Category Archives: Inside Scope

Designing content that puts disabled people and their families first

Scope wants to be the go-to organisation for disability information and support. We’re aiming to reach two million people a year, supporting disabled people and their families on the issues that matter most to them.

We want to make sure that people can access the information and advice they need easily – whether they are a customer of our services, are calling our helpline, or are looking for support and advice on our website.

This has meant re-thinking how we design and deliver our support and advice content. Our new approach has four central principles.

Content design

We design content to help people solve problems. Disabled people and their families are at the heart of our work. We ask them about their information needs and write content to meet those needs. Then we test the content with disabled people and their families and make improvements in response to what we find out.

Joining things up

Our policy team helps us plan content that supports our social change goals. Once the content is written, policy advisers join critique sessions to check and improve content before it’s published. We’ve built a great relationship with the policy team by working like this. And it means that the information and advice we give our customers is consistent with our public influencing work.

Evolution not revolution

We evolved our content design process during a ‘proof of concept’ project with a team of three. We’ve used what we learned to scale up to a team of nine, delivering advice and support content on a much more ambitious scale than Scope has done before. We use Kanban, a workflow management tool, to optimise the flow of work through the process. The Kanban ethos encourages us to carry on evolving and improving the way we work.

Open and transparent

Our processes and policies are written down and open to all. We have a clear content strategy and style guide. We use a shared Trello board to map the progress of each piece of content, which means we can easily spot if something is getting blocked and do something about it. If we see ways to improve how we work, we say so and agree what changes to make.

This is a summary of how we’re evolving the practice of content design to achieve our strategy, Everyday Equality. We’ll share more about how we work and what we’ve learned as our journey continues. Watch out for more posts from our content designers, user researchers and the people we work with.

Visit our employment section to see the first results of Scope’s new way of producing content.

‘We all want to live the lives we choose’

Jameisha talks about the impact of a hidden impairment and how attitudes affect her daily life.

As a young person living with Lupus and a few other hidden impairments, I have had my fair share of challenges confronting attitudes surrounding my conditions. These experiences often come from well-meaning people, but they are a marker of how we need to change as a society to be more understanding and inclusive.

I have become very self-conscious about how people see me as a young person with an invisible impairment. So many thoughts go through my mind. What’s everyone thinking when I sit in the priority seating area? Are people judging me for getting the lift instead of the stairs? Are people staring at me for using the disabled parking space at the supermarket. It got to the point where I wouldn’t take help in fear that I would be judged. Ultimately, the consequences impacted my health.

These thoughts have come from real life experiences

I’ve had comments from people on more than one occasion telling me to get the stairs instead of the lift because I am “so young and healthy.” I once plucked up the courage to ask for a seat in the priority seating area on the train because I couldn’t stand any longer on my bad hip. My request was met with blank stares and lowered heads. It still feels humiliating thinking about that as I write this.

To the left Jameisha's is looking direct at the camera. Half of her face is shown. She is wearing glasses, a headscarf and headphones. To the right, there is half a tube window with the big round sticker on the window which says Priority seating, please consider passengers when using this seat #travelkind

There are also many barriers when it comes to the workplace. Many employers out there do not understand hidden impairments. It’s so frustrating. Part of me trying to live the life I choose involves the ability to work, but I shouldn’t have to sacrifice my health in order to financially support myself. I’ve had numerous jobs where I’ve been transparent about my conditions, but employers still were not able to offer me the support I needed. In fact at one job, my contract was terminated due to a Lupus flare up.

No-one offers me help because they can’t see anything is wrong

I try not to think that people are inherently bad. I think having a visual aid plays a role in that. When dealing with Lupus on a day to day basis, no one offers me any help because they can’t see that anything is wrong. After my hip surgery when I was on crutches, random strangers were bending over backwards to help me. It was a very interesting experience to say the least. At the same time I should add that even with a visual aid like a walking stick, wheelchair or crutches, I have spoken to many people who still face obstacles when it comes to societal attitudes. We still have work to do.

