Category Archives: Everyday equality

What does the general election result mean for our work?

Last week voters went to the polls to have their say in the General Election and on Tuesday MPs returned to a Parliament that looks different to the one they left a little more than eight weeks ago.

Following the election, the Conservatives, whilst remaining the largest party, lost their majority in Parliament. They are now looking to come to an agreement with the DUP, whereby the DUP will support them on key votes such as the Budget

Whatever happens, it is crucial that the Government and Parliament do not lose sight of addressing the barriers that prevent disabled people from taking fully part in society.

We know that in 2017, life is still much harder for many disabled people than it needs to be. This is something we believe the Government should urgently address.

We want the Government to listen to disabled people

The Prime Minister has spoken about creating a country where no one is left behind and where the challenges people face in their everyday lives are addressed. And in their manifesto the Conservatives said that they will confront the burning injustice of disability discrimination.

We want the new Government to listen to disabled people and make sure everyday equality for disabled people becomes a reality. Everyday equality is about ensuring that disabled people have the same opportunities in life as everybody else.

What we’re asking the Government

Before the election, we set out our calls to the next Government. As Parliament returns and ahead of the Queens Speech next week we are calling on the Government to:

Improve disabled people’s work opportunities by removing the barriers to work disabled people face. The Conservative manifesto made a commitment to get one million more disabled people in work over the next ten years and to improve disabled people’s employment support. We have been campaigning over the last few years for the disability employment gap to be halved and for support for disabled people both in and out of work to be improved. We want to see a complete overhaul of the Work Capability Assessment as it does not currently identify all the barriers disabled people face to work.

Enable disabled people to live independently by increasing investment in social care and reforming the social care system so it better supports working age disabled people. Social care was a big issue at the election and all parties have talked about the need for change. However, we are concerned that working age disabled people have not been part of the public debate on this issue. Working age disabled people represent a third of social care users and we are clear that they must be listened to and that support must work for them.

Improve disabled people’s financial security. We know that life costs more if you are disabled. Disabled people on average spend £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. The Conservative manifesto says the Government wants to “reduce the extra costs that disability can incur”.

We believe the Government should protect the value of disability benefits and develop a new Personal Independence Payment assessment which accurately identifies extra costs. It is also crucial that action is taken to ensure that the experiences of disabled consumers is improved. Disabled people’s households spend £249 billion a year, but all too often they receive a poor service from businesses.

Over the coming months as the Government sets out its plans, we will be working with MPs of all parties to ensure that these issues remain a priority and continue to campaign for everyday equality for disabled people.

I still don’t have the support I need to live a full life

Josie, from Bristol, was a nurse until 2008, when she developed a number of impairments which affect her health and mobility.

She has most recently been diagnosed with mast cell activation, a condition which affects immunity and increases the chances of anaphylaxis attacks.

In 2008, I was well and working as a nurse. Then I got ill, and just didn’t get better. I was eventually diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a neurological condition which causes pain all over the body.

I then suddenly developed idiopathic anaphylaxis – life-threatening allergic reactions caused by a range of things, from heat to pollen and perfume. It means I need to have a support worker with me when I go somewhere new in case I have a reaction.

My other health problems mean my mobility is limited, and I’m often ill in bed for several days at a time.

I recently got an electric wheelchair, which has been amazing and has given me some of my freedom back. I have two children who live with their dad, whom I see regularly. But I still do not have the support I need to live a full life.

Some days I barely get to speak to anyone

At the moment, I get three short visits a day from a care worker to cook my meals, help me shower, and keep the house clean. I get two hours every two weeks “social” time which at best on a good day gets me over the park and back .

It’s not long enough to join in any activities but I value this time hugely as it’s uninterrupted time with actual real conversation, not just “what do you need to eat?” or similar.

My basic needs are met – I’m clean and I’m fed. But I haven’t got enough support to actually get me out of the house. It means that some days I barely get to speak to anyone, let alone have a social life.

