Category Archives: Inside Scope

Why employers should make gathering disability data a priority

Disabled people can and want to work, but too many face barriers to entering and staying in employment. Whilst there has been an increase in the rate of employment, disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people.

If we want to successfully tackle disability unemployment, then we firstly need to understand the scale of the problem.

We’ve been calling for businesses to improve their understanding of their disabled workforce. That’s why it’s positive that today the Government has announced plans to increase the gathering of disability data in the workplace. In a new framework it has published, the Government is encouraging employers to report on the number of disabled people they employ.

Below we outline what has been announced, and what we want to see happen next.

What does the framework focus on?

The Government has published a voluntary framework for large employers to report on mental health, well-being and disability.

On disability, employers are asked to report on the number of disabled people they employ, along with a narrative to explain what they are doing to recruit and retain disabled employees.

Why is reporting on disability data important?

Disabled applicants are a quarter less likely to be invited to an interview than a non-disabled person. And for every 100 disabled people who move into work, 114 leave.

By collecting and monitoring data on the number of disabled people in the workplace and their overall experience, employers will be in a much stronger position to understand where action is needed to tackle the barriers faced by disabled people, both in and out of work.

Employers already gathering disability data have told us about the value of doing so. Several have said that this information has helped them make the case internally for changes in their recruitment and HR practices.

We know that nearly half of disabled people have worried about sharing information about their disability at work. If reporting is to be a success, then employers will need to ensure their disabled employees feel confident enough to be open about their impairment or condition. This will help create a more inclusive and open environment for disabled people in the workplace, as well as ensuring that data gathered on disability in the workplace is robust.

What do we want to see building on from this framework?

The Government is taking an important first step in understanding better the barriers faced by disabled job-seekers and employees.

In order for reporting to have a real impact in tackling disability employment, there are a number of things that we want to see happen next:

  • The Government must ensure that there is a clear process for analysing any information gathered, and that this shapes future approaches towards increasing disability employment.
  • Any data collected and published by employers is easy to understand and is easy for disabled people to access.
  • As with the gender pay gap, reporting on disability data should eventually be a mandatory requirement for large employers, to encourage wider take-up of reporting on disability in the workplace.

What we will be doing next

We will be publishing a report early in the new year with data on the number of disabled people we employ, as well as data on staff well-being. This will be followed by a more comprehensive report looking at the experiences of disabled people at Scope.

We will also be encouraging employers to publish data in relation to their disabled employees. As part of this, we will be publishing a guide for employers setting out what data they should collect, and how to go about gathering this information.

Check out our website for information for disabled people in work.

Broadcasters commit to doubling the number of disabled staff by 2020. Why aren’t other industries doing the same?

The BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Sky have recently pledged their support to becoming ‘more inclusive’. Lord Hall, director general of the BBC, said: “As an industry we must do more to increase the number of disabled people working in broadcasting.”

In this blog post, we talk about the Inclusive Workplace Network, a membership network of companies who want to become more inclusive of disabled people – and how your company can get involved.

Work can be of fundamental importance to who we are

For many disabled people, work is of fundamental importance to who they are. Work is not just about the money in your pocket at the end of the day. It brings personal benefits and is seen by disabled people as a way to contribute to society, maintain social connections and promote self-worth.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at computer screens at work

While employment is identified by disabled people as being one of the biggest enablers to living the life you choose, getting into and staying in work can be a huge challenge. Disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people, and the difference in employment rates between both groups known as the ‘disability employment gap’, has remained at around 30 percentage points for over a decade.

To add to that, our recent research uncovered that one in two (53%) disabled people have experienced bullying or harassment at work because of their impairment or condition. And 58% of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their impairment.

It’s clear these things need to change

Disabled people tell us that there are many barriers that prevent disabled people from finding work and progressing in employment. These include negative attitudes from employers, colleagues and recruitment agencies, inaccessible workplaces, inflexible working practices and outdated policies.

