Category Archives: Inside Scope

Say hello to our £4000 jackpot winner, Liz!

Liz was the lucky winner of £4000, in our Christmas 2016 Jackpot Draw. Liz has been giving to Scope since the late 1990s, and started buying raffles in 2003. She tells us how she felt when she found out, and why she supports us by joining in with our raffles.

How did you feel when you found out you had won top prize?

I never thought I would win! My first reaction was that I wanted to give some of the money back to charity. I found out just after Christmas, and it was nice to have all my family there to tell them. Everyone was so surprised and excited!

What are you going to spend your winnings on?

I’m going to give some of the money back to Scope, and some to another charity, where a family friend works. We’re then going to split the rest of the money between my family. My daughter has recently become engaged, so the timing of this win was perfect.

What does Scope mean to you?

Scope seems to be a very worthwhile charity- I’ve been supporting Scope for a number of years. I used to be a teacher and I taught several disabled students, I once went on a trip with one girl who had cerebral palsy and she joined in with everything. I think it’s important for people to not be treated as different, and I think this is something Scope is really passionate about. I always liked to buy raffle tickets to support Scope, but I really never thought I’d win!

Would you like to win the top prize like Liz did? You’ve got to be in it to win it! Join our Spring Jackpot today for a chance to win £4000, whilst supporting our vital work with disabled people and their families.

Visit our new online technology hub – in partnership with AbilityNet

Technology is transforming the lives of disabled people. We are working with tech experts from AbilityNet to highlight some of the software and equipment that can make life easier, more productive and fun in our new technology section.

Adapting your computer

Sometimes your existing computer has accessibility features on your existing PC that you might not be aware of. Try My Computer My Way, a free, interactive tool developed by AbilityNet that makes any computer, tablet and smartphone easier to use.

Check out our keyboard shortcuts, too!

Computers and autism

People with autism spectrum disorders can use a variety of multimedia applications and programs to experience the world around them within clear and safe boundaries.

How tech can support people with learning difficulties

Find out about touchscreens, keyboard and mouse alternatives and software that can help people with learning difficulties to access computers.

Visual impairment apps and suppliers

For people who have difficulty seeing conventional displays, there are many useful apps and specialist suppliers in visual impairment products. Other options to accessing information online include magnification and screen-reading.

Voice recognition

If you think you have never used voice recognition, think again! Voice recognition is becoming more and more mainstream so if you have a Windows computer or an Apple product, you already have it! Find out how you can use voice recognition more effectively.

Computer training and resources

One of the biggest barriers to disabled people accessing technology is training. We offer links to a wide range of private and voluntary organisations that offer computer training and support for disabled people.

Talk tech

Join our online community to talk to an AbilityNet advisor to discuss technology.

Read our equipment tips.

AbilityNet is a UK charity that helps older people and disabled people of all ages use computers and the internet to achieve their goals at home, at work and in education.

We want to see reform of the PIP assessment

The Government recently announced changes to Personal Independence Payment (PIP) that would tighten up access to PIP for disabled people. We are concerned that this will result in disabled people missing out on vital support to help meet some of the additional costs they face as a result of their impairment or condition, on average £550 a month.

Figures today show that 65 per cent of claimants are successful at tribunal when they challenge a decision on their PIP assessment.

This shows that the PIP assessment is not currently working effectively for disabled people. Below, Abbi, a young disabled woman, shares her experiences of the process of applying for PIP.

Abbi’s story

When the little brown envelope informing me of the need to apply for PIP dropped through my letterbox, I was nervous.

Since first qualifying for Disability Living Allowance (DLA) in 2009, my health has deteriorated. Both the benefit itself and the access to the higher rate for the mobility component have made coping with this significantly easier.

With my mobility continuing to deteriorate, the thought of being rejected for PIP (as has happened to many of my disabled friends and contacts) filled me with fear.

“It did not seem to have been designed for disabled people”

Applying for PIP was a complicated process and one which did not seem to have been designed for disabled people. First, I had to spend 45 minutes on hold to the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to confirm that I wished to apply. Ironically, I only had time for such a call because I was off work for health reasons.