Jameisha's hand outspread and face up, with the Please offer me a seat badge and card. The text on the card says Please offer me a seat, Remember not all disabilities and conditions are visible.

One thing I had to do, to live the life I choose is to change my own attitude

I decided to put my health first. If I need to get the lift, I have to overcome those thoughts that stop me from doing so. I continue to be transparent when applying for jobs and focus my attention one roles that will not cause further harm to my body. I still have trouble asking for a seat on the train, but I’m working on that. The Please Offer Me A Seat badges and signs I have seen on public transport have shown me that there are steps being made to change attitudes in how we treat people with hidden impairments.

We all want to live the lives we choose

That goes for non-disabled and disabled people. Unfortunately, not everyone is able to, and societal attitudes play a part in that. For me, as someone with an invisible impairment, something that will help is shifting the way we think. I definitely feel we are making positive changes, but I think we need to change faster. I hope that with more disabled people speaking out and being visible (whether their conditions are visible or not) we can get to a place where everyone lives the life they choose.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

“my impairment left me feeling like I was on a deserted island but technology helped me feel at home”

Ajay, Service Desk Team Lead Analyst at Scope talks about his journey from the age of 16 to a working adult, showing how technology has helped him live the life he chooses.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at computer screens at work

For me living with an impairment is a bit like being in a relationship, you and your impairment know each other very intimately, you share every moment together, you sleep together, eat together and spend a lot of time getting to know each other very well. Like most relationships you also have conflicts, and both sometimes desire different things. This certainly was the case with my impairment and me.

As I got older my disability became worse and by the time I turned 16 years old I had lost all movement in my hands. From being able to write, play musical instruments or even feed myself, I was left with no movement at all. It was as if my impairment had left me on a deserted island with no hope of getting back home.

Technology changed my life for the better

This is where technology came into effect and really changed my life for the better bringing more control and freedom to it. I remember a time when I was watching TV at home and CNN showed an advert for a new piece of technology that had come out in the US called the Smartnav.

It was a device that would let you control the mouse using your head. It works by sending a signal to a piece of reflective material which you can attach anywhere and when you move that, it would control the mouse. You can click using additional switches or keys on the keyboard. When I learnt about this I immediately contacted the suppliers and purchased it from the US. At the time I could not operate the computer without assistance and if this worked I would feel not completely disabled again.

Ajay, wheelchair user, looking at his work screen on his chair and talking into his microphone

I remember when the first one arrived it was faulty, and I was extremely disappointed. It meant that I had to return it and wait for the next one to arrive which came in a couple of weeks. As soon as I plugged it in and configured it, I was hoping that this would change my life and let me use a computer again. When I started using it, it was amazing! I was able to control the mouse with precision and complete control. It had opened up a new world to me as I was able to use the computer again, and hope of getting off that deserted island had become a possibility again.

The internet was a complete life changer

As I got older, the Internet started taking over people’s lives and more and more Internet Service Providers were providing Internet connectivity to people’s homes. Being able to use the internet was a complete life changer for me also because it meant I could communicate with anyone around the world and I could research and look at whatever I wanted.

The next piece of technology, which completely transformed my life again was a device called the Housemate which I have been using since February this year.

This device with an app installed on your mobile, lets you control devices around your home. Being able to control the TV again was fantastic and I didn’t need to rely on having to ask someone to change channels or access recordings and so on. With this device I can control the TV completely, being able to record, playback recordings, change channels and fully operate my Sky box. Feeling bored was now not an option.

Technology gives me the independence to be part of society

Without technology I don’t think I could really survive in this world, being imprisoned in a body which cannot move can be very depressing at times and it’s something I would not wish anyone to go through. Finding different ways to keep your hopes up and trying to perceive things positively can sometimes be a job in itself and extremely tiring. Technology brings a breath of fresh air to my life, being able to live it the way I want, giving me the independence to be part of society, be employed and share experiences with friends and family.

