Category Archives: Inside Scope

How can the next government ensure disabled people have the support to live independently?

We want the next government to deliver Everyday Equality with disabled people. It must put the interests of disabled people at the heart of its agenda, and deliver meaningful change over the next five years to tackle the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

A key part of Everyday Equality is having the right support to live the life of your own choosing. However, there are still a range of barriers that make this difficult for disabled people, from inadequate social care provision, to inaccessible physical environments and digital exclusion.

That’s why we are calling on the next government to ensure disabled people have the support to live independently.

Increasing investment in social care

Social care is an essential public service that supports disabled people to get up, get dressed and get out of the house.

Around a third of social care users in England are working-age disabled people. However, we know that more than half are not receiving the right care to support them to live independently.

Text says, Over half of disabled people using social care can't get the support they need to live independently

This means not enough disabled care users are getting the support they need to live independently, work, volunteer, and live full, meaningful lives.

In order to ensure disabled people are getting the right level of support, it is crucial that the issue of inadequate funding in social care is addressed. Whilst we have seen some recent investment, the funding gap in our social care system is estimated to rise to £2.8 billion by 2020.

That’s why we are calling on the next government to increase investment in social care so that disabled people of all ages are able to access the support they need to live independent lives.

Improving access to everyday services  

Living independently means being to have choice and control over your life, whether as a consumer, whilst travelling, or whilst socialising.

However, we know that disabled people often face barriers in accessing day-to-day markets, services and amenities.

For instance, less than a quarter of disabled people think the accessibility of pubs, restaurants, clubs and shops has improved since 2012. In the digital world, 25 per cent of disabled adults have never used the internet compared to 6 per cent of non-disabled adults, often due to a lack of digital skills or inaccessible websites. This means disabled people are more likely to miss out on the best deals and offers which are commonly found online.

We want the next government to ensure equal access to goods and services for disabled people by increasing compliance with the Equality Act, and tackling the digital divide between disabled people and non-disabled people.

Tell us what living independently means to you  

You can read more about our priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does living independently mean to you? What would getting the right support from social care enable you to do? Email the stories team and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk 

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.

How can the next government improve disabled people’s financial security?

We want the next government to deliver Everyday Equality with disabled people. It must put the interests of disabled people at the heart of its agenda and deliver meaningful change over the next five years to tackle the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

A major barrier to achieving everyday equality is the additional costs disabled people face as a result of their impairment or condition.

That’s why we are calling on the next government to improve disabled people’s financial security.

Life is more expensive if you are disabled

On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. These costs may include expensive items of specialised equipment, higher heating bills, or more costly insurance premiums.

Infographic reads: Life costs more if you're disabled. On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on disability related costs

These costs have a detrimental impact on disabled people’s financial stability. For instance, disabled people have an average of £108,000 fewer savings and assets than non-disabled people, whilst households with a disabled person are more likely to have unsecured debt compared to households without a disabled member.

The financial barrier of extra costs makes it harder for individuals to get into work, access education and training opportunities, and participate fully in their community.

It is vital that the next government tackles the financial penalty experienced by disabled people.

Ensuring disabled people have adequate support to meet extra costs

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) – the successor to Disability Living Allowance (DLA) – plays a key role in helping disabled people meet some of the additional costs of disability.

However, we know that applying for PIP is often a stressful process for disabled people. Our helpline saw a 542 per cent rise in PIP-related calls in the period April 2016 to March 2017 compared to the year previously, many of which were concerning difficulties disabled people and their families were experiencing with the assessment.

The assessment for PIP looks at how a person’s impairment or condition impacts upon their ability to carry out a series of day-to-day activities. We are concerned that this does not always capture the full range of additional costs that disabled people face. This can be seen by the fact that two thirds of individuals are successful when they appeal a decision following their PIP assessment.

That’s why we’re calling for the next government to protect the value of PIP and develop a new assessment for the payment that accurately identifies the range and level of disabled people’s extra costs.

We also know that life is particularly difficult for families where both adults and children face disability related costs.

As such, we want to see PIP and DLA act as a passport to other benefits for families with disabled children, such as free school meals and support with health costs.

Driving down extra costs

Action is also needed to drive down the extra costs that disabled people face in the first place.

Households with a disabled person spend £249 billion a year, the so-called “purple pound”. Yet, disabled people are too often unable to access essential goods and services at an affordable price, making it difficult to capitalise on this spending power.