If I get an infection and have to ask my carer to pick up a prescription, I don’t get to have a shower that day. There just isn’t enough time.

Josie, a disabled woman, and her daughter

What the right support would enable me to do

A little more support – for example, a support worker to go with me to new places – would give me so much more opportunity to take part in life, but at the moment that feels like an impossible utopia!

People like me, who were professionals and could make a contribution with the right support, are being cut out of the workforce.

Working in an office or a hospital isn’t really possible for me, but I still have skills and experience that I would like to use, if I had the means of doing so.

Everyday equality by 2022

In the end, it is a question of equality. In a fair world, I would have the support I need to live my life, and the opportunity to fulfil my capabilities.

I’d be able to go out and have a social life. I’d have support to do some work, maybe based at home where I would be able to control my surroundings. Instead I don’t feel like I’m living, just existing.

Tell us what living independently means to you  

Scope is calling on the next government to improve social care for disabled people, so they can live the life they choose.

You can read more about Scope’s priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does living independently mean to you? What would getting the right support from social care enable you to do? Email the stories team and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.

How the next Government can make Everyday equality a reality

In just six weeks’ time voters will go to the polls to have their say in the General Election. 

Today we are setting out our calls for the next government – commitments and changes we are asking for so that by 2022 disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else: Everyday equality.

We know that in 2017, life is still much harder for many disabled people than it needs to be. Too often disabled people can’t access the support they need to at home, in education or work and face negative attitudes, extra costs and pressures on family life.

Action is needed in a range of areas which is why we would like the next government to take a cross-government approach to disability which tackles the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

Today we are calling for action in three main areas:

Improving disabled people’s work opportunities

Text on infographic reads: Disabled people are almost twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people

Many disabled people want to work but continue to face huge barriers without the support they need to find, stay and progress in work. The disability employment gap – the difference between the employment rates for disabled and non disabled people – has stood at over 30 percentage points for over a decade and less than half of disabled people are in work.

We are calling on the next government to commit to halving the disability employment gap and report publicly on the progress it is making towards this target. We also want to see reforms to the support disabled people receive in and out of work, including the Work Capability Assessment, changes to sick pay and ending benefit sanctions.  It is vital that the government also provide better careers advice, work experience and opportunities for apprenticeships for young disabled people.

Ensuring disabled people have support to live independently

Social care plays an important role in supporting many disabled people to live independently, work, build relationships and be part of their local communities. However, we know that over half of disabled social care users aren’t getting the support they need to live independently.  We believe the next government should invest in social care so that disabled people of all ages get the support they need.

It’s also vital that the government tackles the barriers disabled people face getting online as just 25 per cent of disabled adults have never used the internet compared to 8 per cent of non-disabled adults. The next government should commit to improving digital skills and increasing digital accessibility.

Improving disabled people’s financial security

Infographic reads: Life costs more if you're disabled. On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on disability related costs

Disabled people spend on average £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. Extra costs may include specialist equipment or higher heating bills.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is vital in helping disabled people meet some of these costs. Many disabled people face difficulties when applying for PIP and the assessment decision is often overturned at a later date.

We would like to see the next government protect the value of PIP and develop a new assessment that more accurately identifies the extra costs disabled people face.

Disabled people often have negative experiences as consumers and receive a poor service from businesses. That’s despite disabled people’s households spending £249 billion a year. Therefore, we are calling on businesses and regulators to improve the experiences of disabled customers and give greater consideration to how they can support them.

There are 13 million disabled people in Britain – a hugely significant number of votes – and 89 per cent of voting age disabled people have said they will vote at the next election. We are calling on all candidates to listen to and engage with disabled people and for whoever is next in government to deliver that strategy which will achieve everyday equality for disabled people.

Throughout the election look out for opportunities to engage with your local candidates at events, hustings and talk to them about what everyday equality means for you.