I have a hearing impairment and once the phone was answered, I found it very difficult to hear the speaker. However, a request to conduct the conversation over email rather than by phone was refused.

The rest of the process told a similar story. I filled out an application form which did not leave sufficient space for me to detail all of my conditions and medications.

“My assessment took one and a half hours”

I had to reschedule my first assessment due to access issues and was told that assessments can only be rescheduled once. If I was unwell on the day of the rescheduled assessment, I would have to apply again.

Upon arrival at the assessment centre, a sign on the door informed me that my assessment would take no more than 20 minutes, yet my assessor did not appear to have any of the information which I had painstakingly written out in my application form. Instead, she expected me to answer every question again, verbally.

My impairments are complex, but nowhere near as complex as those of other disabled people I know. My assessment took one and a half hours.

The PIP system remains inefficient

When the news came, I was incredibly relieved to hear that I would be awarded the equivalent of what I was awarded under DLA. I still have access to both the services and the funding which permit my independence. I can plan for a future, even as my mobility deteriorates.

However, when I read the Atos report on my health, I found multiple serious errors. It included the suggestion that I experience one of my most disabling conditions ‘once a month’.

I don’t understand the confusing series of deadlines by which I was supposed to have submitted different documents or why those documents were so blatantly dismissed.

Four years after its foundation, the PIP system remains inefficient, inept and, in many cases, potentially harmful to the mental and physical health of many disabled people in the UK. I am immensely grateful for the assistance and security which my PIP award affords me but, as the government threatens further cuts to PIP, I remain fearful for others who have yet to apply.

With one week to go until changes to PIP come into place, we are calling on Government to think again. We are briefing government officials about why it is so important that they don’t go ahead with these changes.

Instead, we want to see reform of the PIP assessment so that it accurately captures the range and level of disabled people’s extra costs.

We want to hear why PIP is important to you or your experiences of getting PIP. If you’d like to share your story, please comment below or email stories@scope.org.uk.

For further information about PIP, visit Scope’s website or call our helpline for free on 0808 800 3333.

Donate to Scope with Apple Pay

Our supporters can now make donations instantly with Apple Pay.

We’re one of 25 charities that have been supported by Apple Pay to offer a speedy and secure way to donate. This has allowed us to make the process of giving to Scope faster and easier by removing the need to enter billing and contact information on web forms.

If you’re using an Apple device simply go to our donation page, select ‘Once’ as your donation and option and the Apple Pay button should appear. 

Donations are vital to keep things like our helpline running.

Paula contacted our helpline after learning she had cerebral palsy at the age of 60. Until then, she had never received any kind of support. Our helpline provides valuable support and is only possible thanks to donations from supporters.

Thankfully, in 2017 there are more ways than ever to donate to charity. That’s why we’re delighted to be working alongside Apple Pay to launch a more convenient and modern way of fundraising.

Contactless payment technology has been revolutionary across the commercial sector, with hundreds of companies and customers benefiting from the speedy and secure way to pay. We’re really excited to be at the forefront of this technology in the charity sector, giving our supporters another way to make donations and support disabled people and their families.

Apple Pay works on Safari with iPhone SE, iPhone 6 and later, and Apple Watch.

Our helpline is only possible thanks to donations from supporters. You can help us be there for disabled people and their families by donating to Scope today with Apple Pay.

No one expects to find out they have cerebral palsy at 60

Meet Paula, who contacted our helpline after learning she had cerebral palsy – at the age of 60. Until then, she had never received any kind of support.

In January 2015, soon after my mother died, my sister called me and told me I should see my doctor as there was ‘something I should know.’ I went to my GP and asked him to read me the medical notes from my birth. He told me that I had mild cerebral palsy.

I’m 60 years old, and I had known nothing about it until then.

My mother and I had not been in touch for 23 years, for many reasons. I will never know why she didn’t tell me.

There was more of a stigma around disability at that time, so maybe that was a part of it. Or perhaps she thought that because I didn’t need a wheelchair or anything, it wasn’t worth doing anything about. Sadly, attitudes still need to change.

Blaming myself

Not knowing about my cerebral palsy has made my life a lot more difficult than it really should have been.