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At Scope we know that to drive societal change we need to drive change in the workplace. We have been working with companies on improving attitudes, behaviours and processes. Many companies also recognise the commercial benefits of changing their culture and becoming more inclusive. The ‘purple pound’ is valued at £249 billion per year, with an online spend of £16 billion. Having a more inclusive working culture and employing more disabled people will give companies a better understanding of this large consumer group.

Gem smiles at the camera in her wheelchair in an office

The Inclusive Workplace Network

In response to these factors we launched the Inclusive Workplace Network, a membership network of companies who want to become more inclusive of disabled people. Members receive a thorough review of several aspects of their business, from their policies and HR processes through to their health and safety procedures. Based on this data collection and staff surveys, they’re given thorough advice, support and recommendations on improvements. We will also provide support from a Scope employment adviser, sessions with Scope Workplace Role Models who will share their stories, and invitations to employment events with other network members.

We will be hosting a breakfast meeting on 30 January 2019 at a Central London location for companies interested in joining the Inclusive Workplace Network. You’ll hear about practical ways in which your organisation can become more inclusive of disabled people by improving accessibility and changing perceptions of disabled people at work.

To register your interest in the event, please contact InclusiveWorkplaceNetwork@scope.org.uk

Our toolbox of tips that every parent of a disabled child needs daily!

The Ratcliffe Family consists of two dads, Garry and Kyle, and four kids – Haydn, Isobella, Curly and Phoebe – three of whom have a disability. Haydn has cerebral palsy and is blind in one eye, Bella has Downs Syndrome and Curtis has a number of impairments and conditions including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, global developmental delay and he is blind too.

Here Kyle and Gary, write a letter to you to help you in the journey to get a better start in life for your disabled child.

Dear Parent,

We are writing to you as two dads of four awesome kids.  Three of whom have a disability. We wanted to let you know about some of the things we have picked up over the years.  Our toolbox of tips, tricks and attitudes that every parent of a disabled child needs on a daily basis!

Tip one

Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Never let anyone tell you that your child “can’t” do something because of their disability.

It’s currently Half Term, and our kids are already exhausted!  It’s only Wednesday and we’ve already been punting on the river in Canterbury, pumpkin picking in Medway, Chinese buffet eating, Leeds Castle exploring and sightseeing in London.

Two adults behind four children in a London Eye Pod. Two children are in wheelchairs and three are wearing hats.
The Ratcliffe Family on the London Eye

Curtis loves the smell of the flowers, Bella loves the variety of food at the Chinese, Haydn enjoys being surrounded by different people to talk to, and Phoebe (our non-disabled daughter) gets the chance to explore and climb.

Each of our children gets something different out of every experience. Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Tip two

Warrior parent needs to come out every so often

Be prepared to face a side of you that you might never have seen.  Warrior parent needs to come out every so often.  When your child isn’t getting a good deal, don’t be afraid to challenge people.  Whether in a shop, during a visit to an attraction or a medical service you encounter on a regular basis.

There should never be an apology or excuse made for our children.  We always make sure they are treated equally. Good luck to any shop assistant that thinks it’s okay to show us to the disabled changing facilities in a shop, that is clearly being used as a second stock cupboard. Not acceptable.

Tip three

Start to build up a series of questions ready to challenge systems

What to do when you are at your wits end with frustration.  It will happen, regularly. Usually with people that really should know better.

Start to build up a set of questions. Use flashcards if you need to in the early days. Some questions we have found useful are:

  • “What policy does this ridiculous decision come from?”
  • “What is your complaints procedure?”
  •  “Who is your line manager?”
  • “Explain to me how this decision is in the best interests of my child?”
  • “Do you know the contact details for our local MP?”

These are all useful when challenging systems – systems that were often designed for the majority of the population  – but never designed for the people that need them the most!

Tip four

Appreciate the small things. Celebrate the smallest steps

As we are sitting here, writing this letter to you, we would like to say to you, appreciate the small things.  Celebrate the smallest of steps.  Live in the present and be thankful for every little success.

