Category Archives: Everyday equality

At the Commonwealth Games people said, ‘I didn’t realise you could throw that far’.

As another successful Commonwealth Games draws to a close in Australia we spoke to 2014 discus gold medalist Dan Greaves and  Laura Turner about the past, present and future of inclusive sport. 

Dan Greaves

I was very fortunate to be involved in the Commonwealth Games in 2014, it was an incredible experience. People came up to me afterwards and said, ‘I didn’t realise you could throw that far’. It was really great to demonstrate how powerful Parasport is and make an impact.

I came from a sporty background so I was pushed into sport and loved it. I was a swimmer first. Watching Adrian Moorhouse, Sharon Davis, those kinds of people, on TV doing so well at the Olympics. Atlanta in 1996, Linford Christie and Sally Gunnel. I was in school then, practising waving to the crowd at opening ceremonies. Four years later, I went to Sydney for my first Paralympics.

The impact of London 2012

You can still see the domino effect of London 2012. There are more people trying to get active and schemes popping up left, right and centre. It just shows you that there’s an interest in sport. If you really, really want to do it then it doesn’t take as long as you think.

Sprinter Laura Sugar, who has the same condition as me, told me that she was inspired after seeing an advert for London 2012 where I was talking about my disability. It took me back a bit, we get so wrapped up in our little world. So for her to then reach the Paralympic games, I was gobsmacked.

So, had we not had London 2012 we might not have had people like Laura now involved in sport. The more we can do to help promote it, get a bit of nostalgia going and keep it in people’s minds. It’s always going to be strong because we’re such a sport mad country.

Athletes of the future

Npower launch partnership with Team England
Dan and Denise Lewis with school kids

I’m now working with Npower and Team England to go into schools and encourage more kids to take up sport. It’s amazing to see how enthused they are. When I was growing up I didn’t have that opportunity and I would have really relished someone to come and show me their medals or talk about their experiences.

Just to give the opportunity to younger kids to say that they can do it and go on the same journey that other athletes have done. I hope I inspired some future champions –disabled or not. Sport is for everyone.

We’ve come leaps and bounds, a lot more people now understand Paralympic sport and they really enjoy it. When I was doing Paralympic sport in 2000 there wasn’t much media coverage, I think three members of the press came to greet us at the airport. Years later, at London 2012 Channel 4 had to put on an extra show because people wanted to watch it so much.

I think there are more opportunities now being given to disabled people across the UK to actually take up sport and they now know how to access those sports. When I was starting out I didn’t know who to contact or what organisation to go to. It just shows you now there’s been a complete overhaul and a lot more access for disabled people.

Laura Turner

Allowing Para-events to take place alongside main competition is fantastic. It gives spectators and supporters the opportunity to see just how much of an impact sport has on disabled people, both physically and mentally.

Laura Turner
Laura (left) competing with her co-pilot

Following its debut in Rio, it was great to see the Para Triathlon at this year’s Commonwealth Games, to see swimmers still get medals after being reclassified and new world records being set in Para Cycling.

Everyone should have the opportunity to take part in sport or do physical activity. I was 12 years old when I was introduced to sport, looking back this was too late in life. The Gold Coast set out to ‘share the dream’. I hope that the Games have inspired disabled people to want to have a go and I hope that Birmingham can do England proud in 2022.

Have the Commonwealth games inspired you? Let us know on Twitter

Find out how Npower and Team England are inspiring the next generation of athletes

I get treated differently just because I’m disabled, I’m determined to change that

Michelle was born with cerebral palsy and growing up she never saw herself as different. Then she went to a mainstream college and everything changed. People treated her differently and it really knocked her confidence. Rather than let it beat her, it motivated her to change things and she’s been raising awareness ever since. For cerebral palsy awareness month, she shares her ‘dos and don’ts of disability’.

I grew up going to a specialist school so everyone around me was disabled from nursery up until I was 18. Then I went to a mainstream college and that was a big culture shock. I’d never seen myself as ‘different’ – I was just me – but college completely changed my outlook on everything. People treated me differently and it really knocked my confidence.