There is no limit to what technology could bring to disabled people’s lives

What I would really like to see is developers and manufacturers to develop more technology and software to bring more freedom and independence to lives of many disabled people out there, who rely on technology not as a luxury, but as a means to get through life on a daily basis. I think if there was more awareness raised in Information Technology about the needs of disabled people, then there is no limit to what technology could bring to people’s lives and perhaps maybe someday it could even get me off this deserted island that my impairment left me on many years ago.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with digital and assistive technology playing a huge part in this. We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger, so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

People think there isn’t much prejudice towards disabled people, but this is my daily reality

Our new report, The Disability Perception Gap, reveals the extent of the negative attitudes that are held towards disabled people – and how many non-disabled people don’t realise the scale of the problem.

In this guest blog, Abbi, who has brittle bones, talks about her life as a young disabled woman – which is far from prejudice free – and why it’s vital that the public recognise this.

It’s May 2018, and my friends and I are on a university reunion weekend in Cambridge, dancing the night away in our favourite shabby student nightclub. As always, my being disabled is a practical consideration of the night – my friends are well-trained in lifting my wheelchair up steps, or dancing in a protective circle if the club is particularly crowded – but beyond that, I’m just part of the group.

Until suddenly, I’m not.

First, I notice a group of boys with a phone camera trained on me, laughing. The boy holding the phone turns the screen to his friend, who laughs too. In the centre of the screen is a video of me, dancing. I shrug it off.

Just as I’m beginning to forget the incident, a man leans down to my shoulder. If I were non-disabled, I might think he was going to offer me a drink, or warn me I’ve got my skirt tucked into my knickers, but as a young disabled woman in 2018, I know exactly what’s coming.

“I just want to say,” he shouts, “I think you’re really inspiring…”

Abbi, a young disabled woman, smiles as she sits in her wheechair

I live my life under the scrutiny of strangers

It’s been four years since Scope’s last report on public perceptions of disability, and I’ve been dancing in that Cambridge club for all of them. Perceptions have changed – but not enough. Disabled people continue to be stereotyped either scroungers, raking in benefits without contributing to society; or inspirations, overcoming all odds to bravely struggle to the shops (and maybe winning a few Paralympic medals along the way).

I’ve lost count of the number of times total strangers have unexpectedly started pushing my wheelchair along streets or across roads, apparently never considering how I would have appeared there in the first place, had I not been able to push myself. I’ve been ‘brave’ in supermarkets and ‘inspiring’ at bus stops; I’ve also been ‘faking it’ in a Blue Badge parking space, and ‘milking it’ at a train station.

I live my life under the near-constant scrutiny of strangers – yet, according to Scope’s recent study, only 22 per cent of non-disabled people still feel there is a lot of prejudice against disabled people, compared with 32 per cent of disabled people.

Until people acknowledge the persistence of prejudice, nothing will change

It’s true that, in theory at least, the UK is becoming more disability-friendly. Accessibility information is often clearly advertised on websites for theatres and events; job applications often reference the employer’s commitment to equality; high-profile court cases such as Doug Paulley’s case against FirstGroup suggest that disabled people can go anywhere, achieve anything.

In practice, even where buses and trains are accessible, wheelchair users continue to be refused access because the designated spaces are filled with luggage or pushchairs. Disabled people have to apply to an average of 60% more jobs than non-disabled people. People with invisible disabilities continue to be berated for using accessible services, or reported to fraud prevention hotlines (despite disability benefit fraud rates standing at under 1% – the lowest of any benefit). Even my own doctors are often surprised that my wheelchair is self-funded, wrongly assuming – like many non-disabled people – that the NHS provides appropriate wheelchairs for free.