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Curtis smiling

Yesterday, we took about 50 photos of our son, Curtis, who was having a particularly good day. Not because he had just won a football match, not because he swam a length of the swimming pool. Not even because he managed to tie his shoelaces for the first time. But because he smiled. Yes, that’s right. Curtis smiled yesterday. The most infectious, smiley smile that you could ever imagine. A smile that curled up one side of his face. A smile that said “I’m really happy today, dad”. A smile that made us smile too. It’s not the big things that matter when you have a disabled child. It is the smallest step, the greatest achievements that mean the very best.

Last tip

Worry about the things you can control

Having a disabled child will mean that there are dark days as well as light ones.  But hey, that’s parenthood!  If you have a non-disabled child, you might worry about their friendship groups as they get older. We have worries too, as parents of disabled children. All we would say is, don’t let things worry you that you can’t control.  Worry about the things you can control which is why, right now, we are off outside.  To swing on a swing, slide on a slide, to push some warm hot chocolate through a feeding tube, and hope and pray for one more sunny day.

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The Ratcliffe family enjoying the seaside

Your sincerely

Garry and Kyle Ratcliffe

Now is the Time to be a Disability Gamechanger,  sign our petition calling for a new Minister for Disabled Children and Families.

Appoint the first ever Minister for Disabled Children and Families. This appointment would lead to improved accountability for how laws and policies affecting disabled children and their families are made. A dedicated Minister can strengthen how Government and services like the NHS work together to make sure families receive the right support.

Things like this stop me from living my life the way I want to

Bal is a post graduate student at Staffordshire University, disability activist, former President of their Student Union and has Generalised Dystomia.

In this blog Bal shares her campaign story to ensure taxi fares charge the same for all and how she helped change the law.

In 2015 I led a campaign to highlight the disgracefully high taxi fares that disabled people often face. It was stunningly successful; the law was changed, and bad practice prosecuted. But since then it appears taxi firms in my home town have blacklisted me.

Since moving out of home and becoming a student, taxi drivers have been a thorn in my side. I soon discovered that I was being charged significantly more for taxi journeys around the city than my non-wheelchair user friends, this moved me to act. I took part in undercover filming with BBC’s Inside Out which highlighted this existing national problem in a regional city setting. As a result of this, the law was changed. I then used this amended law by reporting the driver of a wheelchair accessible taxi to the local council’s Licensing department for refusing to take me to the train station. This driver was then successfully prosecuted and fined by the Magistrates Court.

A victory for wheelchair users

However, for me personally, because I was the public face of the case for the prosecution, not so much. I feel like I have been blacklisted in Stoke.  I find it impossible to book a taxi using my own name, (a task that seems to be easy for my non-disabled friends), with the taxi operators always saying that there are no available wheelchair accessible taxis when I give them my name.

Am I being paranoid? Well, when I wanted to go to the cinema with a mate, I rang to book a taxi; after being told by seven different companies that there were no wheelchair accessible taxis available I asked my friend to use her phone to try and book a taxi under a different name. She rang the first company that I had tried and they sent a vehicle straight away.

This is not a one-off event. Another example since the court case included not being able to attend a friend’s birthday meal. All the taxi companies that I called said that they had no accessible taxis available and, as I was alone, I couldn’t get anyone else to book the taxi for me. This left me with fear of missing out . On a recent night out, I was turned down by 15 taxis, despite using a small manual wheelchair that would fit in any car boot. Eventually after an hour in the cold and rain, a taxi agreed to take us.

Things like this stop me from living my life the way I want to

In a wider context taxi drivers overcharging or refusing to take people like me, prevents wheelchair users from living life with the same level of freedom as non-disabled people. Recently I was quoted £35 by one taxi driver and £10 by another on the same taxi rank, the disparity is shocking and has obvious financial implications. I have previously been quoted £55 for a 1-mile journey after a night out when the going rate for that trip is only £10 for everybody else.