Until then I hadn’t realised that being disabled can make you so segregated – you could tell that certain people just didn’t want to talk to you, they didn’t want to get to know you. People would either make mean comments or be overly nice because they felt sorry for me and I felt like I was fighting a battle every day. I just wanted to be treated like everyone else.

Woman in a car smiling

I’ve never disliked anything about myself but going to college made me realise that not everyone is going to be accepting and you do need to work harder just to prove that you’re a ‘normal’ person.

I think a lot of the time it’s because people just don’t understand. If they have grown up around disability or known someone who’s disabled, it’s not surprising. Up until recently, you’ve never really seen disabled people in the media so, when someone sees someone who’s a bit different from them, they’re not going to know how to act or what to say.

A lot of the girls I went to college with said they’d never known someone who’s disabled. All they had was this made up idea that disabled people are all the same. They’ve got these preconceived ideas and then they’ve never met anyone who’s disabled to prove that idea wrong.

My experiences at college completely changed my outlook and made me determined to change things. People need to be educated, people need to see disabled people in the media more. Then being around disabled people won’t be a big deal, because it will just be what they’re used to seeing every day. It becomes the norm. In the meantime, here are a few of my dos and don’ts.

Man pushing woman in a wheelchair. Text says 'the dos and don'ts of disability'

Do talk to me

I’m perfectly capable of speaking for myself but people speak to the person I’m with instead of me – even doctors. I’m sitting right here, you should have enough respect to talk to me instead of talking about me. Then, when I answer, they still don’t speak to me and it’s so frustrating because I’ve just answered you, you can see that I’m perfectly capable of talking to you but you carry on ignoring me anyway.

Don’t talk down to me

People talk down to you or act like you’re stupid. You’ll be out somewhere and people will go “Aw are you okay?” like I’m a child. No. I’m 28. I don’t need you to speak to me like I’m stupid. When people are patronising and treating you like you’re stupid, that can be just as damaging on your self-esteem.

Do take my word for it if I say I don’t need help

People often go “Do you want help?” and I say, “No I’m alright thanks” and then they just take over and do it anyway, not listening to what I’ve said. Sometimes, they don’t even ask, they just do it.

And definitely don’t push my wheelchair without asking

Some people will just push my wheelchair. I’ll be out somewhere and someone will go “Oh I’ll push you” and I’m like “No I don’t need you to do that”. You’d never pick someone up and move them around.

Don’t assume we’re all the same

A lot of people think if they know someone with cerebral palsy, I’m going to be exactly the same. And some people are like “Well you can’t have cerebral palsy because you can do this or you don’t do that.” I know best. Not every form of cerebral palsy is the same.

Do see beyond disability

In the media, people either don’t show disabled people at all or when they do, it’s solely focused on that. Yes, I’m disabled, but I am more than that. I’m a person first. Cerebral palsy doesn’t come before me as a person.

We’re just ordinary people, we don’t want to be treated any differently.  We might do things differently or have to adapt, but we’re just human.

For more dos and don’ts, watch Michelle’s film.

Great to see disability represented at the Oscars, but how far do we still have to go?

Last night, the Oscars results showed that we are moving forward when it comes to representation of disability in film. The Shape of Water – a film featuring a disabled character and uses sign language – won best film (although a disabled actor playing her would have been even better). The Silent Child – which stars a six-year-old deaf British actress and tells the story of her struggle to communicate in a hearing world, won best live action short film.

In this blog, Max Dean, a film lover and writer, reflects on the history of disability in film.

As a fan of horror films, I realise that the representation of disability in this particular genre are, largely quite negative; the most recent and controversial case being M Night Shyamalan’s Split from last year starring James McAvoy.

Before and after the release professionals with patients of dissociative identity disorder (DID) expressed understandable concern over the stigma that the film could place with those living with the condition. Yet, just like Psycho’s portrayal of a real-life mental-health condition, the portrayal of DID in Split is nonsense. People with DID are no more prone to violence than any non-DID person.