Many disabled people also encounter poor customer service from businesses, with three quarters having left a shop or business because of a lack of disability awareness.

Two particular sectors where disabled people tell us they struggle as consumers are energy and insurance. For instance, Scope research shows that 29 per cent of disabled people have struggled to pay their energy bills in the past year. In the insurance market, two and a half million disabled people feel they have been overcharged for insurance because of their impairment or condition.

We want the next government to make sure essential markets, such as energy and insurance, have adequate services and support in place to help tackle the problem of additional costs and empower disabled people as consumers.

Tell us what being financially secure means to you

You can read more about our priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does being financially secure mean to you? Email the stories team at Scope and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk.

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.

How mindfulness helped me become more resilient

Milo is Scope’s Film and Media officer and has seen first hand the massive benefits practicing mindfulness can have. In this blog he looks at his own childhood struggles and how he thinks practising mindfulness may have helped him growing up. 

As a child my mind was a noisy place.

Sometimes I was treated badly by other kids because I would cry a lot of the time or would behave in ways they saw as strange. I just never seemed to develop that thick skin or the ability to fit in.

At secondary school I made a conscious decision (in hindsight a very bad decision) to put my sensitivity to rest. I started playing the part of the ‘confident cool kid’. It came as a total shock to me that people believed this facade at first, but they did!

A young boy smiling with the Disney character
A young Milo visits Disneyland Paris

I built up an external identity, patched together out of all the things I wanted to be and all the things I thought other people liked. I thought I was a pretty cool teenager. Fast forward eight years however, and cracks started to appear in this makeshift armor.

As it turned out the eureka solution of my adolescence wasn’t a suit of armor, it was a cage. University and immense social pressure exposed this. I tried various things to remedy my feelings of isolation and anxiety to no avail, and experienced several years in a dark place. It wasn’t until a particularly dark patch that I was given a book on mindfulness.

Building my resilience with mindfulness

It’s is not about doing yoga, going vegan or becoming ‘enlightened’. In fact, it couldn’t be more simple. Anyone can do it, anywhere, anytime – it’s just about directing your whole attention to the present moment.

Focusing on the ‘here and now’ can be an amazingly effective way of combating stress and anxiety. In these agitated states the brain tends to run away with itself, obsessing over the past or worrying about the future. When we devote ourselves to the present, whether it’s eating a tasty meal, feeling the way our limbs move or just sitting and listening to all the sounds around us, we give our brain a break and unload a little bit of stress each time.

It’s a cumulative process and the longer you practise mindfulness, even just a few minutes a day, the stronger your resilience and your ability to navigate stressful situations that might have overwhelmed you before. Don’t get me wrong, stress and anxiety aren’t a huge issue in moderation. Most of us however will experience far more stress than is useful because of the pressures of our lives. Mindfulness won’t teach you to never feel stress, but, by being present moment to moment, we can start to recognize and then unlearn our negative thought patterns.

Me today

Though I’ve now developed ways to increase my resilience, life is still sometimes a struggle. However committed I am to engaging mindfully with the world, I still swim against old habits. But, the regular practise of mindfulness, my safety net, means I have richer relationships with the people around me and I have never felt stronger and more true to who I am.

Knowing the progress I have made within just a few years, I can only begin to imagine how much greater these benefits would be if they had been part of my early education. The younger you are the fewer bad habits you have, to ‘unlearn’, the more wholeheartedly you can embrace mindfulness and the lighter the burden of life.  I know that if I’d started practising mindfulness as a child my resilience would have deep foundations and my self-belief would be indestructible. Instead I’m a bit like someone who learnt to swim as an adult. Sure I can stay afloat, but I’ll never be a mermaid.

Mindful Monsters

So resilience, I’ve worked out, is pretty important. Scope have years of experience supporting disabled people and their families build resilience in their lives. Whether as a parent, at the point of their disabled child’s diagnosis, or as a young disabled person, having the right tools to gain independence. Scope think it’s so important in fact, that resilience is a headline in their new five year strategy.

And that’s why Scope have launched Mindful Monsters, which is a fun, new way for all parents to develop resilience and kindness in their children, whilst supporting disabled people and their families through a monthly donation.

Families receive a set of activity cards to their door each month, giving their children important life skills, while spending quality time together. There are four themes to explore: relaxation, creativity, positivity and concentration. Fun, quick, easy, and as Mindful Monsters is inspired by mindfulness, the activities come with all its brilliant benefits.