Before I was involved with the court case I used taxis a lot more than I do now because they were reliable and on time and, the flexibility and convenience that they gave me was far preferable to using the bus service. However, since the court case I have had to change the way that I plan my journeys and my social life. I try not to let it stop me doing what I want to do, but in some instances, I simply have to change my plans and stay home because I have no way of getting where I want to be, especially at night. This really infuriates me as I feel I am being targeted.  I know that some people may say that I have brought this on myself, I don’t feel that I should have had to accept being discriminated against for being a wheelchair user.

Of course, I’m not alone in experiencing discrimination when travelling. Disability equality charity Scope have recently found that 40% of disabled people often experience issues or difficulties when travelling by rail in the UK and 25% of disabled people say negative attitudes from other passengers prevent them from using public transport. Although campaigning for equality has had some negative repercussions I will always continue to fight for fair and equal treatment with taxis and in all other aspects of life too.

This is a shout out to all taxi companies in Stoke on Trent, please let me know if you have got any wheelchair taxis that will be willing to take me and my friends and not overcharge us. After all I just want to be treated like everybody else.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with transport playing a huge part in this.  We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

Ensuring the next stage of Universal Credit rollout works for disabled people

Universal Credit is a benefit that provides financial support for people on a low income or who are out of work. It replaces a number of so-called “legacy” benefits. 

The Government is about to embark on the next stage of rolling out Universal Credit. It’s vital that there is a smooth transition for disabled people – however, we’re concerned about how this process will work.

We outline the changes we want to see to ensure disabled people do not face financial hardship during the next phase of Universal Credit roll-out.

What is Universal Credit and what is changing?

Universal Credit is a single benefit that replaces six means-tested benefits: Income Support, Income-related Jobseekers Allowance, Income-related Employment and Support Allowance, Housing Benefit, Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit.

There are a number of changes to the design and delivery of Universal Credit compared to “legacy” benefits. The benefit is being rolled out gradually, and there are currently 1.2 million claimants of Universal Credit.

Under a process called “managed migration”, all remaining claimants on “legacy” benefits will be moved on to Universal Credit. The regulations determining this process will have to be approved by Parliament before they are implemented.

What needs to change to ensure “managed migration” works for disabled people?

The Government has made a welcome commitment to get one million more disabled people into work by 2027. Universal Credit has a role to play in making this happen by ensuring that people are supported as they move into employment or increase their working hours.

However, there are a number of risks with the current regulations which could leave disabled people without adequate financial support as they move on to Universal Credit. Below are three key changes we want to see to the regulations for “managed migration”.

Ensure disabled people do not face gaps in financial support

Under the proposed regulations, all claimants moving over to Universal Credit will be required to make a new claim for the benefit within a period of one to three months. After this point, payment of “legacy” benefits will come to an end.

We are worried about this change, as we know many disabled people face difficulties with making a claim for Universal Credit. In a survey carried about by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), 53 per cent of those with a long-term health condition agreed that they needed more support setting up their claim, compared to 43 per cent of claimants overall.

Whilst the application deadline can be extended, there is a substantial risk that many disabled people could be left without any financial support, if they are unable to make a claim within the allocated time frame. This is particularly worrying as we know disabled people are more likely to experience debt and have fewer savings on average.

We want the Government to ensure payments of legacy benefits continue until a Universal Credit claim has been made successfully, so that disabled people do not face financial hardship as they move on to the benefit.

Improve the use of Universal Support

There is support available to individuals who need extra help in making a claim for Universal Credit. This is called Universal Support.

Whilst this is positive, we are concerned about whether the Government will be able to successfully identify claimants who would benefit from this offer of support, including many disabled people. For instance, disabled people in the Support Group of Employment and Support Allowance generally have limited communication with the DWP, meaning it is less likely that any communication and support needs are recorded.

We want to see the DWP proactively offer this service to all individuals at the start of the “managed migration” process. If somebody does not respond to DWP communications, then this should automatically trigger a referral to Universal Support.

Increase access to transitional protection

Transitional protection is extra money paid to top up someone’s award so they are no worse off when they move on to Universal Credit through “managed migration”.

