Category Archives: Inside Scope

Trendsetters Blog by Bradley Roper aged 12

Guest post from Bradley Roper, aged 12.

The day after Kayne and I appeared in the BBC1 programme, Racing with the Hamiltons, I was a bit late for school so my Nan said, “Let’s catch the bus.”

The first Bus Driver wouldn’t let us on and wagged his finger at us. We are used to this and I had discussed my experience of bus drivers’ attitudes with Nic Hamilton on the TV programme the night before.

My Nan stormed away with steam coming out of her ears. Then a bus hooted behind and pulled up beside us. The bus was ‘out of service’ and the Bus Driver called out to us: “Where are you going?”

I said, “To school.”

He said, “OK, I’ll drop you off – I am going to change your opinion of bus drivers.”

Although the bus stop is near the school, he drove right down to literally outside the school gates – he had obviously seen the programme!!

Nic Hamilton documentary

Nic Hamilton and Trendsetters

The Trendsetters team is really excited to report that the filming Bradley and Kayne took part in with Nic Hamilton made it onto the TV!

Last night’s BBC1 documentary, Racing with the Hamiltons: Nic in the driving seat showed Nic visiting Scope offices in London where he met Kayne and Bradley and was interviewed by them. The documentary is very interesting and well worth a viewing, so have a look at it – you can find it on BBC I-Player.

Well done Trendsetters, you made it!

Racing With The Hamiltons: Nic In The Driving Seat

The BBC’s new disability season starts on Tuesday 6 March at 10.35pm withRacing With The Hamiltons: Nic In The Driving Seat.

Becoming a racing car driver isn’t easy for anyone, especially when you have cerebral palsy and your older brother is the world’s youngest F1 winner. In a sweeping one-hour documentary that captures the highs and lows of starting out on the racetrack, Nic hits the competitive Clio Cup to see if he has what it takes to make it as a driver. With his family on the track and brother Lewis on hand for advice, Nic is determined to prove that he can go beyond being disabled to kickstart a career as a driver. But his cerebral palsy and lack of driving experience means that he’s facing tough odds just to finish each race in one piece, let alone do well enough to continue beyond just the one tour. When a high-speed accident threatens to end his career before it’s really begun, it takes every ounce of Nic’s courage to get back in the driving seat. A moving documentary that looks at how one ordinary young man pushes beyond being disabled to take on an extraordinary challenge.

Young disabled people from our Trendsetters project met Nic Hamilton during the making of this documentary, and here’s what happened:

BBC documentary

Increasing numbers of disabled young people have been looking up to Nic Hamilton as a role model, and they were keen to explore this in the programme. They asked Scope if we could arrange for Nic to meet some young disabled people and to film this for the documentary. We thought the Trendsetters would be an ideal group of people to meet Nic so of course we said yes!

It was very short notice but we managed to get Bradley and Kayne to Scope’s head office to meet Nic, and be filmed interviewing him. Jamie Robertson from the Scope campaigns team came along too. Bradley, Kayne and Jamie had some interesting questions for Nic and asked him about his racing career, his adapted car, his experiences of growing up, school and bullying, and his relationship with his brother Lewis Hamilton, the Formula 1 racing driver. We found out that Nic and Lewis play a competitive car racing computer game when they are apart, and that both of them want to win!

Trendsetters project

Nic asked Bradley and Kayne about the Trendsetters project, and they talked about living with cerebral palsy and the attitudes of other people towards them. Nic told the boys that being different isn’t a bad thing, and explained how he deals with any challenges he faces with a positive attitude.

“A wicked day”

The filming took nearly two hours, and we are hoping that some of the footage will get used in the documentary… so look out for Bradley, Kayne and Jamie, they could be famous! Everyone enjoyed the experience, Bradley’s Mum and Kayne’s Dad got to meet Nic and chat to him over lunch and as Kayne’s Dad said afterwards, “What a wicked day!”

Kayne told us that he went go-karting a few months ago, but crashed his go-kart and didn’t want to go again. But after talking to Nic he felt inspired to go back to go-karting and he was getting ready to search the web for places where he could go and get involved.

Thanks to our London Trendsetters and their families for joining us at such short notice, and for proving to be such good interviewers.

Let’s hope we get lots more opportunities like this!