Disability in historical cinema

In contrast, one of my favourite films of all time; James Whales’s Bride of Frankenstein (1935), has arguably, perhaps one of the most touching scenes with a disabled character in the history of cinema. To me, it perfectly captures the loneliness that those in the disabled community can face due to misunderstanding across our society and its preconceived perceptions.

In this sequence our main character, Frankenstein’s ‘monster’ comes across an older man with blindness who is living on his own in the woods, shunned by the villagers we see in other scenes who chase the ‘monster’ across the countryside. He befriends our main character. They provide each other with the one thing each has wished for; a friend and companion. The ‘monster’ himself is similarly treated as a monster due to his appearance and supposedly limited and baby like intellect. It is only when villagers come into his home and confront them both that he loses his friend.

In this context, disability is rather refreshingly, seen as a virtue and played in a positive and indeed, very humane light.

Disabled people must be given a genuine voice

A more recent film which has comparable character arcs in its story to the Bride of Frankenstein is The Shape of Water. Due to Sally Hawkins’ excellent performance this has won plaudits as a breakthrough in the cinematic presentation of disabled characters. With this however, it also raises the question of non-disabled actors playing disabled characters.

To show that cinema really embraces disabled people as equals, the film industry must therefore give disabled people a genuine voice. This can be achieved by not only giving more roles to disabled actors but the directors chair itself. Yes, these roles can be sympathetic, but they also must be truly empowered characters.

That would be a truer sign than any, that, we as a society have truly changed to embrace disability and recognised the worth of everyone in it.

What are your thoughts on this year’s Oscar winners? Start a discussion on our online community.

World Book Day – “How many characters can you think of that have a disability?”

To celebrate World Book Day yesterday (1 March) , we got in touch with writer and blogger, Emily Davison to talk books. Emily recently graduated with an Masters in Children’s Literature and was keen to tell us about some of her favourite disabled characters in Children’s and Young Adult Literature. 

World Book Day one of my favourite days of the year. Many of you might be dressing up as your favourite storybook character today, but ask yourself this question; how many characters can you think of that have a disability?

Admittedly there is not a huge deal of authentic disabled characters represented in children’s literature, however that certainly doesn’t mean to say that there isn’t any at all. There are a number of authors who have created authentic, relatable and positive disabled characters in their books and today I wanted to acknowledge their efforts.

So, without further ado, let’s begin!

Charlie Ashanti from Lionboy by Zizou Corder

Book cover of LionBoy

The Lionboy trilogy is a series about a young cat-speaking boy Charlie Ashanti who embarks on a journey across the world to rescue his kidnapped scientist parents.  Charlie is an incredibly interesting character alongside being mixed raced and growing up in a bi-cultural background, he also lives with an invisible disability. Charlie has asthma and throughout the series has to deal with the task of managing his health condition, alongside being the hero of story.

The series is an example of a book that features a disabled character without pigeonholing it as the main aspect of the book. Charlie is an empathetic, clever, competent and incredibly brave character and one that no one could help but admire.  This book remains one of my absolute favourite stories.

William Trundle from The Christmasaurus by Tom Fletcher

Christmasaurus

 The Christmasaurus tells the magical story of William Trundle who forges a very special friendship with a dinosaur. As a wheelchair user, William knows what it feels like to be different but that doesn’t stop him from having the journey of a lifetime when he and the Christmasaurus embark on a journey to return to the North Pole.

Tom Fletcher doesn’t scrimp on the important details that come along with being a disabled child, like when William gets bullied for his disability and experiences feelings of isolation or when William can’t use stairs due to his wheelchair. Past all the twinkling lights, singing elves and the magical dinosaur the story tackles serious issues of bullying, loss and overcoming internal ableism.

Linh Cinder from The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

lunar_chronicles

The Lunar Chronicles is a dystopian fairy-tale centered around the young cyborg mechanic Linh Cinder. Cinder is an amputee, having lost a hand and foot as a result of being caught in a fire accident as a child. However thanks to the advances of future technology, she becomes a cyborg fitted with computerised prosthetic limbs which enable her to regain her mobility.