In order to qualify for this support, an individual must ensure their claim is correct on their first attempt. If their claim is disallowed, then transitional protection will not be applied to any subsequent award.

However, research by the DWP shows that people with a long-term health condition were less likely to have completed their claim in one attempt – 46 per cent of respondents compared to 54 per cent of those without a long-term condition.

This means it is very likely that many disabled people will face barriers meeting the qualifying criteria for transitional protection due to challenges with the application process.

We want the Government to ensure that transitional protection is available for all claimants moving on to Universal Credit, irrespective of whether their initial claim is denied.

What will Scope be doing next?

We’ve been raising our concerns with the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, as well as Ministers within the DWP. We’ve also been speaking to a number of MPs and Peers.

We will be continuing to campaign to ensure that there is a smooth process for disabled people as they move on to Universal Credit.

What are your experiences of applying for Universal Credit? Share your story by emailing stories@scope.org.uk.

Designing content that puts disabled people and their families first

Scope wants to be the go-to organisation for disability information and support. We’re aiming to reach two million people a year, supporting disabled people and their families on the issues that matter most to them.

We want to make sure that people can access the information and advice they need easily – whether they are a customer of our services, are calling our helpline, or are looking for support and advice on our website.

This has meant re-thinking how we design and deliver our support and advice content. Our new approach has four central principles.

Content design

We design content to help people solve problems. Disabled people and their families are at the heart of our work. We ask them about their information needs and write content to meet those needs. Then we test the content with disabled people and their families and make improvements in response to what we find out.

Joining things up

Our policy team helps us plan content that supports our social change goals. Once the content is written, policy advisers join critique sessions to check and improve content before it’s published. We’ve built a great relationship with the policy team by working like this. And it means that the information and advice we give our customers is consistent with our public influencing work.

Evolution not revolution

We evolved our content design process during a ‘proof of concept’ project with a team of three. We’ve used what we learned to scale up to a team of nine, delivering advice and support content on a much more ambitious scale than Scope has done before. We use Kanban, a workflow management tool, to optimise the flow of work through the process. The Kanban ethos encourages us to carry on evolving and improving the way we work.

Open and transparent

Our processes and policies are written down and open to all. We have a clear content strategy and style guide. We use a shared Trello board to map the progress of each piece of content, which means we can easily spot if something is getting blocked and do something about it. If we see ways to improve how we work, we say so and agree what changes to make.

This is a summary of how we’re evolving the practice of content design to achieve our strategy, Everyday Equality. We’ll share more about how we work and what we’ve learned as our journey continues. Watch out for more posts from our content designers, user researchers and the people we work with.

Visit our employment section to see the first results of Scope’s new way of producing content.

‘We all want to live the lives we choose’

Jameisha talks about the impact of a hidden impairment and how attitudes affect her daily life.

As a young person living with Lupus and a few other hidden impairments, I have had my fair share of challenges confronting attitudes surrounding my conditions. These experiences often come from well-meaning people, but they are a marker of how we need to change as a society to be more understanding and inclusive.

I have become very self-conscious about how people see me as a young person with an invisible impairment. So many thoughts go through my mind. What’s everyone thinking when I sit in the priority seating area? Are people judging me for getting the lift instead of the stairs? Are people staring at me for using the disabled parking space at the supermarket. It got to the point where I wouldn’t take help in fear that I would be judged. Ultimately, the consequences impacted my health.

These thoughts have come from real life experiences

I’ve had comments from people on more than one occasion telling me to get the stairs instead of the lift because I am “so young and healthy.” I once plucked up the courage to ask for a seat in the priority seating area on the train because I couldn’t stand any longer on my bad hip. My request was met with blank stares and lowered heads. It still feels humiliating thinking about that as I write this.