Kilimanjaro: I wanna stand with you on a mountain…

Guest post from Alan Gosschalk, Director of Fundraising

Last autumn while planning Scope’s challenge events, we realised that two departed on the same day – one up Kilimanjaro, the other to Everest Base Camp. We needed a Scope rep on each… step forward the fearless Fundraising Director, aka yours truly, for the former. To be honest, I didn’t really know what I was letting myself in for but others had enjoyed it and many had conquered it, so why not?

It started with a briefing session in October and a trip to the pub in December. Between them, I met half of the group of 20 going on the trip. People seemed nice enough. They were already doing well with the fundraising, arguably as big a challenge as climbing Kili itself, but people are resilient and determined. Toby and Anna raised £1,500 at a band night, Marz £630 by collecting at her town’s train station, Nat raised £46 packing bags at a well-known supermarket in Hendon and Ali did a sponsored run of 250km, the distance from Nairobi to Arusha, and raised £600. I went the easy route, generating £3,000 from eight very generous suppliers and a few friends.

Training was a washout. I did manage a few walks but was ill for three weeks from Christmas day on. I decided to rely on the residual fitness developed from a long distance walk last June! Our leader, Simon, pointed out that only extensive trekking at altitude can prepare you properly for Kili – result! I was no worse off than anyone else.

And so D Day crept up on us until we met nervously at the airport, all polite, maybe a little daunted. The next day, after the first sleepless night of many, we were in another world – hot, excited, eager to get going. And so began the daily ritual of packing and unpacking a variety of bags and rucksacks. Si (not the leader) broke the world record for the number of times a bag can be repacked in a one-hour period.

And then we set off, through lush vegetation, climbing 1,300 metres on day one. Within no time, we were singing, sipping water (vital) and telling jokes (poor). In no time, we became a team – the camaraderie was palpable. We were supported by the most amazing crew who sped by us daily to set up camp, cook our food, provide us with clean water, and even sort our toilets. We were in constant awe at their strength and stamina. Camping was a challenge for most – it was cold and uncomfortable. Food became fuel – though we didn’t want to, we had to eat… porridge, soups, stews – amazing food in the circumstances.

AMS (altitude sickness) affected many of us on day two as we plodded up to 3,900 metres. Diamox, the drug that counters its effects, worked pretty quickly. And so began the daily routine. Shiver through the night, ‘wake’, force down porridge and eggs, up and out in 45 minutes. We walked through amazing landscapes – past lava towers, moonscapes, past huge pineapple-like plants, scrambling up the Barranco wall – the variety was astounding. The one constant was the support that we gave each other. Inevitably people had low moments but they never lasted for long as others noticed and joked, sang, played 20 questions and asked inane questions. Well, do YOU know how long eggshell takes to biodegrade?

But we all noticed that it was getting colder, we were having to walk further and get up earlier each day and the mood became altogether more sombre as we were briefed twice about ‘summit night’. Simon’s view was that there was no point in sugar coating the truth – no one could possibly accuse him of that! We went to bed at 7pm (!) terrified, quaking in our sleeping bags. We were up at 11, cold and nervous. By midnight we were moving, slower than a snail due to the steepness and altitude. We trudged upwards, following a line of lights ahead. I counted every 100 steps, then started again. Trevor started singing along to his iPod – it was Coldplay, “nobody said it was easy, nobody said it would be this hard”. We’d put up with thousands of his jokes, mostly bad ones, but this was nearly the final straw.

There was no respite – when we did stop we always seemed to be in a wind tunnel. It was tough, the toughest thing any of us had ever done in our lives. Yet we persisted, on and on through the dark, until after six hours the sky started to lighten and we knew we weren’t far away. Gradually the sun came up. We got closer and closer to Stella Point until finally, we were there – hugs and tears, Jo cried for England. Then another 45 minutes before we got to Uhuru, the top of the highest free-standing mountain in the world and of Africa at 5,895m, almost 20,000 feet. Inevitably we’d plodded at different speeds and just behind us came Amrit, so determined having had to turn back last year. She had returned to complete the journey and she made it – mind over matter. We were all so very proud of her, the heroine of our trip.

We still had a long way down, three hours of scree then another two hours before a descent of 2,300 metres the next day – equivalent to more than twice the height of Snowdon. Then a celebration dinner, fun awards, too much Kilimanjaro beer and dancing to The Cult with Rik! Amazing.

Then finally back to reality in the UK but we’d all changed and learnt so much. We had made friendships that will last forever and share a unique bond. And we now know that we can achieve (almost) anything we set out to, if we’re determined enough. A life-changing trip in just six days – you can’t ask for much more than that. It’s a journey I implore you to go on.