Alongside her battles against the evil Lunar, Queen Cinder also battles prejudice and discrimination as a Cyborg, something that I as a disabled woman could relate to. Sometimes where disability is concerned especially in the fantasy or sci-fi genre there are more disabled characters than you might imagine, you just need to try looking at it another way.

Vanez Blane from The Saga of Darren Shan by Darren Shan

DarrenShan Saga

Now although Vanez Blane is a minor supporting character in the series, his story is certainly one worth mentioning. Vanez is the robust Games Master of Vampire Mountain, responsible for training the Vampire Generals.

He’s strong, skilled and and a highly respected Vampire in the community. Vanez is also partially sighted, having lost an eye in a fight with a mountain lion .Despite losing his sight, he continues to train the would-be Vampire Generals and can still put up a good fight in any duel!

Ms. Elwyn from Moses Goes to a Concert by Isaac Millman

Moses goes to concert

Moses Goes to a Concert is a fascinating depiction of deafness with its illustrations of sign language and its inclusion of a large cast of deaf characters, including Moses the protagonist. However, the character I want to draw your attention to the Ms. Elywn, a Percussionist who also happens to be deaf. On a visit to a concert she inspires Moses to one day become a percussionist like herself.

Her presence in the book is incredibly empowering to readers and reminds us all not to presume a disabled persons capability.

So those are a few of my favourite disabled characters that I have come across in Children’s Literature. Do you have any to add to my list? Comment below with your favourite disabled characters from literature.

You can see more of Emily’s work on her blog

Philip Hammond’s comments are deeply upsetting, but make me even more determined to fight injustice

Yesterday the Chancellor Philip Hammond suggested that a higher number of disabled people in the workforce has played a part in the “sluggish productivity in Britain’s economy”.

Helpline Facebook Live homepageDebbie, from Scope’s helpline, who works with thousands of disabled people and their families every year, has this to say about his comments:

I first saw Philip Hammond’s comments yesterday, after spending the day doing training with the Samaritans on how to deal with suicidal callers.

This training has become necessary for our helpline.

We deal with calls and queries from sick and disabled people in deep distress every day.

Many times, we’ve exercised our duty of care by alerting the authorities of serious welfare concerns.

We’ve called the police, we’ve called ambulances, and had many conversations with safeguarding teams at local authorities across the country.

To see such derogatory comments made in this day and age sparked an anger inside me and many of my Scope colleagues.

I’ve worked in front-line advice for 10 years, and the past four years has been the most challenging and difficult time I’ve ever known.

For me, these comments are a new and massive blow to disabled people.

Disabled people who have already ‘failed’ at being sick and/or disabled according to ESA (Employment Support Allowance) and PIP (Personal Independence Payments) assessments now stand accused of failing the economy too.

These are the same sick and disabled people who have been punished for the financial crisis through brutal cuts to social care and welfare benefits.

As a helpline, we’ve fielded queries from thousands of sick and disabled people affected by welfare reform, including some forced into work when they’re clearly not well enough or able to. Many have been forced into destitution and an uncertain future.

This is only going to get worse with Universal Credit, and we’re already seeing an increase in these types of queries.

I’ve spoken to many disabled workers who have gone through the DLA (Disability Living Allowance) to PIP transition, and have lost out.

It’s incredibly hard to be a productive employee when you’re going through the stress of appealing a benefits decision. But disabled people do it every day.

They turn up to work and are the best that they can be under extremely difficult circumstances.

Like the stress of losing your Motability car and being unable to get to work safely.

Or the stress you feel if you can’t pay your rent, or don’t have enough money to eat.

The in-work support available to disabled people, such as Access to Work, has also been cut and is very difficult to get.

Going through these horribly complex processes consumes you, exhausts you and affects every part of your life and your relationships with others.

The detriment to disabled people’s mental and physical well-being has been evident to us, and is far too common in our work.

I am human, my colleagues are human, we hurt and we feel. Some of us are parents to disabled children, or are disabled ourselves, and it’s sickening to hear such nastiness.

Despite the anger and devastation I feel about these comments, I’m even more determined to continue fighting for Everyday Equality. I know that my colleagues feel the same.