It’s easy to see how non-disabled people might believe we live in a largely ‘disability-friendly’ country. The reality is starkly different – as disabled people, and their friends and families, know all too well. And until the non-disabled population recognises the persistence of prejudiced or unequal behaviours, attitudes and systems towards their disabled counterparts, it is impossible for the balance to change.

This report is the start of something, not the end. We will be working to better understand how negative attitudes impact on disabled people, and how these can best be tackled.

There’s no single fix for this problem, and as part of our campaign for everyday equality for disabled people, we’d like to hear about your experiences and what you would like to see change.

Will you support our campaign by telling us your experiences?

My big challenge – running the coast of Britain for Scope

A year ago, Chris Shipley decided that he needed a new challenge. On 26 February 2018 he started out from Southampton on a 5000 mile trip around the coast of Britain, which he plans to complete in under 10 months. In this blog he talks about his challenge and why he’s raising for money Scope.

I took up running four years ago. Since then I have taken part in two obstacle world championships and a European championship. I came first in an 18 hour endurance run and finished eighth in Europe’s “toughest mudder” race this year. Last year, I cycled back home from Switzerland through some of the worst floods seen in France.

A new challenge

I like to stretch myself physically and mentally. I read a book about someone who cycled the coast of Britain and was inspired by the story. I always wanted to do a long trip on foot or by bike. I was Influenced by Ed Pratt who is cycling around the world on a unicycle.

I didn’t really plan anything!! I chose the direction and date and saved up some money. I tested out my gear by camping locally in cold conditions.

How it’s going

So far, I’ve ran over 1400 miles and had some great experiences along the way.

I set off from my home in Southampton and just over 2 months later, I reached the most northerly point in Britain – John O’Groats.

It’s tough going at times, I’m on my third pair of running shoes! I vary the mileage according to the terrain but most days on average I’ll do a marathon each day, around 26 miles. On my best day so far I managed an astonishing 42 miles.

I carry a tent, cooking equipment, food, clothes and not much more, so I can stop pretty much anywhere.

There have been a few ups and downs but I never let situations get me down. When I started my challenge the “beast from the east” arrived but I soldiered on. I’ve encountered all that the British weather can throw at me and still carry on!

Food keeps me going although I haven’t had a burger in a while! I keep focused on the goal ahead and reaching the end of the challenge. The fabulous scenery and people you meet are really helping to keep my spirits up and keep me going.

My nephew Alfie has cerebral palsy and he’s the reason I’m raising money for Scope. We love the work that Scope does to create equality for disabled people. My mum also works as a carer so it’s something we’re all really passionate about.

Raising money for a worthy cause that supports people is important to me. Testing myself both mentally and physically is also very important.

Highlights along the way

I’ve met many people on my trip so far and have been overwhelmed by the support and encouragement. There really are some great people out there. I’ve even talked to pupils at a school about my challenge and used the opportunity to talk about Scope’s amazing work.

Man standing in a school gym

There have been so many highlights so far. Whilst running through Skegness, I saw an opportunity to top up my fundraising so I stopped and completed a “hang tough” challenge, went sailing in Scotland and even met a cyclist going around the coast of Britain going the opposite way and lots of other challenges.

Man standing outside a fairground ride.

If I reach my target, I’ll do an extra challenge

If this wasn’t a big enough challenge, I’ve decided to up the ante and complete a challenge within a challenge. If I raise £5000 before 21 June I’ll run for 24 hours straight from 6pm to 6pm the next day. Please sponsor me – not only will you been helping me achieve my goals,  but supporting a great charity that’s close to my heart.

You can sponsor Chris on his JustGiving page and follow his journey around the coast.

The things that people say never go away

Our new report, The Disability Perception Gap, reveals the extent of the negative attitudes that are held towards disabled people – and how many non-disabled people don’t realise the scale of the problem.

Marie is a college tutor, wife and mother whose experiences feature in the report. In this blog, she revisits some funny and not so funny moments, and talks about the impact of negative attitudes.