To the left Jameisha's is looking direct at the camera. Half of her face is shown. She is wearing glasses, a headscarf and headphones. To the right, there is half a tube window with the big round sticker on the window which says Priority seating, please consider passengers when using this seat #travelkind

There are also many barriers when it comes to the workplace. Many employers out there do not understand hidden impairments. It’s so frustrating. Part of me trying to live the life I choose involves the ability to work, but I shouldn’t have to sacrifice my health in order to financially support myself. I’ve had numerous jobs where I’ve been transparent about my conditions, but employers still were not able to offer me the support I needed. In fact at one job, my contract was terminated due to a Lupus flare up.

No-one offers me help because they can’t see anything is wrong

I try not to think that people are inherently bad. I think having a visual aid plays a role in that. When dealing with Lupus on a day to day basis, no one offers me any help because they can’t see that anything is wrong. After my hip surgery when I was on crutches, random strangers were bending over backwards to help me. It was a very interesting experience to say the least. At the same time I should add that even with a visual aid like a walking stick, wheelchair or crutches, I have spoken to many people who still face obstacles when it comes to societal attitudes. We still have work to do.

Jameisha's hand outspread and face up, with the Please offer me a seat badge and card. The text on the card says Please offer me a seat, Remember not all disabilities and conditions are visible.

One thing I had to do, to live the life I choose is to change my own attitude

I decided to put my health first. If I need to get the lift, I have to overcome those thoughts that stop me from doing so. I continue to be transparent when applying for jobs and focus my attention one roles that will not cause further harm to my body. I still have trouble asking for a seat on the train, but I’m working on that. The Please Offer Me A Seat badges and signs I have seen on public transport have shown me that there are steps being made to change attitudes in how we treat people with hidden impairments.

We all want to live the lives we choose

That goes for non-disabled and disabled people. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to, and societal attitudes play a part in that. For me, as someone with an invisible impairment, something that will help is shifting the way we think. I definitely feel we are making positive changes, but I think we need to change faster. I hope that with more disabled people speaking out and being visible (whether their conditions are visible or not) we can get to a place where everyone lives the life they choose.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“my impairment left me feeling like I was on a deserted island but technology helped me feel at home”

Ajay, Service Desk Team Lead Analyst at Scope talks about his journey from the age of 16 to a working adult, showing how technology has helped him live the life he chooses.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at computer screens at work

For me living with an impairment is a bit like being in a relationship, you and your impairment know each other very intimately, you share every moment together, you sleep together, eat together and spend a lot of time getting to know each other very well. Like most relationships you also have conflicts, and both sometimes desire different things. This certainly was the case with my impairment and me.

As I got older my disability became worse and by the time I turned 16 years old I had lost all movement in my hands. From being able to write, play musical instruments or even feed myself, I was left with no movement at all. It was as if my impairment had left me on a deserted island with no hope of getting back home.

Technology changed my life for the better

This is where technology came into effect and really changed my life for the better bringing more control and freedom to it. I remember a time when I was watching TV at home and CNN showed an advert for a new piece of technology that had come out in the US called the Smartnav.

It was a device that would let you control the mouse using your head. It works by sending a signal to a piece of reflective material which you can attach anywhere and when you move that, it would control the mouse. You can click using additional switches or keys on the keyboard. When I learnt about this I immediately contacted the suppliers and purchased it from the US. At the time I could not operate the computer without assistance and if this worked I would feel not completely disabled again.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at his work screen on his chair and talking into his microphone

I remember when the first one arrived it was faulty, and I was extremely disappointed. It meant that I had to return it and wait for the next one to arrive which came in a couple of weeks. As soon as I plugged it in and configured it, I was hoping that this would change my life and let me use a computer again. When I started using it, it was amazing! I was able to control the mouse with precision and complete control. It had opened up a new world to me as I was able to use the computer again, and hope of getting off that deserted island had become a possibility again.

The internet was a complete life changer

As I got older, the Internet started taking over people’s lives and more and more Internet Service Providers were providing Internet connectivity to people’s homes. Being able to use the internet was a complete life changer for me also because it meant I could communicate with anyone around the world and I could research and look at whatever I wanted.

The next piece of technology, which completely transformed my life again was a device called the Housemate which I have been using since February this year.