We’ve had blow after blow in recent years, and this for me was the final straw.

We will rise up and we will continue challenging all of the injustices, and we will do this together until there is Everyday Equality for disabled people and their families.

We want to hear how these comments have affected you too. Tell us, tell your local MP, tell anyone who will listen.

Enough is enough.

Scope has written to the Prime Minister asking her to clarify her position and called on the Chancellor to withdraw his comments. We’ve also explained why his comments are damaging and inaccurate.

Disability History Month 2017

To mark Disability History Month this year we’re looking at famous disabled artists who used their art to express What I Need To Say

Michelangelo

“If people knew how hard I worked to get my mastery, it wouldn’t seem so wonderful at all.”

Five years before his death Michelangelo was diagnosed with kidney stones. As a result, art historians have often focused on that and the possible repetition of kidney shaped designs in his work.

However, more recently, the debate has been around whether he also had gout or arthritis and if his work as a painter and sculptor exacerbated or eased his condition.  Portraits of the artist especially those showing his hands have been pored over to determine which condition he had. Michelangelo also included himself as an old man in several of his later works which has provided additional evidence for this debate.

Pietà bandini by Michaelangelo
Pietà bandini by Michaelangelo

Francisco Goya

“Fantasy abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters.”

Goya is often referred to as the last of the old masters and the first of the moderns. In 1793 he developed a severe but unidentified illness which left him deaf. After this, his work  – which had been characterised by portraits of society figures and tapestry designs – began to reflect a darker more pessimistic outlook. His portraits  came close to caricatures reflecting what Goya really saw rather than how his subjects might want to see themselves.

For a period towards the end of his life he lived an almost hermit-like existence in a farmhouse outside Madrid where he produced the famous Black Paintings – dark, sometimes gruesome murals painted in oils directly on the walls.

Francisco de Goya - Tio Paquete (oil on canvas, c.1820)
Francisco de Goya – Tio Paquete (oil on canvas, c.1820)

Frida Kahlo

“Feet, what do I need them for
If I have wings to fly.”

Frida Kahlo is probably best known as a feminist icon, but did you know she was also a disabled person? Kahlo was born with spina bifida, and after contracting Polio as a child was left with her right leg being thinner than her left. Following a severe car accident, Kahlo began painting self-portraits which depicted her impairments in a fearless way.

Frida Kahlo's 1939 oil painting “The Two Fridas.”
Frida Kahlo’s 1939 oil painting “The Two Fridas.”

Paul Klee

“A line is a dot that went for a walk.”

Klee was a German artist active during the first half of the twentieth century. As a child he had been a musical prodigy but as an adult his focused on his art. His theories and writing on the theory of colour were very influential and he taught with Kandinsky at the Bauhaus School of art.  His own work reflected a dry sense of humour as well as a sometimes childlike perspective.

One of his most productive periods was during the early 1930s but at the same time he was persecuted by the Nazis and forced to leave German. It was also during this time that he started to show the symptoms of scleroderma. It limited his output for a time until he modified his painting style to create more bold designs with his alternating moods making the paintings lighter or darker.

Klee’s scleroderma was only diagnosed ten years after his death in 1940 but World Scleroderma day is now on June 29, the date of his death.

Paul Klee Halme 1938
Paul Klee Halme 1938

Henri Matisse

“I have always tried to hide my efforts and wished my works to have the light joyousness of springtime, which never lets anyone suspect the labors it has cost me….”

Henri Matisse was one of the most innovative painters of the twentieth century. In 1941 he almost died from cancer, and after three months in recovery he became a wheelchair user. Matisse credits this period of his life with reenergizing him, even referring to the last 14 years of his life as “une seconde vie,” or his second life.

He adapted his artistic methods to suit life in a wheelchair, making artwork out of coloured paper shapes. You may have seen this work in the exhibition The Cut-Outs which was featured in the Tate Modern in 2014.

La Perruche et la Sirene by Henri Matisse 1952
La Perruche et la Sirene by Henri Matisse 1952

Yinka Shonibare, MBE

“Your head goes crazy if you pursue what ifs.”