I’m really excited about Scope’s Mindful Monsters and how it can help children build resilience into their lives, it’s exactly what a younger me needed!

Find out more at mindfulmonsters.co.uk.

 

We want to show disability discrimination the red card

We’re teaming up with Virgin Media to highlight disability discrimination in football grounds.

New research shows that disabled football fans feel excluded from live games. Eight in ten people who attend football stadiums across the UK say they have experienced some form of discrimination such as abusive language and negative attitudes from other fans and other issues resulting from their disability.

As a result, the majority 62% of disabled fans said these experiences had stopped them from going to a live match again.Text reads: 62% of disabled fans that have experienced discrimination said it stopped them from going to a match again"

To highlight the issue and put disabled fans at the heart of the game, Virgin Media is donating its shirt sponsorship of Southampton FC to Scope for the Saints home match against Manchester United FC next Wednesday (17 May).

This special one-off activity forms part of Virgin Media’s partnership with Scope to help transform the lives of disabled people, and to date, the company has donated £1 million to Scope.

Together with Virgin Media, we’re calling on fans and clubs and governing bodies to help improve the experiences of disabled fans at grounds across the UK and deliver everyday equality for disabled people.

Football is our national game and should bring people together. We know that large numbers of fans want everyday equality and that means an inclusive game where discrimination of any kind isn’t tolerated. Disabled fans shouldn’t feel forced out of the stadium.

Side-lined in the stands

The survey reveals disabled football fans feel unwelcome in the terraces because of the reception they receive from some non-disabled fans.

The findings show that nearly 40% of disabled supporters who go to matches say they have experienced negative attitudes from other fans and 29% said they had been victim of verbal abuse.

Almost two-thirds (62%) of disabled football fans think the football industry needs to do more to prevent abuse and discrimination towards disabled people.Text reads: "62% of disabled fans think that the football industry needs to do more to prevent abuse and discrimination towards disabled people"

This is also backed by a separate poll of non-disabled fans who go to matches, where more than half (52%) think more should be done to prevent discrimination towards disabled people at football matches.

Disabled fans want a better experience

The poll has also found that football clubs could do more to improve the experiences disabled fans have at live games.

Less than half of disabled fans (43%) said their club had staff who are well trained in disabled fans’ needs, while only 42% said their club had a zero-tolerance statement on abuse for example, which may cover the use of negative language. More than a third (38%) of disabled fans who go to matches said a lack of appropriate facilities at other stadiums stop them from going to an away game.

More than half of non-disabled football fans think more should be done to make clubs more accessible for disabled fans.

Gold medal hero backs campaign

The shirt-swap is being backed by Paralympic gold medallist and avid football fan, Richard Whitehead MBE.

Richard will help coach five Southampton supporters for a penalty shoot-out during half time at the match to raise up to £25,000 for Scope. Virgin Media will donate £5,000 to Scope for every goal scored. The penalty takers will have to score past formidable opposition in the shape of Southampton FC’s official mascot Sammy the Saint.

Virgin Media is the UK’s only TV provider to offer all the football on Sky Sports and BT sports in one package.

You can follow all the match day action using the Twitter hashtag #AllTheFootball

Sign up to hear more about Scope campaigns.

Confessions of a mindful mum in training

Mindful Monsters is a new and exciting way to give your little ones important life skills and spend quality time together. 

Each month, you’ll get a pack of seven activity cards inspired by mindfulness. In this blog Nerys talks about the difference Mindful Monsters has made to her children, and the way they react to each other and the world around them. 

My girls sometimes find those big emotions difficult to deal with. My eldest overreacts very quickly and gets herself wound up. This can easily upset my youngest, so I’m left with a difficult situation where they both demand attention. I feel like I’ve tried many things, but nothing seems to do the trick. I was looking for ‘something’ easy, ‘something’ simple, to help build up resilience in my girls. I didn’t know what this ‘something’ looked like. I now know it’s bright, furry and full of monsters.

“Mindful Monsters really works”

Mindful Monsters really works. It gives us that helping hand in those tricky parenting situations, all while spending quality time together. Whether in bitesize form for the busy school week, or longer variations for less time conscious weekends.