I’ve got osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as brittle bones. It means my bones can break easily so I use wheelchair, I can’t stand or walk. I’ve experienced negative attitudes throughout my life – some awkward moments you can’t help but laugh at, and others which have actually held me back from living my life.

Because I’m disabled I couldn’t possibly have a love interest

I can’t tell you the number of times people have bumped into lampposts or tripped over on the street because they are too busy staring at me. When I’m out with my husband Dan, it can be even worse.

Once, when we’d just started dating, we were on the way home from the pub, holding hands and we stopped to look at the stars. What could be more romantic? A kiss seemed like the natural thing to do.

After a moment, I became aware that a police car was driving past very slowly. The officer was staring out of the window and was concentrating so hard on us that he ended up mounting the pavement and crashing into a street sign. We couldn’t believe it! A few seconds later he sped off, clearly embarrassed.

We still laugh about that incident now. We have to laugh – if we took these things too seriously it could start to mess with our heads.

Marie and Dan kiss outside the church on their wedding day
Marie and Dan share a kiss on their wedding day

We often hear people making comments. People don’t blink an eyelid if they see any other couple kissing in the street but because I’m in a wheelchair and Dan’s not, we become an immediate target. I think when people see us, they can’t quite believe that a guy who isn’t disabled could have fallen in love with me.

If Dan and I aren’t being affectionate, it’s a different story. Trying to convince people he’s my husband takes some doing. One time, a hospital consultant asked me if Dan was my dad! When I said no, she presumed he was my brother, then my uncle, and finally my carer. I let her go on and on before she petered out. It’s that  assumption that because I’m disabled I couldn’t possibly have a love interest.

I was told “We don’t have any jobs for people like you”

When I finished my degree in Health and Social Care in 2011 I didn’t have a lot of luck finding a job. I went to the Job Centre for support and their attitude was “Why do you want to work?” and “We don’t have any jobs for people like you.” There was no help or aspiration.

Being told not to bother working made me feel angry and upset. I’d spent so many years studying, I’d put everything into my degree, I’d worked in the past and I wanted to progress. It made me feel worthless, like I couldn’t contribute towards society like anyone else.

Woman wheelchair user holding a sign saying "#workwithme"
Marie features in Scope and Virgin Media’s employment campaign, Work With Me

I decided not to put that I was disabled on my CV because I felt like I wouldn’t get an interview. I often managed to get interviews but when I turned up I could tell by people’s reactions that I wasn’t going to get that job. I think it was largely because they didn’t understand my impairment and didn’t want to take the chance.

If you’re disabled, it can be difficult to progress in your career too. I’ve had many different jobs and at times I felt like I was being treated like a child because employers didn’t allow me to use my skills and knowledge. I ended up leaving one job. If people aren’t going to accept me for who I am and what I can do, why stay?

The things that people say to you never go away. There have been times where bad attitudes have made me feel like “What’s the point in working?” I just wanted to find an employer who would give me a chance, like anyone else would be given a chance.

This report is the start of something, not the end. We will be working to better understand how negative attitudes impact on disabled people, and how these can best be tackled.

There’s no single fix for this problem, and as part of our campaign for everyday equality for disabled people, we’d like to hear about your experiences and what you would like to see change.

Will you support our campaign by telling us your experiences?

Our new report shows disabled people still face negative attitudes

Our new report, The Disability Perception Gap, reveals the extent of the negative attitudes that are held towards disabled people – and how many non-disabled people don’t realise the scale of the problem.

The way other people act towards us can have a huge impact on how we view ourselves and our role in society. An occasional moment of rudeness or being ignored may be a minor inconvenience or annoyance. But the more it happens, the more the impact adds up.

For many disabled people, this will sound all too familiar. Whether it’s outright hostility, or seemingly minor incidents that add up to a hostile atmosphere, prejudice remains a common occurrence. Negative attitudes from others can be one of the biggest barrier to disabled people living life the way they want, and more needs to be done to tackle them.