My movements are awkward and slow, meaning I need extra time to do things. My speech also causes me difficulties. When I’m tired, it’s really hard for people to understand me – almost impossible if I’m exhausted.

Paula and her baby son
Paula and her son

But all my life I blamed myself for my differences, and thought I was just clumsy and slow. I drove myself into the ground trying to keep up at work, and that took its toll on me emotionally. When shown a job, it takes me longer to learn, and it often resulted in people getting annoyed with me.

I was never offered any extra support when I found things difficult. In one job, my colleagues would go home after they had finished their work, leaving me to finish my part alone. A supervisor once said she ‘felt like shaking me’.

I always tried to remain positive and upbeat, but it had a huge impact on my self-esteem and confidence. If I had known more, I think I would have stood up more for myself. And I could have asked for support with things such as my speech, which would have made a big difference for me.

Scope’s support

I rang Scope within a fortnight of finding out, and they sent Olli, a regional response worker, out to visit me. I thought she would have no time for me, but she came out the very same week. She said she had never met anyone who didn’t know about their condition until my time of life.

Olli has been fantastic, and having her information, advice and support has been excellent. With her guidance, I have sought out speech therapy, which has greatly improved my speech. I have also had physiotherapy and seen a continence nurse, and I have had rails installed in my bathroom.

Paula and her husband
Paula and her husband, who have just celebrated their Ruby wedding anniversary.

Life today

And just having this knowledge about myself has changed my life for the better. I feel much less agitated. I always felt I needed some kind of help, but I never knew what I needed or who to ask. I’m finally making up for lost time. I’ve now got the confidence to try new things; I go to Tai Chi, I swim and I am a bell ringer.

 I feel the things I have had to deal with in life have made me focused, determined and positive. I’m more aware of other people’s problems, and how they are feeling.

Excitingly, I’ve recently become a grandma. This got me thinking about my own experiences and how much things have changed. What happened to me – my disability being brushed under the carpet – I wouldn’t want to happen to any child today.

Our helpline is only possible thanks to donations from supporters.

You can help us be there for disabled people and their families by donating to Scope today. Your gift can support services such as our helpline, offering vital information and guidance to those who need it – whether 6 or 60.

Reform is needed to halve the disability employment gap

The Government’s Green Paper consultation on Work, Health and Disability closed last week. Find out how we responded to the consultation and which areas we argued need action from the Government.

The Government has made a welcome commitment to halve the disability employment gap – the difference between the employment rate of disabled people and non-disabled people – which has stood at around 30 percentage points for over a decade. If the Government is serious about increasing disability employment, then it must tackle the barriers individuals face to entering, staying and progressing in work.

Improving out-of-work support

Too many disabled people aren’t getting support to get into and remain in employment. Where disabled people do access support, at Jobcentres or through employment support schemes, many feel it is too generic and does not take account of their needs or interests.

It is vital that all disabled people who want to work have access to voluntary, specialist support that is tailored to their needs. Taking part in any form of employment support should be completely voluntary for disabled people, and have no impact on the financial support they receive.

As well as this, Scope wants to see a total reform of the “fit for work” test, the Work Capability Assessment (WCA), which decides whether someone is able to receive Employment and Support Allowance.

Currently, the WCA fails to capture the range of barriers to work that disabled people face, which means many individuals are not getting the right support to move in to work. That’s why we’re calling for the WCA to be replaced with separate assessments for financial support and employment support needs.

Supporting disabled people in work

New research by Scope has found that in the last year 58 per cent of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their impairment or condition. That’s why it’s so important that once disabled people take up jobs, the right support is in place to enable them to stay in work.

Something we want to see is an expansion – and better promotion – of Access to Work, a scheme that provides disabled people with financial support to work. We also want to see the requirement to take Statutory Sick Pay in consecutive blocks to be lifted. This would give individuals more flexibility in taking time off from work, for example through part-time sickness absence or a phased return to work.

Working with employers to drive change

Efforts to halve the disability employment gap will only be successful if we see a shift in how disabled people are perceived in the workplace. The need for action is clear – 85 per cent of disabled people feel employer attitudes haven’t improved since 2012.