And I’ve noticed a real difference in my girls. They somehow seem more aware of their surroundings. They’re certainly more curious of it. They are more in-tune with mine and their dad’s feelings. And they’re kinder to each other. More self-assured. Of course, they still fight (tell me siblings that don’t!) but Mindful Monsters has served as the tool I was searching for. A tool to develop their resilience. Help them deal with those big emotions. And most certainly a welcomed positive distraction that not only diffuses their bickering, but develops important life skills.

As a teacher, I can really see the value in this. It’s setting them up for their future. And as the months roll on, our toolkit just gets larger and larger which the girls love. More fun to pick from!

I love the balancing activity as straight away it requires concentration which usually means they stop talking/bickering! It can easily be mixed with other activities too, like balancing whilst making your best monster face! Always a winner.

An answer to difficult moments

A series of cards with smiling cartoon monsters on themI wanted to find an answer to those more difficult moments as parent, and as well as this, I found a way of experiencing magic in the everyday.

We’ve had a giggle at breakfast, we’ve focused in the car on the way to school, we’ve gotten creative while picking up groceries and we’ve relaxed before bed. Without sounding too cliché, it really has fit into our lives just as well as it fits into my back pocket (or handbag, coat pocket, book bag, car dashboard etc.).

And the fact that my donation is supporting disabled children and their families is just the biggest bonus ever. It’s just a no-brainer for me. Feel good central (sorry, embarrassing mum alert!)

Anyway, on that note, I’ll leave it there and let you look forward to receiving your first pack.

Mindful Monsters is a new and fun way to help parents develop resilience and kindness in their children.

Your family will receive a set of activity cards to your door each month, giving your children important life skills, while you spend quality time together. You’ll explore the four themes of relaxation, creativity, positivity and concentration. Simple, quick, easy to fit into your busy lives, and, as Mindful Monsters is inspired by mindfulness, the activities come with all its brilliant benefits.

Order your first pack on the Mindful Monsters website, and help us continue our work supporting disabled children and their families.

“We have a feeling that our family’s future is bright”

Aslam and Sadia live in London with their four daughters. They struggled to get the support they needed for their daughter Kinza after she was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. She went through many health problems and it was a very stressful time for the family. Aslam and Sadia turned to Scope for support and it turned things around, making them feel less isolated and stronger as a family. In this film and blog, they talk about why support is essential for disabled children to get the best start in life.

As my daughter, Kinza, was growing, we saw that she was not developing like other children. When she was six months old, we took her to a specialist. They told us that some children have a tendency to develop later and to wait until she was 9 months old. We waited but she was still the same so the specialist referred her for some tests and we found out that she had cerebral palsy.

Dealing with the diagnosis

The diagnosis made us feel very depressed. Kinza was our first daughter and we had plans in our mind about what it would be like. We took her to many places and specialists to get their advice. What were the options? Is there anything we can do for her? So many questions. Nobody could make any guarantees. We just had to wait and see. My wife was worried and she still asks me sometimes “What is going to happen?”

As she was getting older, we were finding it difficult to handle. We asked for advice about what you can do for this type of condition. They all spoke about physical things, but no-one talked about her mental development.

As life went on, Kinza started having a lot of health problems. It was a very difficult time for us. We didn’t know what was going to happen next. So many things were going through our mind and we were really upset.

We got in touch with Scope because I was struggling

We were given a number for Scope and a few other organisations. We called everyone. We couldn’t find help from those organisations but we found help from Scope. It was a great experience. We discussed our problems and got some advice and we started to feel better. Before that, we were alone and nobody was helping.

Without Scope’s support, we don’t know what we would have done. We’d be struggling more and maybe getting worse. The emotional support that they have given us has been fantastic. We’re feeling much better compared to previous days and we have a lot more strength now.

Without Scope, we wouldn’t have achieved everything so far for Kinza, which is a lot. She’s in less pain now, she’s concentrating, she makes noises to communicate. She feels happy, she laughs.

A man and woman smile with their disabled daughter who is a wheelchair user

The future is looking bright

Hopefully, we will reach that point where Kinza will be totally independent. At this point, Kinza will be happy and we will be happy. After coming out of these difficult times, we have a feeling that our future, especially for our kids is bright, they will get good education and succeed in life.

The most important thing is that you never lose hope. If you have hope, then you can achieve everything. Don’t be isolated and try and find the support you need.

At Scope, we work to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. There are 13 million disabled people in the UK today and life is still too hard for too many.

Our new strategy has been developed with disabled people and their families and sets out how we want to make this country a better place and drive positive, lasting change.