The research in this report was carried out on behalf of Scope by the National Centre for Social Research as part of the annual British Social Attitudes Survey.

What is the Perception Gap

According to our new research released today, one in three disabled people still feel that there’s a lot of prejudice against disabled people. But only one in five non-disabled people think the same. This is what we’re calling the disability perception gap.

It may seem self-evident that disabled people face prejudice, but many non-disabled people do not understand the scale of the negative attitudes towards disability.

Some difference wouldn’t be surprising – disabled people have to live with this prejudice every day, whereas non-disabled people may only ever know about it second hand.

But this gap is growing. In 2000, there was only a slight difference between the views of disabled and non-disabled people when it came to disability prejudice. Over the last 20 years, however, the gap has trebled.

Illustration of the gap in perception between disabled and non-disabled people
“The gap between disabled and non-disabled people’s views of prejudice has trebled since 2000” – Disability Perception Gap

There is now a real danger that many non-disabled people think that disability prejudice has been tackled long before it has been, which could block further attempts to improve the situation. Instead of this complacency, we need to make sure that the experiences of disabled people are listened to and put at the heart of any programme designed to address negative and harmful attitudes.

Being close to disability can help

When it comes to improving understanding, it seems that nothing beats personal contact with a disabled person. Whether it’s a colleague, a friend or a family member, having a relationship with a disabled person makes a real difference to non-disabled people’s attitudes.

For example, 10 percent of people who claim not to know any disabled people think of disabled people as ‘getting in the way’ some of the time – an opinion held by only 3 percent of people with a disabled colleague.

However, a third of the population claim not to know a single disabled person. This means that their views on disability are far more likely to be based on stereotypes than any knowledge of what life is like for a disabled person.

Any attempt to improve attitudes will have to increase people’s understanding of what it means to be disabled, and the challenges that disabled people face on a daily basis.

Driving change

To do this requires a concerted effort across society to tackle prejudice and negative attitudes towards disabled people. This should include a variety of spaces; from the classroom to the boardroom, and all points in between.

This is why we are calling for efforts to get more disabled people into work to be amplified. With only 7 percent of people saying they have a disabled colleague, a million more disabled people in work could make a real difference to people’s views of disability and disabled people.

It’s why we’re calling on the media to do more to ensure that disabled people and their experiences are properly represented on screen. By supporting disabled talent, they can show what it means to be disabled in 2018.

Such efforts on their own will help, but they won’t be sufficient. We need a coherent approach to improving attitudes across all areas of life. Earlier this week the Government announced a new working group to look at the issues facing disabled people.

We’re calling on this group, and the rest of Government, to take prejudice seriously and launch a new cross-departmental disability strategy, focussed on improving attitudes and reducing prejudice towards disabled people.

What comes next?

This report is the start of something, not the end. We will be working to better understand how negative attitudes impact on disabled people, and how these can best be tackled.

There’s no single fix for this problem, and as part of our campaign for everyday equality for disabled people, we’d like to hear about your experiences and what you would like to see change.

Will you support our campaign by telling us your experiences?

Could you be part of the next generation of disability campaigners?

We are looking for aspiring young campaigners to join Scope for Change, our campaign training programme for disabled people aged 18 to 25. It’s a free, six-month programme, and no previous campaigning experience is needed. Find out more and apply to take part.

Disabled people face many barriers to equality – whether it’s negative attitudes, unnecessary extra costs, inaccessible environments or a lack of support in education or work. But we know that it doesn’t have to be this way, and that young disabled people have the drive and skills to help make change happen.

We first launched the Scope for Change programme in 2016 to support young disabled people gain the skills and confidence to campaign on issues they cared about . This first group of campaigners set out to tackle a variety of issues: encouraging museums to be more autism-friendly, making British Sign Language lessons at university more accessible and affordable, gaining step-free access to local transport, and raising awareness of hidden impairments.