Yinka Shonibare is a British conceptual artist with Transverse Myelitis, which paralyses one side of his body. Shonibare uses assistants to make work under his direction, and is famed for exploring cultural identity, colonialism and post-colonialism within the contemporary context of globalisation.

In 2004 he was shortlisted for the Turner Prize for his Double Dutch exhibition, and was awarded an MBE in the same year.

Nelson's Ship in a Bottle by Yinka Shonibare
Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle by Yinka Shonibare

Stephen Wiltshire

“Do the best you can and never stop.”

Wiltshire is an autistic savant and world renowned architectural artist. He learned to speak at nine, and by the age of ten began drawing detailed sketches of London landmarks. Recently, Wilshire created an eighteen foot wide panoramic landscape of the skyline of New York City, after only viewing it once during a twenty minute helicopter ride. The Stephen Wiltshire gallery can be found in Pall Mall, London.

Venice by Stephen Wiltshire MBE
Venice by Stephen Wiltshire MBE

Learn more about our What I need to Say campaign 

What does the general election result mean for our work?

Last week voters went to the polls to have their say in the General Election and on Tuesday MPs returned to a Parliament that looks different to the one they left a little more than eight weeks ago.

Following the election, the Conservatives, whilst remaining the largest party, lost their majority in Parliament. They are now looking to come to an agreement with the DUP, whereby the DUP will support them on key votes such as the Budget

Whatever happens, it is crucial that the Government and Parliament do not lose sight of addressing the barriers that prevent disabled people from taking fully part in society.

We know that in 2017, life is still much harder for many disabled people than it needs to be. This is something we believe the Government should urgently address.

We want the Government to listen to disabled people

The Prime Minister has spoken about creating a country where no one is left behind and where the challenges people face in their everyday lives are addressed. And in their manifesto the Conservatives said that they will confront the burning injustice of disability discrimination.

We want the new Government to listen to disabled people and make sure everyday equality for disabled people becomes a reality. Everyday equality is about ensuring that disabled people have the same opportunities in life as everybody else.

What we’re asking the Government

Before the election, we set out our calls to the next Government. As Parliament returns and ahead of the Queens Speech next week we are calling on the Government to:

Improve disabled people’s work opportunities by removing the barriers to work disabled people face. The Conservative manifesto made a commitment to get one million more disabled people in work over the next ten years and to improve disabled people’s employment support. We have been campaigning over the last few years for the disability employment gap to be halved and for support for disabled people both in and out of work to be improved. We want to see a complete overhaul of the Work Capability Assessment as it does not currently identify all the barriers disabled people face to work.

Enable disabled people to live independently by increasing investment in social care and reforming the social care system so it better supports working age disabled people. Social care was a big issue at the election and all parties have talked about the need for change. However, we are concerned that working age disabled people have not been part of the public debate on this issue. Working age disabled people represent a third of social care users and we are clear that they must be listened to and that support must work for them.

Improve disabled people’s financial security. We know that life costs more if you are disabled. Disabled people on average spend £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. The Conservative manifesto says the Government wants to “reduce the extra costs that disability can incur”.

We believe the Government should protect the value of disability benefits and develop a new Personal Independence Payment assessment which accurately identifies extra costs. It is also crucial that action is taken to ensure that the experiences of disabled consumers is improved. Disabled people’s households spend £249 billion a year, but all too often they receive a poor service from businesses.

Over the coming months as the Government sets out its plans, we will be working with MPs of all parties to ensure that these issues remain a priority and continue to campaign for everyday equality for disabled people.

I still don’t have the support I need to live a full life

Josie, from Bristol, was a nurse until 2008, when she developed a number of impairments which affect her health and mobility.

She has most recently been diagnosed with mast cell activation, a condition which affects immunity and increases the chances of anaphylaxis attacks.

In 2008, I was well and working as a nurse. Then I got ill, and just didn’t get better. I was eventually diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a neurological condition which causes pain all over the body.

I then suddenly developed idiopathic anaphylaxis – life-threatening allergic reactions caused by a range of things, from heat to pollen and perfume. It means I need to have a support worker with me when I go somewhere new in case I have a reaction.

