All posts by melwilkes

What do recent announcements on PIP and ESA mean for disabled people?

Our welfare system plays an essential role in supporting disabled people to be more financially secure.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) for instance helps disabled people to cover some of the additional costs faced as a result of an impairment or condition. For disabled people who are out of work, Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) is important in helping to meet day-to-day costs.

Over the past few months there has been a lot of attention on PIP and ESA. Here we look at what’s been happening and what these changes mean for disabled people.

High Court ruling on PIP

Back in April 2017 the Government made changes to PIP that tightened up access to the payment for many disabled people. We campaigned against these changes, which made a crude distinction between people with physical impairments and mental health problems.

Then, in December 2017, the High Court ruled that some of these changes were discriminatory and should be scrapped.

The Government last month said that it won’t be appealing this decision and that it will be reviewing all decisions relating to PIP awards since the payment  was introduced.  They estimate that up to 220,000 disabled people will receive backdated payments where necessary.

This is a welcome decision, as we know PIP is a lifeline for disabled people. In research we carried out with over 500 recipients of either PIP or DLA, 58 per cent said that even a small reduction in their PIP award would have a significant impact on their ability to live independently.

What does this mean for disabled people?

  • The Government will review all PIP assessment reports to identify individuals who could be eligible for a backdated payment.
  • This includes people who were not eligible for PIP following an assessment.
  • No one will need to go through a repeat assessment.
  • The Government has not yet announced when the review will start, or in what order claims will be reviewed.

PIP and ESA assessments

This week, the Work and Pensions Select Committee published a report following an inquiry in to how PIP and ESA assessments are working for disabled people.

This made recommendations to Government to improve the way that applications and assessments for PIP and ESA are carried out, such as using more accessible forms of communication and offering home assessments.

The Committee also put forward ideas to make sure decisions about disability benefits are fair and transparent. These include recording assessments, letting claimants know which pieces of evidence have been used to make a decision, and allowing individuals to review their report during the assessment.

We welcome this report and want to see Government act quickly to put these measures in place. However, it is clear that both the PIP assessment and Work Capability Assessment (WCA) for ESA are not fit for purpose and need urgent reform.

We want to see the PIP assessment replaced with an assessment that properly identifies the range and level of extra costs disabled people face.

We also want to see the Work Capability Assessment replaced with a new approach which recognises the full range of barriers that prevent disabled people entering and staying in work.

Reforming both of these assessments is crucial in ensuring disabled people are getting the right support – whether with disability-related costs or whilst out of work – and are able to live independently and participate fully in society.

What will we be doing next?

It’s vital our welfare system works for disabled people. Following the Government announcement on PIP and the Work and Pensions Select Committee report, we will be continuing to campaign for reform of both the PIP assessment and the WCA

If you have any concerns about your payments, you could contact Scope’s helpline for free for more information

Any new assessments need to be shaped by disabled people’s experiences. We want to hear about your experiences of applying for PIP and ESA. If you’d like to share your story, please comment below or email stories@scope.org.uk.

Let’s talk: New research into disabled people’s experiences of talking about disability at work

Today Scope has published new research which looks at disabled people’s experiences of talking about disability at work.

We carried out a series of interviews with disabled people who are working. Some of those who took part had talked to their employer and colleagues about their impairment or condition, some hadn’t spoken about disability at work at all and others had shared some information with some people at work.

Below is a summary of our findings and our recommendations to employers and government to improve conversations about disability at work

Why is this important?

For some disabled people, talking about disability at work means they can start conversations about their support needs and how these may change over time. This can often be challenging for disabled people – two fifths of respondents in our research who asked for adjustments at work have felt uncomfortable doing this.

A graphic which shows a stat from Scope research. It reads "Two fifths of respondents who asked for adjustments at work have felt uncomfortable doing this"
Two fifths of respondents who asked for adjustments at work have felt uncomfortable doing this

In other cases, conversations between disabled colleagues can help create an environment where more people feel comfortable sharing information about their own impairment or condition at work.

Sharing information also allows employers to gather information about the experiences of disabled staff and helps them to develop a picture of how effectively they are recruiting, retaining and developing a diverse workforce.