Ain’t no mountain high enough… 

Alan Gosschalk, Director of Fundraising

Inspired by Alan’s experience? Sign up for one of our Kilimanjaro treks now!

Kilimanjaro trekkers

Cambridgeshire consultation with young people

Young disabled=

Liam is an Orchard Manor representative on the newly founded Cambridgeshire County Council’s (CCC) Transitions Partnership Board. The Board is a group of representatives from health, social care, young people’s services and the voluntary sector whose focus is to enable young people from the age of 14 – 25 to move successfully into the adult world by listening to their opinions and wishes for the future.

A consultation event (YIPPEE) hosted at Papworth Trust recently, was an opportunity for three of the new Orchard Manor representatives to meet up with representatives from different organisations. The day included consultation on the Cambridgeshire County Council’s draft SEN (special educational needs) paper, around the single assessment. The young people also discussed how they would prefer to make choices.

The YIPPEE event enabled the young people to vote on three topics they would like the Transition Board to consider during the upcoming year. These were communication and equipment, better work experience and leisure and transport. These topics greatly affect the lives of the young people at Orchard Manor and their input into these discussions will be invaluable so this is a great opportunity for them.

We look forward to hearing more about the work of the Board in upcoming months and will keep you informed on how the young people at Orchard Manor are influencing these decision makers.

Work experience a booming success in Meldreth

Meldreth work experience

Residents at Orchard Manor are part of a work experience programme set up last year to support the Meldreth Manor School reception. Students from the school are also part of the successful programme.

This experience has proved immensely popular with some young people whilst others have discovered it is not their calling.

Care staff support young people who enjoy the interaction with staff and visitors and have expressed a desire to work at the busy reception. Beth is one of the new receptionists. Besides welcoming visitors in a polite and professional manner and making sure everyone is signed in, Beth ensures the barrier is opened to let visitors onto the site and also promotes the sales of our apple juice (an annual fundraising endeavour). A task list with Makaton signs supports her to perform other administrative tasks, such as filling the photocopier with paper, doing some shredding, sorting out post and giving out messages.

Two young people who moved on from Orchard Manor to our first move on residence in Histon, Cambridge, also work as part of the work experience team and return to do their weekly shifts. This also gives them the opportunity to catch up with old friends.

Visit to Russell’s Farm in Duxford

Orchard Manor farm visit

Orchard Manor‘s skills tutor Tracey Demartino accompanied two groups of young disabled people to Russell’s Farm in Duxford.

The young people who attended the ‘Let Nature Feed Your Senses’ farm visits have learning difficulties (including autism) and are all wheelchair users. Many of the young people also have sensory impairments.

Two groups attended Russell’s Farm on two separate visits. The young people have complex and diverse needs and it was vital to stimulate all of their senses through sight, touch, smell and sound.

Russell’s Farm is an arable farm, and has an area that has been sectioned off specifically to allow for wheelchair users to access the crops – tall crops at wheelchair height such as barley, wheat and sugar beet allowed the groups to touch, feel and smell the crops.

Tracey explained: “The farmers were so thoughtful. Wheelchair access can be a challenge on a farm, but they had thought of everything – even putting down cardboard in areas where the ground was particularly uneven. They were also brilliant at presenting information in a way that made it accessible to each person. I was thrilled the young people were so engaged. They responded really positively to the environment. The farm visits were something that many of the young people had never experienced before and to see them engaged in something so different was great.”

For the young people, and particularly those with a range of impairments, the sensory nature of the visit was essential. As well as touching the barley and wheat straight out of the ground, they felt the grains crushed up, releasing a more concentrated smell. This gave them a multi-sensory experience of the various crops. They also had the opportunity to listen to the sounds of nature, to feel the wind and to benefit from the fresh air. Towards the end of the visit, it began to rain and the group absolutely loved it. Tracey said: “We all found being outside in the rain so funny, we hurried off to a big hangar to take shelter and so we could listen to the sound of the rain hitting the tin roof. A tractor was waiting and we finished our visit listening to the sound of the tractor’s engine, something the group had never heard before.”

The second group had a three-stage visit. As Russell’s Farm is local to Orchard Manor, the host farmer came to visit the young people eight weeks before the farm visit. She brought with her seed potatoes and all the necessary equipment for the group to grow their own potatoes. She talked to the group about how to grow them, what the plants needed to grow and why we might want to grow potatoes. Tracey said: “Everyone was really engaged at that point. Realising that crisps and chips are made from potatoes was very exciting.”