Building on progress made with other aspects of workforce diversity, employers should shift from compliance with the law to taking a more proactive approach to attracting, recruiting, supporting and developing disabled employees.

For instance, the Government’s Disability Confident scheme – which provides guidance to employers on hiring disabled people – has a Business Leaders Group which is well-placed to drive best practice among employers through new research and peer-to-peer networking. However, it is crucial that this group has sufficient scope and capability to realise such an ambition.

Next steps following the Green Paper

Scope welcomed the opportunity to respond to this Green Paper. However, this will only lead to change if Government and employers take meaningful steps to tackle the barriers disabled people face to entering and thriving in work.

Therefore, we would like to see a cross-government strategy for disability employment – presented as a White Paper – as soon as possible. This should include a range of reforms to support disabled people in and out of work, along with clear indicators to determine the success of these. It is vital that any proposals are informed by the experiences of disabled people.

Find out more about Scope’s work to tackle barriers to employment for disabled people.

Why can’t the romantic hero be disabled?

Ellie Darkins is a romance author who has been published by Mills and Boon, Crimson Romance and Harlequin Books. Her latest book, ‘Holiday with the Mystery Italian’, features a disabled business tycoon as the romantic lead.

In this blog, Ellie talks about where the idea of including a disabled person came from, where she did her research and what she hopes the book will achieve.

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, it’s my pleasure to bring a little romance to the Scope blog! I write romance-packed novels for Mills & Boon, and my latest hero, the gorgeous, glamorous, gold-medal-winning Mauro, also happens to use a wheelchair.

I didn’t set out to write a hero with a disability. The early ideas for this book all centred around the concept of a couple meeting on a dating show, and from there I started thinking about who might be tempted to give that sort of experience a go, and why.

I always envisioned my hero as someone who is up for any challenge and any adventure, and it was when I started digging into why he was like this, it became clear to me that he had had some sort of accident in the past that made him not want to miss out on anything in life. That’s when it occurred to me that he could still be living with the physical effects of that accident, as well as the emotional ones.

Ellie Darkins, a romance novelist, and her family stand in a line whilst smiling and all holding up Ellie's disabled brother who is laughing
Ellie and her family laugh whilst holding up Ellie’s brother

Doing something different

Once it became clear to me that my hero had a physical impairment, I had some big decisions to make. When I read some other romances with disabled characters, I found some beautiful, touching stories. But in most of them, the impairment was a key part of the character’s journey. I knew I wanted to do something different – to write a character whose disability isn’t part of the story. A good romance is packed with conflict, with plenty of barriers standing between the hero, the heroine and their “happy ever after” – but I saw no reason for Mauro’s wheelchair to be one of them.

They say “write what you know” and in this case, I’ve been able to draw from a real-life example of someone who lives with a disability without letting it define them. My brother has had chronic lung disease since birth, but (while I have no desire to know the details!) it has never been an issue in his dating life. What it does do, occasionally, is throw up practical issues, such as the time my family nearly missed a flight home from Italy while the airport security staff tried to decide whether they would allow his oxygen cylinder onto the flight. They decided they would, but took so long that everyone had to run to make it to the gate in time.

Making Mauro as real as possible

Researching the practicalities of Mauro’s disability was an important part of writing the book for me. While I didn’t want his wheelchair use to be a big part of the romance storyline, it was important to me to try and portray Mauro’s life in a way that reflected the experiences of his real-life counterparts. I was in the privileged position of being able to give Mauro a bank balance that helps overcome many challenges, but even his billionaire lifestyle can’t get rid of all obstacles or remove all ignorant people from his path.

I hope Mauro and Amber’s story has done justice to the everyday challenges of the many wheelchair users who have shared their stories on this blog and elsewhere, and to whom I owe a debt of gratitude.

With Scope’s own Twitter poll revealing that three out of four people would like to see more representations of disability in literature, I hope that you’ll welcome Mauro’s story, and be as open to falling in love with him as I was.

Ellie Darkins, a romance author, smiles at the camera

Scope have been looking into the lack of disability representation in literature during National Storytelling Week. We hope that many more publishers and authors, like Ellie, include better representation of disabled people in books.

Visit Ellie’s website to find out more.