Infographic with text: There are 13million disabled people in the UK - 21 per cent of the UK population

Find out more about how you can register to vote in this election in our latest blog and share on social media what everyday equality means for you by using the hashtag #Everydayequality. 

“Having a job is life-changing”

Felix is a post room assistant at Boodle Hatfield LLP. In this blog, he talks about finding employment, employers attitudes and why disabled people should have the same opportunities as anyone else.

My early experiences of looking for work were quite challenging. For most people on the autistic spectrum there’s the challenge of communication. I’m no exception. I struggled with communication myself. For a while my confidence was low because of an experience I’d had in a previous job where my role was abruptly ended.

I was unemployed for 18 months and I had the feeling that I wasn’t going to get a job. But, with the right support  and doing various work experience opportunities, I was able to get my confidence back and be where I am today.

When it comes to employment, whatever other barriers exist, I think confidence is one thing that’s overlooked. Confidence will improve your chances of getting into work. Employers want confident people, whether they’re disabled or not.

Tailored support is important

Tailored support is important because not everyone’s needs are going to be the same and they need a different approach to meet those needs. Scope helped me with the basics – cover letters, CV writing, how to conduct yourself at an interview – as well helping me get my confidence back. They also set up a work placement which was one of the highlights.

I feel that Scope’s employment programme was that major catalyst for leading me into employment. Meeting the right people who can help with your career goal is important. I would definitely encourage young people to get involved in Scope’s employment services. Before that, I didn’t think I was going to be able to work for all the companies that I have done – law firms, Costa, HSBC, a legal support company.

Felix laughing with a friend

Having a job is life changing

My job is quite action packed. I enjoy being on my feet and keeping myself busy. Another thing I enjoy is having a laugh and socialising with the people that I work with.

Having a job is life changing. When you have a job there are certain things that you can do. You can contribute, you don’t have to rely on your parents. You can also do things for yourself that you couldn’t do before – things like getting new clothes, music, football. It gives you independence. Having a job is important for my financial security and independence. It gives me a sense of freedom – being able to do things that I couldn’t do before when I was unemployed. It also comes with responsibility – budgeting and making sure that your money is spent wisely.

My life right now, I’d rate it 9 out of 10. Even though I don’t have a place of my own yet, I think my life is pretty good. I’d like to be able to move out into my own place. It’s been on the cards for some time but I feel that I’m closer to doing that now.

What I want to see in future

In 5 years’ time want to see more disabled people in employment, more disabled people being present in society and more visibility in terms of trying to create that level playing field between disabled people and non-disabled people.

I want to see Scope keep up their campaigns and influencing work but the one-to-one support is also really important. I think the Government should encourage more tailored support programmes to meet the different needs of disabled people.

There are 13.3 million disabled people living in Britain today. Amongst that are disabled people who are looking for work. I honestly believe, from my experiences, that being disabled doesn’t have to be a barrier to you finding work. It will take the right support and you working to overcome the barriers that do exist to get what you want – just like any other goal in life.

At Scope, we work to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. There are 13 million disabled people in the UK today and life is still too hard for too many.

Our new strategy has been developed with disabled people and their families and sets out how we want to make this country a better place and drive positive, lasting change.

Disabled people still face extra costs of more than £500 a month, struggle to get into and stay in work and are not easily able to access financial support. Scope will campaign to make sure that more disabled people have the right to work in the job they choose and receive the support they need to manage the extra costs of disability.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy.

“We have a feeling that our family’s future is bright”

Aslam and Sadia live in London with their four daughters. They struggled to get the support they needed for their daughter Kinza after she was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. She went through many health problems and it was a very stressful time for the family. Aslam and Sadia turned to Scope for support and it turned things around, making them feel less isolated and stronger as a family. In this film and blog, they talk about why support is essential for disabled children to get the best start in life.

As my daughter, Kinza, was growing, we saw that she was not developing like other children. When she was six months old, we took her to a specialist. They told us that some children have a tendency to develop later and to wait until she was 9 months old. We waited but she was still the same so the specialist referred her for some tests and we found out that she had cerebral palsy.