My other health problems mean my mobility is limited, and I’m often ill in bed for several days at a time.

I recently got an electric wheelchair, which has been amazing and has given me some of my freedom back. I have two children who live with their dad, whom I see regularly. But I still do not have the support I need to live a full life.

Some days I barely get to speak to anyone

At the moment, I get three short visits a day from a care worker to cook my meals, help me shower, and keep the house clean. I get two hours every two weeks “social” time which at best on a good day gets me over the park and back .

It’s not long enough to join in any activities but I value this time hugely as it’s uninterrupted time with actual real conversation, not just “what do you need to eat?” or similar.

My basic needs are met – I’m clean and I’m fed. But I haven’t got enough support to actually get me out of the house. It means that some days I barely get to speak to anyone, let alone have a social life.

If I get an infection and have to ask my carer to pick up a prescription, I don’t get to have a shower that day. There just isn’t enough time.

Josie, a disabled woman, and her daughter

What the right support would enable me to do

A little more support – for example, a support worker to go with me to new places – would give me so much more opportunity to take part in life, but at the moment that feels like an impossible utopia!

People like me, who were professionals and could make a contribution with the right support, are being cut out of the workforce.

Working in an office or a hospital isn’t really possible for me, but I still have skills and experience that I would like to use, if I had the means of doing so.

Everyday equality by 2022

In the end, it is a question of equality. In a fair world, I would have the support I need to live my life, and the opportunity to fulfil my capabilities.

I’d be able to go out and have a social life. I’d have support to do some work, maybe based at home where I would be able to control my surroundings. Instead I don’t feel like I’m living, just existing.

Tell us what living independently means to you  

Scope is calling on the next government to improve social care for disabled people, so they can live the life they choose.

You can read more about Scope’s priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does living independently mean to you? What would getting the right support from social care enable you to do? Email the stories team and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.

How the next Government can make Everyday equality a reality

In just six weeks’ time voters will go to the polls to have their say in the General Election. 

Today we are setting out our calls for the next government – commitments and changes we are asking for so that by 2022 disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else: Everyday equality.

We know that in 2017, life is still much harder for many disabled people than it needs to be. Too often disabled people can’t access the support they need to at home, in education or work and face negative attitudes, extra costs and pressures on family life.

Action is needed in a range of areas which is why we would like the next government to take a cross-government approach to disability which tackles the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

Today we are calling for action in three main areas:

Improving disabled people’s work opportunities

Text on infographic reads: Disabled people are almost twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people

Many disabled people want to work but continue to face huge barriers without the support they need to find, stay and progress in work. The disability employment gap – the difference between the employment rates for disabled and non disabled people – has stood at over 30 percentage points for over a decade and less than half of disabled people are in work.

We are calling on the next government to commit to halving the disability employment gap and report publicly on the progress it is making towards this target. We also want to see reforms to the support disabled people receive in and out of work, including the Work Capability Assessment, changes to sick pay and ending benefit sanctions.  It is vital that the government also provide better careers advice, work experience and opportunities for apprenticeships for young disabled people.

Ensuring disabled people have support to live independently

Social care plays an important role in supporting many disabled people to live independently, work, build relationships and be part of their local communities. However, we know that over half of disabled social care users aren’t getting the support they need to live independently.  We believe the next government should invest in social care so that disabled people of all ages get the support they need.

It’s also vital that the government tackles the barriers disabled people face getting online as just 25 per cent of disabled adults have never used the internet compared to 8 per cent of non-disabled adults. The next government should commit to improving digital skills and increasing digital accessibility.

Improving disabled people’s financial security

Infographic reads: Life costs more if you're disabled. On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on disability related costs

Disabled people spend on average £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. Extra costs may include specialist equipment or higher heating bills.

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) is vital in helping disabled people meet some of these costs. Many disabled people face difficulties when applying for PIP and the assessment decision is often overturned at a later date.

We would like to see the next government protect the value of PIP and develop a new assessment that more accurately identifies the extra costs disabled people face.