This device with an app installed on your mobile, lets you control devices around your home. Being able to control the TV again was fantastic and I didn’t need to rely on having to ask someone to change channels or access recordings and so on. With this device I can control the TV completely, being able to record, playback recordings, change channels and fully operate my Sky box. Feeling bored was now not an option.

Technology gives me the independence to be part of society

Without technology I don’t think I could really survive in this world, being imprisoned in a body which cannot move can be very depressing at times and it’s something I would not wish anyone to go through. Finding different ways to keep your hopes up and trying to perceive things positively can sometimes be a job in itself and extremely tiring. Technology brings a breath of fresh air to my life, being able to live it the way I want, giving me the independence to be part of society, be employed and share experiences with friends and family.

There is no limit to what technology could bring to disabled people’s lives

What I would really like to see is developers and manufacturers to develop more technology and software to bring more freedom and independence to lives of many disabled people out there, who rely on technology not as a luxury, but as a means to get through life on a daily basis. I think if there was more awareness raised in Information Technology about the needs of disabled people, then there is no limit to what technology could bring to people’s lives and perhaps maybe someday it could even get me off this deserted island that my impairment left me on many years ago.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger, so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

People think there isn’t much prejudice towards disabled people, but this is my daily reality

Our new report, The Disability Perception Gap, reveals the extent of the negative attitudes that are held towards disabled people – and how many non-disabled people don’t realise the scale of the problem.

In this guest blog, Abbi, who has brittle bones, talks about her life as a young disabled woman – which is far from prejudice free – and why it’s vital that the public recognise this.

It’s May 2018, and my friends and I are on a university reunion weekend in Cambridge, dancing the night away in our favourite shabby student nightclub. As always, my being disabled is a practical consideration of the night – my friends are well-trained in lifting my wheelchair up steps, or dancing in a protective circle if the club is particularly crowded – but beyond that, I’m just part of the group.

Until suddenly, I’m not.

First, I notice a group of boys with a phone camera trained on me, laughing. The boy holding the phone turns the screen to his friend, who laughs too. In the centre of the screen is a video of me, dancing. I shrug it off.

Just as I’m beginning to forget the incident, a man leans down to my shoulder. If I were non-disabled, I might think he was going to offer me a drink, or warn me I’ve got my skirt tucked into my knickers, but as a young disabled woman in 2018, I know exactly what’s coming.

“I just want to say,” he shouts, “I think you’re really inspiring…”

Abbi, a young disabled woman, smiles as she sits in her wheechair

I live my life under the scrutiny of strangers

It’s been four years since Scope’s last report on public perceptions of disability, and I’ve been dancing in that Cambridge club for all of them. Perceptions have changed – but not enough. Disabled people continue to be stereotyped either scroungers, raking in benefits without contributing to society; or inspirations, overcoming all odds to bravely struggle to the shops (and maybe winning a few Paralympic medals along the way).

I’ve lost count of the number of times total strangers have unexpectedly started pushing my wheelchair along streets or across roads, apparently never considering how I would have appeared there in the first place, had I not been able to push myself. I’ve been ‘brave’ in supermarkets and ‘inspiring’ at bus stops; I’ve also been ‘faking it’ in a Blue Badge parking space, and ‘milking it’ at a train station.

I live my life under the near-constant scrutiny of strangers – yet, according to Scope’s recent study, only 22 per cent of non-disabled people still feel there is a lot of prejudice against disabled people, compared with 32 per cent of disabled people.

Until people acknowledge the persistence of prejudice, nothing will change

It’s true that, in theory at least, the UK is becoming more disability-friendly. Accessibility information is often clearly advertised on websites for theatres and events; job applications often reference the employer’s commitment to equality; high-profile court cases such as Doug Paulley’s case against FirstGroup suggest that disabled people can go anywhere, achieve anything.