We’ll support parents of disabled children get the support they need, so that all children can succeed at school and get the education they want. We’ll work to make sure that disabled young people are supported as they move in to adult life, whatever they want to do.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy.

Let’s stop disabled people being labelled “unemployable”

My name is Jodi and I am an Employment Adviser at Scope. It’s my job to support disabled young people into employment.

Right now, disabled people are more than twice as likely to be unemployed than non-disabled people, regardless of the skills, experience and expertise they might have. It’s unjust and unfair. With donations like yours we are working to change that.

A lot of things can stand in the way of a disabled person getting on at work – from difficulty travelling to and from work, to confidence issues or a lack of experience and qualifications – up until now.

Thanks to donations of supporters like you, we can work with young disabled people to find the right job opportunity or apprenticeship, help them with CV writing and interview practice and also support them in their jobs once they’re employed.

It’s rewarding work and I love it. But it can also make me sad and angry.

Misunderstanding and prejudice

All too often, I see misunderstanding, prejudice and even bullying in the workplace and a tendency among employers to think of disabled people only in terms of what they can’t do.

It can be frustrating and demoralising for young people to be overlooked or labelled ‘unemployable’ – to feel like the pathway to greater independence and financial stability is getting narrower and narrower.

For a young person struggling with the whole idea of finding a job, having someone to help them navigate the pathway is really important.

Breaking down barriers

I work with disabled people to understand what unique and valuable skills they have to offer. This may involve a volunteering role to build up confidence and self-esteem. In other instances, something like time keeping skills or the right preparation for an interview can make all the difference.

Employment Advisor talking to a disabled customer
Jodi provides one-to-one support for disabled people looking for work, like Nusrat

For employers, having Scope on hand to provide ongoing support is incredibly useful. By helping them to understand and meet accessibility requirements, we quickly break down barriers.

But for wider change we need to do so much more. That’s why we are also working to influence government policy aimed at closing the disability employment gap, as well as running campaigns to educate the public and address common misconceptions about disabled people and what they can and can’t do.

With your help, we can continue to work with disabled people to ensure they have the same opportunities to find fulfilling work and become more independent – both personally and financially.

Thank you so much for your support, it means a lot to me personally to know you are with us. If you can, please make an extra donation today so we can do even more to support disabled people into work.

Today we launch our new five-year strategy – Everyday equality

Today marks the start of an important journey for Scope as we launch our new five-year strategy – Everyday equality.

We’re setting out a bold vision for how we can reach more people than ever and continue our mission of driving social change to ensure disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else.

That’s because we know that life today is much harder for the 13 million disabled people in this country than it needs to be. Disabled people have told us the challenges they face are changing. So we’re changing to meet those challenges with them.

Our mission

Our mission is to achieve everyday equality with disabled people in Britain.

Everyday equality is about ensuring we all have the same opportunities in life. For us, it’s about ensuring that disabled people aren’t made to feel inferior, aren’t treated unfairly, aren’t overlooked because of their impairment or condition.

It’s about fairness, justice and rights – at home, at school, at work and in our communities.

Disabled people tell us that everyday equality can’t be achieved without a steady income, enough money to pay the bills and cope with life’s unexpected events. For many disabled people – although not all – everyday equality is about having a job.

For others it’s about feeling strong enough to cope with the hard times. It’s about knowing how to get support at times and in ways that are most convenient. It’s about finding people who are in the same boat, not feeling alone or isolated. It’s about being visible, being included and having a voice, going to school, feeling safe, making friends and enjoying life.

Our focus

We will focus our work in the areas disabled people have told us matter most, supporting them to:

  • Get the best start in life
  • Live the life they choose
  • Be financially secure

We will drive social change by influencing policy, attitudes and championing the rights of disabled consumers. We will continue to offer support, information and advice to disabled people and their families. And of course, disabled people will remain at the heart of everything we do. 

We want to campaign with everyone to change policies, laws and attitudes. We want to build a community of disabled people who support each other through life’s big moments and harness the power of digital technology to improve lives.

We’ll also continue to deliver direct services to disabled people and their families. The types of services we deliver will change but everything we do will advance our mission of securing equality for disabled people. We can only deliver this by reaching many more people. That’s why we have an ambition to directly reach more than two million people with our services by 2022.

This will only be possible with your support

Of course, all of this will only be possible with your continuing support. We know there’s a lot still to be done. We won’t stop until Britain is a country where disabled people can reach their potential and live the life they choose.