By establishing an environment where disabled staff feel able to start conversations about disability, employers will be better placed to support their staff to reach their potential.

It’s important to recognise that some disabled people will have more choice over if, when and with whom they share information than others. However, this research has found that even among people who have a visible impairment, conversations about this and any support needs they have can have a significant impact on experiences at work.

Barriers to talking about disability

As many as 48 per cent of disabled people worry about sharing information about their impairment or condition with their employer. Some people who took part in the research had worried that telling their employer they are disabled may put their job opportunities at risk.

A graphic showing statistics from Scope research. It reads "48 percent of disabled people have worried about sharing information about their impairment or condition with an employer"
48 percent of disabled people have worried about sharing information about their impairment or condition with an employer

Others were concerned about how their manager or colleagues would react, and wanted to avoid negative comments, personal questions or pity.

Read more about Gladys’ experiences of talking about disability at work.

What leads to sharing information?

Many disabled people who took part in the project preferred to have conversations about disability on their own terms than responding to questions.

This included choosing who to tell, what information they shared  and when they shared it.

Positive and negative experiences of sharing information

Some disabled people had negative experiences when they talked about their impairment or condition at work.

These included feeling they hadn’t been listened to, or feeling as though they were being singled out as a result of the information they had shared.

For others, talking about disability had been more positive, and had led to them getting support to carry out their role.

For many disabled people who took part in the project, a positive aspect of talking about disability was that it opened up new conversations with disabled colleagues.

What needs to change?

We want to see employers review the way they gather information about their disabled staff. It is vital they take steps to make sure line managers know how to respond and offer support when staff start conversations about disability.

We’re also calling on the Government to improve the support available to working disabled people as well as employers. We want to see the role of the Equality and Human Rights Commission strengthened so that employers who discriminate can be held to account.

It is important that disabled people are able to make informed decisions about if, when and how they talk disability at work. Based on the experiences of the people we spoke to, we’ve outlined ideas in our report for disabled people to consider when sharing information about their impairment or condition. 

Read more about our findings and recommendations and show your support on social media using #EverydayEquality

What’s behind the disability employment gap?

This morning, the Government has published the latest data on disabled people in and out of work. So what does it tell us?

We know disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people.

We have been calling on the Government to deliver on its commitment to halve the disability employment gap, and to deliver a strategy that tackles the barriers disabled people face in and out of work.

New statistics out today

Data from the labour force survey published this morning shows that around 80 per cent of non-disabled people are in work, compared with 48 per cent of disabled people.

The difference between the two rates is often called the disability employment gap. Today’s results show the gap is 32 percentage points.

You can read our reaction to the labour stats on our website.

Barriers to work

Although the overall employment rate is higher than ever, the disability employment gap has barely shifted over the last ten years.

We know work isn’t right for everyone, and believe everyone’s contribution to society should be valued whether they work or not. Many disabled people tell us they do want to work, but face barriers in society, both moving in to work and in keeping their jobs.

These include things like buildings and transport not being accessible and working hours not being flexible.

Employers

Text reads: 85 per cent of disabled people feel employer attitudes have not improved since 2012

Behind many of these barriers is attitudes employers hold towards disabled people. We know 85 per cent of disabled people feel employer attitudes haven’t improved since 2012.

While employers are legally required to try to make adjustments to support disabled employees, very few employers understand how this requirement  affects them

Falling out of work

Digging a little deeper in to the labour force survey, we’ve also found that disabled people are nearly three times more likely to leave work than non-disabled people.

We’ve also found that people who acquire an impairment as adults are 4 times more likely to fall out of work than non-disabled people This shows how important it is that employers offer support and make adjustments for their employees.

The Government recently published Improving Lives , a consultation on plans to change support for disabled people in and out of work. At Scope, we want to see the Government listen to disabled people’s views and to drive a shift change in employer attitudes and workplace practices in the UK.

Tell us about your experiences

Have you become disabled since you started working?  We’d love to hear about your experiences. Contact: stories@scope.org.uk for more information.