On Saturday 11 February, we are also giving you the chance to win one of two copies of ‘Holiday with the Mystery Italian’, find out more on our Facebook page.

Our priorities – influencing government in 2017

It already seems that Brexit is set to be the biggest political story of 2017 with the Government expected to trigger Article 50, beginning the formal process of the UK leaving the European Union, by the end of March. We think it is really important that disabled people’s voices are heard as part of this process and vital that progress towards equality made in recent years is not lost.

There will also be plenty of other important moments throughout the year and we will be working hard, with you, to make sure issues which affect disabled people’s lives stay high on the political agenda.

Social Care

Social care was hitting the headlines at the end of 2016, with warnings from the Local Government Association and Care Quality Commission that the system is in crisis. With the Government accepting a long-term solution to care funding needs to be found, social care is likely to remain high on the political agenda in 2017. Some additional funding will enter the system this year through an increase in council tax and from the Better Care Fund, but with a funding gap of £4.6 billion, this won’t provide the long term solution needed to meet rising demand and costs.

Social care is the support disabled people rely on to get up, get dressed, get out, and lead independent lives. Without that support disabled people can become isolated, can’t contribute to society and risk slipping into crisis. That’s why we are campaigning for long-term and adequate funding for care. Over 400,000 working age disabled people rely on social care, and with much of the recent focus on how care affects older people, we will be continuing to raise awareness with decision makers of disabled people as users of social care. 55 per cent of disabled care users tell us the system never supports their independence, so we are campaigning for a care system which supports disabled people to live independently and have choice and control over their care.

Employment

In February the Government’s consultation on disability, health and work will close. We want to see the Government take the opportunity to bring about real reform of the support disabled people receive both in and out of work.

The Government announced in October last year that people with severe conditions will receive continued Employment Support Allowance without needing repeated Work Capability Assessments. This is a welcome change but we want to see the Government go further in 2017 and completely overhaul the Work Capability Assessment so that it identifies the full range of barriers disabled people face to work.

We believe disabled people must be protected from any additional conditions linked to the support they receive. We would campaign against any attempts to impose requirements on disabled people receiving support.

The Government want to hear from disabled people about their experiences of employment support services and at work. Read more about how you can submit evidence to the consultation. Later in the year we are expecting the Government to publish a more detailed plan about how they intend to reform support for disabled people following the consultation, and at Scope we will be pushing for swift action.

Employers also have a key role to play in halving the disability employment gap. 85 per cent of disabled people think employer attitudes haven’t improved over the last four years and more needs to be done to encourage employers to create flexible modern practices. The Government should set out a long-term vision for Disability Confident this year and develop a campaign promoting the business benefits of disability employment.

Despite significant pressure on the Government from MPs from all political parties, the reduction in financial support for new claimants in the Work Related Activity Group of Employment Support Allowance is going ahead in April 2017. We will continue to raise concerns about the harmful impact this will have on disabled people and call on the Government to reserve this decision.

Extra costs

Following the publication of the Extra Costs Commission Progress Review in late 2016, we’ll be continuing to campaign to drive down the extra costs disabled people face and working with businesses in a range of sectors to look at ways they can provide a better service for their disabled customers.

In 2017 we expect government to announce a consultation on consumer and market policy. We’ll be continuing to campaign for markets to work better for disabled people, and for a cross-governmental approach to tackle the range of costs faced by disabled people.

We are also expecting the Government to publish their second independent review into Personal Independence Payments (PIP) which will include recommendations for reform, particularly around the assessment process. We want to see the assessment for PIP more accurately capture the range of extra costs disabled people face from higher energy bills to the need for specialised equipment. Given that disabled people spend an average of £550 a month on disability related costs it is vital that the value of PIP is protected.

In 2017 we want to see long-term funding for social care so that all disabled people who need support can get it, reforms announced that will support more disabled people in employment and to halve the disability employment gap and the protection of financial support for disabled people. We will be working closely with disabled people to continue to raise these issues with the Government.

2016 in parliament – Our impact

2016 has been a busy year in politics. We’ve seen the Government make a significant U-turn to stop proposed changes to Personal Independence Payments (PIP), an important consultation announced on the future of health, work and disability, Brexit and increasing pressure on the Government to provide the social care system with the funds it urgently needs. Scope has focused on protecting the rights of disabled people throughout 2016.