Visit our website to find out more about our new strategy and how you can get involved

Working with disabled people: it’s so simple to get it right

Today we publish ‘Working for all?’, our new research about experiences of employment support among disabled people with high support needs. Aidan is 27 and works in London. In this blog he talks about his experiences of accessing support and colleagues’ attitudes at work.

Like many people, I get up at 6am each morning and commute to London to do a long day’s work at a job I love and an organisation I’m proud to be a part of. The only difference is that I’m blind, having been born with a genetic condition that affects my retinas. I’ve experienced a lot as a disabled employee: the amazing and the truly awful. I want to share what I’ve learned and explore where in-work support goes wrong and, most importantly, how we can get it right.

Not all employers think flexibly

I have had experiences in work where my disability has been viewed as a problem. The simplest adjustments have been refused, despite many adjustments not being expensive or requiring a lot of effort to implement. I once asked a line manager if I could structure my tasks in a way that would enable me to get the most out of my Access to Work support worker on the days she was in. This was met with the dismissive retort that it wasn’t “a part-time role.”

In another job, it was virtually impossible to get the managers to commit to the highly practical job descriptions that Access to Work require. I was refused simple requests such as using an alternative to PowerPoint or recording meetings. As a consequence, I’d often be working at home until 11pm to catch up and require far more support than would otherwise have been necessary. I was even told that because I had help with minuting, “you don’t look like a leader. You don’t look in control.” The message was always the same: I was presenting them with problems, and that is all they were. It was one way or no way.

I can’t hide my disability and wouldn’t want to, but I’ve developed tricks for subtle positive advocacy. At interviews, I always ask a question about the practical day-to-day work involved with the role. It allows me to slip in that I’m considering whether I’d need to use certain bits of equipment, or seek some support from the Access to Work scheme. I use a question to give them a crash course in case they were hung up on the disability. I believe that, right from the start, disabled employees should have a strong partnership with the employer. We are, after all, experts in our own disabilities. We need to support our managers, who in turn must take into account our needs in order to get the most out of us.

Employers’ mindsets need to change

In my experience, there are many people willing to challenge themselves and learn more about disabled colleagues. In my current organisation, for example, describing slides in meetings and running through proposed events in advance, have all become standard practice.

Colleagues understand that a disabled person is a person first and foremost. Combining their adaptability, my skill in offering solutions, good will and a sense of humour on both sides, we just make it work. Indeed, the fact that I require help sometimes has brought me into contact with colleagues in many different departments and roles. What might be thought of as a weakness is actually an asset for building strong networks, knowledge about other areas of the organisation and relationships that enable us to work better.

I want to see us get to a point where, instead of persuading employers to take a chance on disabled talent, they would say, “Why ever wouldn’t you?” I believe that with disabled people increasingly willing to express themselves and talk about their experiences, more and more employers are going through that game-changing mindset shift. That’s a great thing, but we’ve still got many more battles to fight before we win the war!

Find out more about experiences of employment support amongst disabled people with high support needs. Read our new research report, Working for all?

Say hello to our £4000 jackpot winner, Liz!

Liz was the lucky winner of £4000, in our Christmas 2016 Jackpot Draw. Liz has been giving to Scope since the late 1990s, and started buying raffles in 2003. She tells us how she felt when she found out, and why she supports us by joining in with our raffles.

How did you feel when you found out you had won top prize?

I never thought I would win! My first reaction was that I wanted to give some of the money back to charity. I found out just after Christmas, and it was nice to have all my family there to tell them. Everyone was so surprised and excited!

What are you going to spend your winnings on?

I’m going to give some of the money back to Scope, and some to another charity, where a family friend works. We’re then going to split the rest of the money between my family. My daughter has recently become engaged, so the timing of this win was perfect.

What does Scope mean to you?

Scope seems to be a very worthwhile charity- I’ve been supporting Scope for a number of years. I used to be a teacher and I taught several disabled students, I once went on a trip with one girl who had cerebral palsy and she joined in with everything. I think it’s important for people to not be treated as different, and I think this is something Scope is really passionate about. I always liked to buy raffle tickets to support Scope, but I really never thought I’d win!

Would you like to win the top prize like Liz did? You’ve got to be in it to win it! Join our Spring Jackpot today for a chance to win £4000, whilst supporting our vital work with disabled people and their families.