Dealing with the diagnosis

The diagnosis made us feel very depressed. Kinza was our first daughter and we had plans in our mind about what it would be like. We took her to many places and specialists to get their advice. What were the options? Is there anything we can do for her? So many questions. Nobody could make any guarantees. We just had to wait and see. My wife was worried and she still asks me sometimes “What is going to happen?”

As she was getting older, we were finding it difficult to handle. We asked for advice about what you can do for this type of condition. They all spoke about physical things, but no-one talked about her mental development.

As life went on, Kinza started having a lot of health problems. It was a very difficult time for us. We didn’t know what was going to happen next. So many things were going through our mind and we were really upset.

We got in touch with Scope because I was struggling

We were given a number for Scope and a few other organisations. We called everyone. We couldn’t find help from those organisations but we found help from Scope. It was a great experience. We discussed our problems and got some advice and we started to feel better. Before that, we were alone and nobody was helping.

Without Scope’s support, we don’t know what we would have done. We’d be struggling more and maybe getting worse. The emotional support that they have given us has been fantastic. We’re feeling much better compared to previous days and we have a lot more strength now.

Without Scope, we wouldn’t have achieved everything so far for Kinza, which is a lot. She’s in less pain now, she’s concentrating, she makes noises to communicate. She feels happy, she laughs.

A man and woman smile with their disabled daughter who is a wheelchair user

The future is looking bright

Hopefully, we will reach that point where Kinza will be totally independent. At this point, Kinza will be happy and we will be happy. After coming out of these difficult times, we have a feeling that our future, especially for our kids is bright, they will get good education and succeed in life.

The most important thing is that you never lose hope. If you have hope, then you can achieve everything. Don’t be isolated and try and find the support you need.

At Scope, we work to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. There are 13 million disabled people in the UK today and life is still too hard for too many.

Our new strategy has been developed with disabled people and their families and sets out how we want to make this country a better place and drive positive, lasting change.

We’ll support parents of disabled children get the support they need, so that all children can succeed at school and get the education they want. We’ll work to make sure that disabled young people are supported as they move in to adult life, whatever they want to do.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy.

“Everyone deserves to live a life of dignity”

Ricky is currently studying for a Masters degree in the Theory and Practice of Human Rights. In this blog he describes his experience of living independently while at university.

I worried about the support I’d get at university

As I did my A levels, I was encouraged to go to university and I knew I wanted to carry on studying. I’ve always had a passion for politics and I wanted to take it further. My concerns were that I had never been in a mainstream environment. I had always been to specialised schools and colleges before that point.

I didn’t know what to expect and how other non-disabled people learnt as, obviously, being blind means that you can’t learn in the usual visual way of learning. I was also worried about the support I’d be able to get in relation to my care and social support. It was always there in school and college, I just didn’t know what was going to be there for me.

I could be left in my room for 24 hours at a time

Originally, I had agency support for my care. I stayed with them for about a year and a half, then I went onto direct payments. I applied and got the maximum disabled students allowance DSA so I’ve always had academic support, people to take notes, scan my books and reading materials etc.

I really enjoyed the academic side of things and the academic department did everything they could for me. I don’t think they ever had a blind student before. Socially, academic support at Sussex was a total disaster in terms of being left in my room for 24 hours at a time. It really took its toll on me. I felt really lonely and I didn’t really get the student experience at undergraduate level.

My current support is so much better

I’m now at the University of Essex and I’m studying for an MA in the Theory and Practice of Human Rights. I have to say, the support is a lot better at my new university. There are some hiccups but overall, it’s going pretty well. The student support department actually really care about the students and they’re really on the ball, properly qualified and their expertise levels are a lot higher. They know what they’re doing.

I’ve been so well accommodated and I’m really grateful to my local authority for giving me those opportunities to live life as any other university student should. I have choice.