Theresa May used her first speech as Prime Minister to outline her vision for the country. She said she wanted to create a country that worked for everyone and create more opportunity for people, regardless of background. Whilst we welcomed this, much more can be done to help those ‘just about managing’, especially when recent research has uncovered that nearly half of people in poverty are disabled themselves or live in a household with someone who is disabled. We’ve raised these concerns with Government, and we need to keep hearing from you about what needs to change.

While the world was excited by the Paralympics in Rio our research found that whilst 78% of disabled people, through the Paralympic Games, have a positive impact on attitudes towards disability. Only 19% felt that Britain is a better place to be disabled now, than four years ago.

That’s why we have met with officials at Downing Street to emphasise the importance of making their social justice plans focus on improving the lives of disabled people.

Social Care

Social care has dominated the agenda in recent weeks and has been a big talking point all year. At Scope we’ve been calling for sustainable funding for social care to ensure disabled people have access to suitable care. The lack of additional funding in the Autumn Statement was disappointing and the small increase in council tax for social care won’t last and isn’t a long term solution.

In October we shared our research into the experiences of young disabled people and care ‘Leading My Life My Way’ with Government. This research uncovered that 60 per cent of young adults felt let down by their social care provision and a quarter were either only slightly or not at all involved in decisions about their care.

Many young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to do in their lives.

“I think it [support package] covers my blindness and my hearing impairments and the practical things I need to do, but it doesn’t give me enough time to go out and socialise.” Ricky, 26, South East

Urgently addressing the funding crisis in social care is the first step to delivering this.

Extra Costs

In March, we saw the disability community unite against proposed changes to PIP announced in the Budget. These changes would have left 640,000 people worse off financially. We warned the Government that these changes would just make disabled people’s lives harder and that our helpline heard from many disabled people concerned about the changes. We urged the Chancellor to think again and consider the impact these moves have on the lives of disabled people.

The Government u-turned and said it would not be going with this plan and committed to no further welfare cuts during this parliament.

In October we published the one-year on report of The Extra Costs Commission looking at action taken by businesses, government, regulators and consumers to drive down the £550 financial penalty of being disabled.

Uber and Marks & Spencer were two examples of companies introducing new products and practices to serve their disabled customers better. We would now like to see more businesses recognise the value of their disabled customers and will be focusing on improving service in the energy and insurance industries in the New Year.

Employment

Following our campaign in 2015, the Government committed to halve the disability employment gap and this year we have continued to call on them to introduce reforms to meet this target.

Alongside other charities this year, we have campaigned changes to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) due to come into effect in April 2017.

The Government plans to reduce the level of financial support to disabled people in the Employment and Support Allowance Work Related Activity Group (WRAG). Disabled People in the WRAG have been found unfit for work by the independent Work Capability Assessment. This cut in support of around £30 a week to new claimants would impact nearly half a million people in the WRAG.

We believe this cut will push disabled people further away from the jobs market and make their lives harder rather than helping them overcome existing barriers to employment.

MPs and Peers from across different political parties supported our calls and argued the change must be postponed. Although the Government pushed ahead with this cut, we will continue to campaign against it.

In October the Government published a Green Paper on Work, Health and Disability which set out proposals to reform support for disabled people in and out of work.

We think it is right the Government is consulting on this and welcome some of the proposals, including working more closely with employers, challenging attitudes and halving the disability employment gap. We want to see wholesale reform of the fit for work assessment scheme, employment support to be made voluntary and significant shifts in employer attitudes towards hiring disabled people.

However, we’re concerned that the Government is considering extending requirements to look for jobs and attend employment programmes to people in the support group of ESA.

The consultation is open until February and the Government want to feedback on their proposals. Our latest blog on the Green Paper sets out how you can get involved.

This year the new Prime Minister said, ‘we will make Britain a country that works not for a privileged few, but for every one of us.’ In 2017 we will be looking to ensure that this includes the UK’s 12.9 million disabled people.