Disabled people often have negative experiences as consumers and receive a poor service from businesses. That’s despite disabled people’s households spending £249 billion a year. Therefore, we are calling on businesses and regulators to improve the experiences of disabled customers and give greater consideration to how they can support them.

There are 13 million disabled people in Britain – a hugely significant number of votes – and 89 per cent of voting age disabled people have said they will vote at the next election. We are calling on all candidates to listen to and engage with disabled people and for whoever is next in government to deliver that strategy which will achieve everyday equality for disabled people.

Throughout the election look out for opportunities to engage with your local candidates at events, hustings and talk to them about what everyday equality means for you.

Infographic with text: There are 13million disabled people in the UK - 21 per cent of the UK population

Find out more about how you can register to vote in this election in our latest blog and share on social media what everyday equality means for you by using the hashtag #Everydayequality. 

“Having a job is life-changing”

Felix is a post room assistant at Boodle Hatfield LLP. In this blog, he talks about finding employment, employers attitudes and why disabled people should have the same opportunities as anyone else.

My early experiences of looking for work were quite challenging. For most people on the autistic spectrum there’s the challenge of communication. I’m no exception. I struggled with communication myself. For a while my confidence was low because of an experience I’d had in a previous job where my role was abruptly ended.

I was unemployed for 18 months and I had the feeling that I wasn’t going to get a job. But, with the right support  and doing various work experience opportunities, I was able to get my confidence back and be where I am today.

When it comes to employment, whatever other barriers exist, I think confidence is one thing that’s overlooked. Confidence will improve your chances of getting into work. Employers want confident people, whether they’re disabled or not.

Tailored support is important

Tailored support is important because not everyone’s needs are going to be the same and they need a different approach to meet those needs. Scope helped me with the basics – cover letters, CV writing, how to conduct yourself at an interview – as well helping me get my confidence back. They also set up a work placement which was one of the highlights.

I feel that Scope’s employment programme was that major catalyst for leading me into employment. Meeting the right people who can help with your career goal is important. I would definitely encourage young people to get involved in Scope’s employment services. Before that, I didn’t think I was going to be able to work for all the companies that I have done – law firms, Costa, HSBC, a legal support company.

Felix laughing with a friend

Having a job is life changing

My job is quite action packed. I enjoy being on my feet and keeping myself busy. Another thing I enjoy is having a laugh and socialising with the people that I work with.

Having a job is life changing. When you have a job there are certain things that you can do. You can contribute, you don’t have to rely on your parents. You can also do things for yourself that you couldn’t do before – things like getting new clothes, music, football. It gives you independence. Having a job is important for my financial security and independence. It gives me a sense of freedom – being able to do things that I couldn’t do before when I was unemployed. It also comes with responsibility – budgeting and making sure that your money is spent wisely.

My life right now, I’d rate it 9 out of 10. Even though I don’t have a place of my own yet, I think my life is pretty good. I’d like to be able to move out into my own place. It’s been on the cards for some time but I feel that I’m closer to doing that now.

What I want to see in future

In 5 years’ time want to see more disabled people in employment, more disabled people being present in society and more visibility in terms of trying to create that level playing field between disabled people and non-disabled people.

I want to see Scope keep up their campaigns and influencing work but the one-to-one support is also really important. I think the Government should encourage more tailored support programmes to meet the different needs of disabled people.

There are 13.3 million disabled people living in Britain today. Amongst that are disabled people who are looking for work. I honestly believe, from my experiences, that being disabled doesn’t have to be a barrier to you finding work. It will take the right support and you working to overcome the barriers that do exist to get what you want – just like any other goal in life.

At Scope, we work to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. There are 13 million disabled people in the UK today and life is still too hard for too many.

Our new strategy has been developed with disabled people and their families and sets out how we want to make this country a better place and drive positive, lasting change.

Disabled people still face extra costs of more than £500 a month, struggle to get into and stay in work and are not easily able to access financial support. Scope will campaign to make sure that more disabled people have the right to work in the job they choose and receive the support they need to manage the extra costs of disability.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy.