Category Archives: News and politics

Why we need to see changes in support for disabled people in work

Today we are publishing the findings of a poll which asked disabled people about their experiences of looking for work and being in employment. 58 per cent of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their impairment.

Tomorrow new statistics will be published that will unveil the size of the disability employment gap. This is the difference between the employment rate of disabled people and non-disabled people, which has remained at around 30 percentage points for over a decade.

The Green Paper on Work, Health and Disability was launched in October and outlines the Government’s thinking about the future of employment support. The accompanying consultation provides an excellent opportunity to feedback on the document and shape future Government policy but closes at the end of the week.

New findings on disabled people’s experiences in the workplace

We surveyed over 200 working-age disabled adults in employment and uncovered that 58 per cent of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their impairment. To address this, we would like to see Government introduce a new flexible approach towards sick leave and the Equality and Human Rights Commission publish a new code of practice on workplace adjustments.

Text reads: Fifty eight percent of disabled people have felt at risk of losing their job because of their disability
Source: Scope polling of 216 working age disabled adults in employment in England, December 2016

Our research also unearthed how one in five disabled people surveyed (18 per cent) had requested support or an adjustment but their employer didn’t provide them. Employers are legally required to try and make adjustments to support disabled people in the workplace. One in four disabled people (24 per cent) say their current employer does not support them to do their job.

Scope would like to see schemes which support disabled people in work, such as Access to Work, better funded and publicised so that employees and employers are more aware of their benefits.

Workplace bullying or harassment

Text reads: 53 per cent of disabled people have experienced bullying or harassment at work
Source: Scope polling of 216 working age disabled adults in employment in England, December 2016

Our research revealed that 53 per cent of disabled people have experienced bullying or harassment at work, 21 per cent of disabled people had been bullied by colleagues and 27 per cent had experienced bullying from their employer. One in five (21 per cent) go as far as not disclosing their disability to employers, whilst one in eight (13 per cent) of those disabled people we spoke to felt they had been overlooked for a promotion.

Government are rightly focussed on removing barriers to get more disabled people into work, but the barriers that prevent people from progressing and advancing their careers, once in work, must also be addressed. The Green Paper highlights the importance of working closer with employers and changing attitudes towards disability, so it’s important the Government improve conditions for disabled people in the workplace.

Government consultation on disability employment 

Scope want to see the Government deliver on its commitment to halve the disability employment gap and to deliver a strategy that tackles the barriers disabled people face to entering, staying and progressing in work.

The Green Paper is an opportunity for disabled people to share experiences of being in and out of work and feedback on the Government’s plans. At Scope, we think there remains a huge amount of work to be done to tackle the barriers disabled people face entering and staying in work. It’s vital that the whole Government now listens to disabled people’s views on how to do this.

Read more about how you can respond to the Green Paper consultation

The Green Paper doesn’t pay enough attention to the barriers that disabled people face

Having been born deaf, Natasha has always been interested in equality and social justice. She currently works as a photographer as well as an equalities consultant at Disability Wales/Anabledd Cymru. In this guest post Natasha gives her view on the Government’s plans for changing the support disabled people get in and out of work.

The UK Government has published the “Improving Lives: Work Health and Disability” Green Paper. This document highlights the issues of the disability employment gap, access to healthcare and employment support for disabled and people with long term health conditions.

There is much that can be said about the Green Paper, both bad and good.

Taking a medical model approach

The language of the Green Paper is very medical model and highly individualised. The social model of disability says that disability is caused by the way society is organised, whereas the medical model used here, says people are disabled by their impairments or differences.

Natasha smiling for the cameraIt is also a forceful advocate of the “work is good” mantra. They take care to qualify that by saying ‘good’ work, but most disabled people will be aware that the opportunities for good and meaningful work are far fewer for us. It isn’t simply a case of disabled people trying harder, taking pills or going to physio in order to be ‘fit to work’. It often feels that this is the focus of the Green Paper.

This serves to depoliticise disability and that is dangerous for us. We are not disabled by our impairments or health conditions, we are disabled by the external barriers and attitudes in the world around us. That is political. No one individual can change that. It takes all of us together as a political movement to challenge and change those barriers.

What isn’t included in the Green Paper?

Opportunities to work are heavily dependent on many other factors which are barely mentioned in the Green Paper. Do we live in accessible and safe housing? Do we have access to transport to get us to work and back? Are education and skills training opportunities accessible to us? Do we have appropriate support, whether in the form of PAs, social services or appropriate and timely healthcare?