Next year we will continue to campaign for the Government to introduce reforms that support disabled people to find and stay in work, the protection of disability benefits and asocial care system supports disabled people to live independently.

 Read more of our policy blogs.

2016: a year in the life of the Scope helpline

In 2016,  the Scope helpline responded to nearly 20,000 requests for information and support by telephone, email and via Scope’s online community and social media networks. We also supplied answers to over one million requests for help and information via our website.

Your top 5 issues in 2016

Apart from wanting to know more about Scope, the top issues people contacted us about were:

  • Benefits and finance
  • Independent living
  • Social care and services
  • Transport
  • Employment

Funding the extra costs of disability

Unsurprisingly, the number one topic you ask about is benefits. To respond to this, we’ve employed an extra benefits and finance specialist  on the team.

To complement the work of our specialist advisors, our partnership with the charity Turn 2 Us offers an online benefits calculator and grants search tool. Since its launch in July 2015, thousands of you have used this free service to improve your finances, completing 8,100 benefits calculations and over 7,200 grants searches.

In 2016 so far, the calculations have identified over £319,000 per week in unclaimed benefits. This can make a massive difference to the lives of disabled people and their families, as this customer explains:

“Thanks to your brilliant advice, I have had some fantastic news. I applied for Attendance Allowance with the form on your website and I have been awarded £55.10 per week which will certainly be a big help to us. Thank you.”

We love it when we hear stories like this. Another customer contacted us following his failed application for Employment Support Allowance (ESA). Our benefits specialist provided supporting information so that he could conduct his entire appeal himself. He went through two tribunals and finally, after spending a winter without heating and using food banks, he eventually won. He received a backdated payment of more than £5,000 as well ongoing ESA payments to support him to live.

Just the job!

Another caller who was out of work applied for a job at a company signed up to the Government’s positive about disability scheme. He met the essential criteria but had received a standard rejection letter so he thought he’d been discriminated against. We spoke to him about how to challenge the decision. The company reviewed his application and admitted a mistake had been made and he did indeed meet all of the essential criteria. They offered him an interview and he got the job!

Our online community

As well as answering calls and emails, Scope helpline continues to play an active role in our ever-growing online community. We are investing more time in answering your questions online because we know that answers to one person’s query can help many others too. For example, one discussion has had over 12,000 unique page views, meaning that many more people are continuing to benefit from our expertise and advice.

New information products

As well as responding to a wide range of enquiries, we have also produced lots of new online information in response to popular demand:

  • Technology in association with Abilitynet
  • Equipment with Which? (coming soon)
  • Independent living, updated by our new specialist in social care.

In 2017, we will continue to trial new ways to deliver information content with pilot videos on PIP assessments, PIP appeals and employing your own PA.

We’ll also be launching a new information product that will help guide people new to disability, like this caller to our helpline:

“After working within the corporate industry for over 20 years, I have recently become disabled and found the past 9-10 months totally life-changing. I’ve called various places and not received the help or level of service I have just been provided. I don’t usually do this but I really want to make a point to applaud the level of service and professionalism your helpline has. I felt as though I have been treated with dignity and pride, and not made to feel uncomfortable talking about my disability. So thank you again.”

Goodbye to Veronica

2016 also saw the retirement of helpline manager Veronica Lynch who has worked on Scope’s national helpline since it launched in 1990. She retired in April after 26 years’ dedicated service and won a national award for staff with a long-term commitment to their cause and who had made a positive impact to people’s lives.

We miss her but, more importantly, so will the people who have asked for her support over the years.

One parent, whose twins have cerebral palsy, said:

“I can honestly say that I don’t think I could have coped had it not been for Veronica and the helpline. They have given me so much time and support through all my difficulties and battles.”

Have a happy Christmas and New Year!

Thank you to everyone who has contacted us in 2016 and may we wish you all a Happy New Year.

For free, independent and impartial information and support on the issues that matter to disabled people and their families, contact Scope helpline on 0808 800 3333 or helpline@scope.org.uk

Please note Scope’s helpline is closed 24 December to 28 December, and between 31 December and 2 January. 

Scope helpline receives no Government support: £12 can help pay for a call to the helpline this Christmas. Please support us if you can.