When the group then visited the farm two months later, they took their potato plants with them, and actually harvested them on the farm. They then took them back to Orchard Manor and used them in a cookery session with Tracey, to make potato wedges and potato salad.

Tracey explained: “This three-part visit really supported the group to consider and appreciate the story of food. Having the opportunity to be hands on by growing and harvesting their own potatoes was a really rewarding experience and really helped engage the group.”

Sporting Inspirations Dinner 2011: an evening with cricket legends!

“Still buzzing from a great night thank you @scope everybody should look at what you are achieving and help as much as they can.” Simon Barton on Twitter

Thanks to all the very generous people who attended Sporting Inspirations Dinner at the London Marriott Grosvenor Square and who have raised over £100,000 for our work.

The record-breaking fundraising event was hosted by Scope Patron Alastair Stewart OBE, ITN’s news anchor. He introduced Scope Chair Alice Maynard who explained how the money raised would support our Face 2 Face parent befriending schemes that support 4,000 families of disabled children every year.

£500, she told us, can support one new family to be supported by networks of other parents who have been through similar experiences themselves.

Sarah Kiley was one such mother. Four years ago Sarah discovered that her son Philip had Down syndrome. She found it hard to cope. Friends were awkward and distant. She felt that she couldn’t return to work either physically or emotionally, and her self-esteem suffered as a result. Luckily for her, she found Scope’s Face 2 Face scheme, a network of parents with disabled children who support each other through their common experiences.

She says: “The guilt was replaced by hope. Face 2 Face was a special, very safe place where I could talk.” The experience enabled her “to wear that many hats that the parent of a disabled child must wear: physio, speech therapist, playmate and educator”. By attending courses on speech therapy and signing, Sarah developed the tools she needed to help her son, and Philip started mainstream school in September, something Sarah believes would not have happened without the support of Face 2 Face.

Now Sarah has become a befriender herself and she is passing on what she has learned to two new parents, one of whom, after two years, is about to become a parent befriender herself. This is the virtuous circle that parent befriending creates – £500 can continue to have an effect on future families, too.

Sarah closed by saying that her son Philip wants a cow for Christmas this year, and the Sporting Inspirations Dinner’s special guest, England cricket vice-captain Alastair Cook MBE, who lives on a farm, said he would be happy to oblige!

Despite having a net with England batting coach Graham Gooch at 8 a.m. in Finchley following the dinner, Alastair very graciously agreed to stay out late to be the guest of honour of Jonathan Agnew, BBC’s cricket correspondent and the senior member of the award-winning Test Match Special team, who braved the last train home and provided a running commentary on his Twitter feed.

They discussed Cook’s record-breaking 36 hours of batting in Australia, England’s South African middle order, Geoffrey Boycott, the Mitchell Johnson song, the One-Day Internationals in India… (that’s enough, Ed.)

Former England Test captain Chris Cowdrey had a fine innings as auctioneer, raising nearly £20,000 from eight lots, which included a tour of the ITN studios, a large scale replica of Jenson Button’s Formula One car and a one-week stay in a luxury villa in Barbados!

The silent auction had many fantastic items, including MCC cricket coaching for your school, afternoon tea with Cherie Blair at Brown’s Hotel in Mayfair, a signed photo of the Downton Abbey cast and several amazing holidays and short breaks. It raised just over £20,000 to bring the total for the event to over £100,000 – that’s enough to support 200 families like Sarah’s, a truly life-changing amount.

For further information or to book your tables or tickets for future events, please contact Sue Dorrington, Special Events, Scope on 020 7619 7271 or email her.

Many thanks to Isabel Hudson, the chair of Scope’s Business Development Board and the Sporting Inspirations Event Committee, who helped to organize this fantastic event on her birthday!

Scope celebrates UK Disability History Month

As part of UK Disability History Month, Scope has worked with British Library Disability Voices to include over 200 hours of recorded testimonies by people with cerebral palsy, aged 50 and over, recorded for our Speaking for Ourselves: an Oral History of People with Cerebral Palsy project.

This two-year partnership with the Heritage Lottery Fund trained 16 disabled volunteer interviewers to record the life stories of people living with cerebral palsy, and now these life story interviews are available to listen to online.

Disability Voices contains unique and moving memories from disabled people recalling childhood, family life, education and work experiences. There are insights into their treatment by medical professionals, the daily challenges of the workplace and of the attitudes of wider society, and their involvement in disability organisations and communities.

