidence to try new things; I go to Tai Chi, I swim and I am a bell ringer.

 I feel the things I have had to deal with in life have made me focused, determined and positive. I’m more aware of other people’s problems, and how they are feeling.

Excitingly, I’ve recently become a grandma. This got me thinking about my own experiences and how much things have changed. What happened to me – my disability being brushed under the carpet – I wouldn’t want to happen to any child today.

Our helpline is only possible thanks to donations from supporters.

You can help us be there for disabled people and their families by donating to Scope today. Your gift can support services such as our helpline, offering vital information and guidance to those who need it – whether 6 or 60.