Ellie, who took part in 2016, campaigned for greater accessibility at nature reserves. Here’s what she had to say about her campaign:

“I want to further educate those working in the conservation sector to make sites of natural interest as accessible as possible: providing ramps up to bird hides, having blue badge parking spaces, braille or audio information boards, allowing assistance dogs, and accessible toilets… Opening up the senses in particular for those with profound and multiple disabilities is so important – and where better to do that than a national park?”

It wasn’t just their campaigns that benefited – many of the group said that being part of Scope for Change gave them a sense of solidarity with other disabled people and boosted their confidence. No longer feeling like they were working alone, the campaigners could collaborate, share experiences and learn from each other.

Why get involved?

Now Scope for Change is back for a new generation, to tackle more obstacles on the road to everyday equality. We want disabled young people to be empowered to make decisions about their lives, influence change, and make real progress in their communities and wider society.

Over a six-month period, we will support the Scope for Change group to plan, launch and their own campaigns to make change on the issues that matter to them. This will be backed up with ongoing support from Scope staff and a three-day residential training event to learn all the skills needed to create a winning campaign strategy.

Does this sound like the opportunity for you? Apply for Scope for Change now – applications close on Monday 28 May.

When I became disabled no-one would hire me, but Scope helped me find a job I love

Simone never had a problem looking for jobs before she became disabled. She had good references, experience and qualifications, but when she developed repetitive strain injury, it seemed like none of that mattered. After 15 months of getting no responses, Simone had lost her confidence and her hope. In this blog, she talks about how Support to Work helped her turn things around.

I developed repetitive strain injury a few years ago, a condition which affects my arms and my hands. My employer did try to make adjustments – things like speech recognition software and an adapted keyboard – but it got to a point where being on a computer even for 20 minutes caused so much pain. So, I made the decision to change career.

I didn’t think finding another job would be too difficult. I knew I wouldn’t be able to do lots of computer work, but I had so many transferable skills. But after 15 months of applying for jobs with no response, I lost hope. It got to the point where I was just applying for anything.  It didn’t matter what it was or what the pay was, I was just desperate to work. But I still couldn’t find someone to employ me.

A woman stares into the distance, in front of a bus stop
Disabled people, on average, have to apply for 60% more jobs than non-disabled people.

It was probably the lowest point of my life

It really knocked my self-worth and my self-confidence. You start to feel like you’re not worthy of being employed despite having a great career history. I felt like all my qualifications had been for nothing.

I felt lost, and when you get to that point, you need someone who can sit down with you and go “Okay, so these are your strengths and these jobs would suit you.” But I couldn’t find anyone willing to help. One agency told me “It’s unfortunate but employers will look at you as a liability.”

Then I got in touch with Scope.

The right support turned my life around

They were really quick to get started. When the employment adviser, Zaid, looked at my CV he said, “Wow, this is brilliant. I’m confident that we can help you.”

A women holder a file with office behind her

“I felt a sigh of relief. It felt like someone finally had my back, after months of feeling so alone.”

The main thing that Support to Work helped me with was my confidence. Because my confidence had taken such a huge knock, I didn’t feel like an employer should employ me. I didn’t think I was worth it. But when Zaid made so many nice comments about my CV and gave me so many ideas for what I could do, I started to believe in myself again.

I think I’d been coming across as negative on applications, but he helped me find the right approach to tell employers about my condition and talk about what I can do with simple adaptations.

With my new-found confidence, I applied for a role as Operations Assistant and I got an interview straight away. The interview went really well and I was offered the job! I felt uplifted. I was so happy. I was smiling for days.

For a long time, I couldn’t see a future but Support to Work really turned my life around.

Two women and a man chatting in an office, holding mugs
If you’re a disabled job-seeker, Support to Work can help you build confidence and develop skills for your job search.