As well as providing useful learning material, Disability Voices expects to challenge and inspire a wide range of users: to help people relate their own experience to others in similar circumstances, but also engage with those who have little knowledge of the lives of disabled people in our society.

Ann Pridmore was one of the volunteer interviewers on Speaking for Ourselves: “It’s an exciting and valuable project. Why? Because disabled people are not included in social history. As a disabled woman with cerebral palsy this opportunity to record our history is long overdue.”

Physiotherapy at Orchard Manor

Guest post from Gemma Smith, Physiotherapist.

Physio at Orchard Manor

Physiotherapy doesn’t have to be all about pain, repetitive tasks and intense exercise. At Orchard Manor, we create a fun, functional and action-packed environment for our young people to enjoy, whilst continuing to promote physical health and wellbeing. The young adults at Orchard Manor have profound and multiple learning difficulties and disabilities with a wide range of co-existing physical and health requirements. It takes all of my physiotherapy knowledge to ensure person-centred, individual therapy for each resident through a range of exciting and challenging activities.

Orchard Manor is a residential transition care home run by the disability charity Scope for 31 young people with severe physical, sensory and learning difficulties and disabilities. Our overall aim is to promote skills and put in place programmes to enable these individuals to live as independently as possible in later adult life. Placements last 3 years and within this time we provide a vibrant, supportive and challenging timetable of development and therapy sessions. This encourages people to develop existing and new skills that they can retain and continue to use when they move on in the future. Physiotherapy is a key area in the lives of our residents and my role is to ensure each individual has the vital equipment, individual programmes and input to enable our high level of physiotherapy care and to put in the ground work so that this continues within the wider community when our residents move on. Orchard Manor practices a multi-disciplinary method of working and therefore I work within an extensive team of professionals, sharing knowledge and expertise to ensure that each young person is supported to maintain and extend their abilities. Orchard Manor has an onsite Skills Development Centre which delivers sessions in art, drama, music, media, ICT, cookery, occupational therapy, speech and language therapy and physiotherapy. We aim to ensure that an individual’s time at Orchard Manor is full of functional experiences as well as fun and satisfaction.

I take a ‘hands on’ approach to my role and I see each of our residents between 2-4 times per week depending on their level of physical disability and need. I provide physiotherapy intervention within a group setting or on an individual basis depending on the task or activity being provided. Each of our groups are carefully created to combine residents with similar cognitive and communicative skills in order for us to customise activities to suit their level of understanding and ability. I work in many different environments to ensure physiotherapy is a functional and daily aspect of our resident’s lives e.g. I spend lot of time within the residential flats ensuring equipment and physical management programmes are being correctly carried out by support staff. I also support residents in the community whether that is the local public swimming pool, gym or accessing local horse riding facilities. My plan is to combine social integration and physical wellbeing into the day to day lives of the young people.

Physiotherapy sessions at Orchard Manor are always full of laughter, games and opportunity. I work on the trampoline four mornings a week providing Rebound Therapy for all residents. This acts as an ideal platform to complete alternative positioning, stretching programmes and functional tasks such as bridging and rolling. Each individual completes a specific programme working on their level of mobility and physical aims. Some of our residents are able to bounce with support. However some require adaptive equipment to support their physical position and trained staff to assist them in passively moving their limbs in order to complete stretches and activities such as throwing and catching. Every resident works towards personal goals appropriate to their level of cognition and physical ability. This may be through a sensory experience, increased body awareness, independent sitting or rolling, standing or bouncing. Any physical activity completed on the trampoline during Rebound Therapy also enhances the respiratory system, circulatory systems and bladder and bowel function. This therapy is accessible to most of the young people who live at Orchard Manor and is very popular. As I mentioned at the beginning, my aim is to ensure that physiotherapy intervention is not painful or boring but fun and enjoyable.

Another facility we have at Orchard Manor is a hydrotherapy pool. I run hydrotherapy sessions four afternoons a week for residents who are unable to access the local community swimming pools, either due to accessibility or the temperature of these pools. Our pool is specially adapted with excellent changing facilities and a hoisting system straight into the water. I especially enjoy working with our profoundly physically disabled residents in the water as they are able to achieve so much more mobility and function due to the weightlessness this environment provides. I am able to effectively support the residents to achieve certain positions which would not be possible on land. For example, some young people use wheelchairs at all times throughout the day, but they are able to stand and take steps in the water with suitable support from myself and adaptive hydrotherapy equipment. The 34°- 36° temperature in our hydrotherapy pool also allows muscle relaxation and hence further stretching potential for those with contracted limbs. The young people may help actively with their stretching programmes or we may support them passively to achieve as much additional range of movement as possible. Within this controlled, relaxing and sensory water environment, the residents don’t perceive physiotherapy as painful or intense, but pleasurable, comfortable and safe.