More hours means more independence

I’ve just had my support doubled to 41.5 hours a week. It has made such a tremendous difference to me. Previously, I only had just about enough support just to live, to survive. I could only have a daily meal cooked and have a sandwich made up for the following day. It also meant that I could only get washing and shopping done, there wasn’t any time for social activities.

The increase in hours has meant I can do so much more. I now don’t have to rely on carers to do things for me out of their good will as a friend. I now have people coming in twice or sometimes even three times a day. I have a great team and they support me to do so many things.

Two men share a coffee in a cafe

Good social care is so important

Bad social care looks very bleak; staff not turning up, miscommunications, random staff turning up. There was one occasion where my mum had to drive down to Brighton because the agency had no one available and I would have been without food.

The alternative to agencies is direct payments. The only problem is that you have to advertise yourself for carers but once you establish a good network of people who can help you recruit it’s a really is a liberating experience to be able to employ people who have similar interests to you. When you’ve got a good team, it can work really well.

Having the right support is really good for my emotional wellbeing. As well as being able to survive, it allows me to socialise, take opportunities and explore avenues that are available to other people at university. It is so important to have good solid, reliable and enjoyable social care. Everyone deserves to live a life of dignity, autonomy and to be themselves no matter what.

At Scope, we work to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. There are 13 million disabled people in the UK today and life is still too hard for too many.

Our new strategy has been developed with disabled people and their families and sets out how we want to make this country a better place and drive positive, lasting change.

We want all disabled people to be able to live the life they choose. That’s why we are focusing on making living independently a reality. From campaigning for better social care to providing information, advice and support, we’ll fight to make independence and choice a reality for many more disabled people.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy.

Today we launch our new five-year strategy – Everyday equality

Today marks the start of an important journey for Scope as we launch our new five-year strategy – Everyday equality.

We’re setting out a bold vision for how we can reach more people than ever and continue our mission of driving social change to ensure disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else.

That’s because we know that life today is much harder for the 13 million disabled people in this country than it needs to be. Disabled people have told us the challenges they face are changing. So we’re changing to meet those challenges with them.

Our mission

Our mission is to achieve everyday equality with disabled people in Britain.

Everyday equality is about ensuring we all have the same opportunities in life. For us, it’s about ensuring that disabled people aren’t made to feel inferior, aren’t treated unfairly, aren’t overlooked because of their impairment or condition.

It’s about fairness, justice and rights – at home, at school, at work and in our communities.

Disabled people tell us that everyday equality can’t be achieved without a steady income, enough money to pay the bills and cope with life’s unexpected events. For many disabled people – although not all – everyday equality is about having a job.

For others it’s about feeling strong enough to cope with the hard times. It’s about knowing how to get support at times and in ways that are most convenient. It’s about finding people who are in the same boat, not feeling alone or isolated. It’s about being visible, being included and having a voice, going to school, feeling safe, making friends and enjoying life.

Our focus

We will focus our work in the areas disabled people have told us matter most, supporting them to:

  • Get the best start in life
  • Live the life they choose
  • Be financially secure

We will drive social change by influencing policy, attitudes and championing the rights of disabled consumers. We will continue to offer support, information and advice to disabled people and their families. And of course, disabled people will remain at the heart of everything we do. 

We want to campaign with everyone to change policies, laws and attitudes. We want to build a community of disabled people who support each other through life’s big moments and harness the power of digital technology to improve lives.

We’ll also continue to deliver direct services to disabled people and their families. The types of services we deliver will change but everything we do will advance our mission of securing equality for disabled people. We can only deliver this by reaching many more people. That’s why we have an ambition to directly reach more than two million people with our services by 2022.

This will only be possible with your support

Of course, all of this will only be possible with your continuing support. We know there’s a lot still to be done. We won’t stop until Britain is a country where disabled people can reach their potential and live the life they choose.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy and how you can get involved