My advice for employers

I love my job and I feel like my employers have exactly the right attitude. At the interview, I talked about my condition and they said, “You’ve got the skills we’re looking for, it won’t be a problem”. It put me at ease straightaway. I wish all employers thought like that when it came to hiring people.

Once in work, employers should make conversations about adjustments easy. In my current role, I feel confident that I could ask for changes if I needed them. I’ve got an open communication with my manager so if I do have any problems we can find a way to work around it. I also think they should be open to doing things differently. At work, I’m not afraid to say, “Look this is a bit much, can we do it a different way?”

Another piece of advice is to take advantage of schemes like Access to Work, which paid for my adaptive equipment – things like dictation software and an adapted keyboard – it hasn’t cost my employer anything and it enables me to do my job well.

Ultimately, I want employers to look beyond someone’s impairment or condition and focus on the skills and experience that they would bring to the role. Just because someone is disabled, doesn’t mean they won’t be an asset for your organisation.

Support to Work is funded by Virgin Media as part of our three year partnership to understand and tackle the issues disabled people face getting into and staying in work.

Our ambition is to reach one million disabled people with employment information and support by the end of 2020, so they can get into work, stay in work and realise their career ambitions.

If you’re a disabled job seeker, you can sign up to Support to Work on Scope’s website.

Tell the Government about your experiences as a disabled consumer

Last week the Government published a consultation called Modernising Consumer Markets, which is looking at ways to improve how different markets work for consumers.

We know that disabled people often face challenges as consumers, which can drive up the cost of essential goods and services. Below we outline what this consultation is about and some of the changes we want to see for disabled people.

What is this consultation looking at?

This Government wants to hear about ways to improve consumers’ experiences across different markets. This includes both regulated services such as energy and insurance, as well as private sector businesses selling things like food and clothing.

Whilst the Government wants to ensure that markets are competitive, there is an acknowledgement in this consultation that no one should be exploited if they lack the time or capacity to engage, and that “vulnerable” consumers need to be protected.

Some of the proposals the Government is considering including making it easier for consumers to compare the performance of businesses, and simplifying terms and conditions when consumers enter into new contracts. The Government is also interested in the role that data could play in helping consumers get the best deals or receive targeted support and advice – recognising the need to balance this with preserving privacy for consumers.

Improving disabled people’s experiences as consumers

There are almost 14 million disabled people in the UK, whose combined household expenditure, the so-called ‘purple pound’, totals £249 billion a year.

However, we know that disabled people often face challenges as consumers, which can drive up the cost of essential goods and services. Our research shows that on average, disabled people face extra costs of £570 a month related to their impairment or condition.

In some instances, disabled people are unable to access the products or services they need. For instance, our research shows that over half (55 per cent) of disabled adults have been unable to make a purchase because of an inaccessible website. Tackling these barriers is key to ensuring consumer markets work for disabled people.

Disabled people commonly tell us about experiences of poor customer service or a lack of disability awareness from businesses. We want to see a more consistent approach from businesses to supporting disabled consumers, particularly within regulated markets.

It’s also important that consumers are able to seek redress when something goes wrong. However, disabled people say that they are often put off making a complaint because of things like the length of time it can take and a lack of trust in the process. These challenges need to be addressed as part of this consultation.

How you can get involved?

This consultation is an opportunity for you to share your consumer experiences. The deadline for responses is 11:45pm on 4 July 2018.

You can email a response to ConsumerGreenPaper@beis.gov.uk

If you’d prefer to send a written response, you can write to:

Consumer Green Paper Team
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
1st Floor, Orchard 3
1 Victoria Street
London
SW1H 0ET

What Scope will we be doing

We will be submitting a response to this consultation, highlighting the changes needed to ensure disabled people receive a fair experience across different markets.

We want to ensure this consultation reflects the issues facing disabled people as consumers. You can share your experiences with us by completing this short survey.

For further information about the consumer green paper, please contact Ben Wealthy in the policy team on ben.wealthy@scope.org.uk.