Another very important aspect of the young people’s physiotherapy intervention focuses on mobility and physical activity through active exercise. We have a range of adaptive pieces of equipment to support individuals to achieve this. Our focus during the 3 years people are at Orchard Manor, is to ensure that everyone has their own equipment for long term future use. We support individuals and their families to proceed with the funding for these pieces of highly specialised equipment via private funding or applications through the health or social authorities. I work closely with the Occupational Therapist to ensure the equipment is individually assessed so that it is suitable and physically beneficial for the person who will use it. We have very close links to representatives from large equipment companies and they visit Orchard Manor on a regular basis to demonstrate new equipment and maintain and reassess our existing equipment. This means that our residents remain safe, supported and comfortable and benefit from advances as they become available.

Our young people have an array of standing frames, walking frames, side lying boards, tricycles, comfortable seating and sleeping systems all individually adapted for their use. The extensive grounds at Orchard Manor include a private road that orbits the entire site and can safely be used for tricycle riding and walking. This provides a change of scenery and a stimulating environment in which to complete these activities. Mobility for residents comes in a range of different forms depending on the physical needs of each person’s body. We use the most adaptable walking frames to achieve walking/stepping with the most unlikely to mobilise residents. As you can imagine, this creates a satisfying and rewarding personal achievement along with the health and physical benefits gained from moving and being in an upright position.

Postural care is a major aspect of each individual’s physiotherapy regime. Our staff ensure that positive postural positioning, for each young person, is applied 24 hours a day and individual photographic and written programmes are composed by myself for the support staff, families and the residents themselves to follow. Alternative positions are implemented within the day, whether that is in a music session, whilst watching a film, when eating or drinking, or in an individual’s free time. I work with residents and liaise with our care and skills development staff to identify the most beneficial and appropriate positions for each person when using adaptive equipment. Each resident also completes weekly small group physiotherapy sessions that focus on positioning. During this time individuals are supported 1:1 by a member of staff and, following my directions, achieve a suitable position, whether that be in standing, sitting, lying on their back, front or side. When each resident is positioned correctly and comfortably we complete a range of activities such as bowling, puzzles, sensory object manipulation, exercise tape recordings, drawing, looking at books or using table-top games. This again incorporates function, fun and positive positioning for our young people.

Another session we complete weekly within physiotherapy is integrating postural care with passive movements. Each resident is positioned in a relaxed neutral position and supported 1:1 by a member of staff. We complete a full body passive movement stretch routine to assist the young people to maintain their current range of movement and muscle flexibility. I lead this session and my aim is to educate staff so that these activities are completed as part of an individual’s daily stretching routine within the residential flats. With practice, advice, demonstration and observation during these sessions, the confidence and competence of our support staff greatly increases and we ensure each member of staff works with different residents with different physical presentations to enable further progression.

I am committed to the role I play in staff training which greatly benefits the residents. I lead formal training on Postural Care and Passive Movements, indicating the aims, benefits and safety precautions within these topics. I include a practical demonstration of full body passive stretches and a sleep system demonstration. Support staff use sleep systems with residents on a nightly basis, without immediate physiotherapist assistance and so this training is vital to ensure that sleep systems are used effectively and safely. This training has been extremely successful and popular. It has helped support staff to further their knowledge and understanding of these important aspects of care. I also train staff to assist our residents in the hydrotherapy pool so that they can make the most of this facility in the evenings and at weekends.

I have mentioned just some of the activities I complete with the residents at Orchard Manor, however every day is different and we adapt, change and explore alternative ideas all the time to achieve exciting and beneficial results. The young people I support are extremely important to me. Their care, independence and enjoyment are always at the forefront of all my physiotherapy intervention and I strive to ensure that their health, happiness and physical wellbeing is well maintained and monitored. Orchard Manor Transition Service is a fantastic place to work and the attitudes of the staff combined with the facilities and high standard of care ensure that each person’s needs are met and that they are happy, motivated and ready for the challenges the future is sure to bring.