In practice, even where buses and trains are accessible, wheelchair users continue to be refused access because the designated spaces are filled with luggage or pushchairs. Disabled people have to apply to an average of 60% more jobs than non-disabled people. People with invisible disabilities continue to be berated for using accessible services, or reported to fraud prevention hotlines (despite disability benefit fraud rates standing at under 1% – the lowest of any benefit). Even my own doctors are often surprised that my wheelchair is self-funded, wrongly assuming – like many non-disabled people – that the NHS provides appropriate wheelchairs for free.

It’s easy to see how non-disabled people might believe we live in a largely ‘disability-friendly’ country. The reality is starkly different – as disabled people, and their friends and families, know all too well. And until the non-disabled population recognises the persistence of prejudiced or unequal behaviours, attitudes and systems towards their disabled counterparts, it is impossible for the balance to change.

This report is the start of something, not the end. We will be working to better understand how negative attitudes impact on disabled people, and how these can best be tackled.

There’s no single fix for this problem, and as part of our campaign for everyday equality for disabled people, we’d like to hear about your experiences and what you would like to see change.

Will you support our campaign by telling us your experiences?

My big challenge – running the coast of Britain for Scope

A year ago, Chris Shipley decided that he needed a new challenge. On 26 February 2018 he started out from Southampton on a 5000 mile trip around the coast of Britain, which he plans to complete in under 10 months. In this blog he talks about his challenge and why he’s raising for money Scope.

I took up running four years ago. Since then I have taken part in two obstacle world championships and a European championship. I came first in an 18 hour endurance run and finished eighth in Europe’s “toughest mudder” race this year. Last year, I cycled back home from Switzerland through some of the worst floods seen in France.

A new challenge

I like to stretch myself physically and mentally. I read a book about someone who cycled the coast of Britain and was inspired by the story. I always wanted to do a long trip on foot or by bike. I was Influenced by Ed Pratt who is cycling around the world on a unicycle.

I didn’t really plan anything!! I chose the direction and date and saved up some money. I tested out my gear by camping locally in cold conditions.

How it’s going

So far, I’ve ran over 1400 miles and had some great experiences along the way.

I set off from my home in Southampton and just over 2 months later, I reached the most northerly point in Britain – John O’Groats.

It’s tough going at times, I’m on my third pair of running shoes! I vary the mileage according to the terrain but most days on average I’ll do a marathon each day, around 26 miles. On my best day so far I managed an astonishing 42 miles.

I carry a tent, cooking equipment, food, clothes and not much more, so I can stop pretty much anywhere.

There have been a few ups and downs but I never let situations get me down. When I started my challenge the “beast from the east” arrived but I soldiered on. I’ve encountered all that the British weather can throw at me and still carry on!

Food keeps me going although I haven’t had a burger in a while! I keep focused on the goal ahead and reaching the end of the challenge. The fabulous scenery and people you meet are really helping to keep my spirits up and keep me going.

My nephew Alfie has cerebral palsy and he’s the reason I’m raising money for Scope. We love the work that Scope does to create equality for disabled people. My mum also works as a carer so it’s something we’re all really passionate about.

Raising money for a worthy cause that supports people is important to me. Testing myself both mentally and physically is also very important.

Highlights along the way

I’ve met many people on my trip so far and have been overwhelmed by the support and encouragement. There really are some great people out there. I’ve even talked to pupils at a school about my challenge and used the opportunity to talk about Scope’s amazing work.

Man standing in a school gym

There have been so many highlights so far. Whilst running through Skegness, I saw an opportunity to top up my fundraising so I stopped and completed a “hang tough” challenge, went sailing in Scotland and even met a cyclist going around the coast of Britain going the opposite way and lots of other challenges.

Man standing outside a fairground ride.

If I reach my target, I’ll do an extra challenge

If this wasn’t a big enough challenge, I’ve decided to up the ante and complete a challenge within a challenge. If I raise £5000 before 21 June I’ll run for 24 hours straight from 6pm to 6pm the next day. Please sponsor me – not only will you been helping me achieve my goals,  but supporting a great charity that’s close to my heart.

You can sponsor Chris on his JustGiving page and follow his journey around the coast.