If our most basic needs aren’t being met, the stress of just trying to get by from one day to the next is considerable. How then, are people to cope with the additional stress put on them by a benefits system which isn’t designed to accommodate their needs?

My view is that the Green Paper doesn’t pay enough attention to these extensive but often subtle barriers that disabled people face, whether in work or out of work.

Challenges for disabled people who want to work

For disabled people in work and for those who want to work, there are a range of issues. Do employers understand the importance of reasonable adjustments? Do they value the skills, experience and perspective that disabled people bring to their workforce? Do Jobcentres and Access to Work provide enough support? The answer for many is a clear “no”.

Negative attitudes towards disabled people are a problem, and one that the Government has arguably perpetuated in recent years. A huge culture change is needed to shift the views, aspirations and opportunities focused on disabled people.

The barriers we face go beyond access and attitudes to disabled people. We live in a culture that serves the employer and the profit margin. This is a culture that has created the growth of zero hours contracts; of low paid workers taking multiple jobs just to pay the rent and put food on the table; of a culture that values unhealthy presenteeism and excessive working hours. In short, society values money and not people.

Society values disabled people even less. When discussing disability, I so often find myself saying “if you improve the situation for disabled people, you improve it for everyone else too.” It is a point that too many still fail to understand.

An opportunity to influence change

On a more positive note, the Government is saying “here are some of the issues we’d like to address and we recognise we don’t have all of the answers”. That at least presents disabled people with an opportunity to influence change.

The lived experiences of disabled people are crucial in influencing change. It’s going to take a considerable effort by the Government, the Department for Work and Pensions and others to make good things happen for disabled who want to work. It’s going to take even more effort to create an environment where disabled people can trust the ‘system’ to be there to support and not sanction.

Please take the time to provide feedback or respond directly to the consultation. There are a number of ways you can do this.

To make the world of work better for disabled people, it needs to be better for everyone and there are bigger issues that sit outside of the remit of this Green Paper.

Take part in the Green Paper consultation which closes this Friday 17 February, and tell the Government what you think about the support disabled people get.

Nothing will change until disabled people are included in identifying the barriers they face getting into work

Jane Hatton runs Evenbreak, an award-winning not-for-profit job board run by and for disabled people. It helps inclusive employers who understand the benefits of employing disabled people to access that talent pool. In this guest post, Jane explains some of her concerns about the government’s plans for “Improving Lives” with its latest consultation on disabled people and employment

The Evenbreak logoJane runs Evenbreak lying flat, as her spinal condition makes sitting difficult.

As a disabled woman running an inclusive not-for-profit job board for disabled candidates, I welcome any initiative which reduces disabling barriers in the workplace. The new green paper, “Improving Lives”, should therefore warm the cockles of my heart.

However, I have some grave doubts about some of its suggestions.

Reducing the disability employment gap

The government’s laudable aim is to halve the gap between the number of non-disabled people who are employed (80 per cent) and the number of disabled people who are employed (48 per cent).

However, if we continue with current approaches, reducing the gap from 32 per cent to 16 per cent will take nearly 50 years. Drastic action is required.

The government are right that they need to take action to reduce the disability employment gap. I’m not keen on putting a figure on it, because I believe disabled people should have exactly the same opportunity to be given a job they are capable of doing as a non-disabled person, not just a less-worse chance. There is plenty they could do.

Appropriate work

The green paper talks nauseatingly often about the evidence that shows “appropriate work is good for our health”. As a general principle, whilst remembering that a significant number of people are unable to work or for whom working would be damaging to their health, I can mostly go along with this.

However, the crucial word here is “appropriate”. For many people, their working conditions have contributed to their impairments (e.g. nurses, paramedics and labourers with back injuries, or people working in stressful conditions with mental health issues). My concern is that “appropriate work” will be misinterpreted as “any work being good for everyone”.

The challenge that our candidates face is finding employment which is appropriate for them, with employers who are prepared to be flexible in both their recruitment processes and working patterns.

What changes should the government make?

Any measures to help disabled people into work should only apply to those who are really able to work (as opposed to many of those that Work Capability Assessments have deemed fit for work who clearly aren’t).

Some of our candidates struggle to find the bus fare to attend interviews. Social security needs to reflect the fact that people who are worrying about bedroom tax, benefit caps, sanctions, social care, food banks and homelessness are not in a good position to be looking for jobs.

People who rely on Motability to travel around should be assured of that facility. Someone who is unable to use public transport is unlikely to be able to look for or travel to and from work without a suitable alternative.

Leading by example

The government itself is a huge employer. It should be leading the way in inclusive employment and removing barriers in the workplace. However, in my experience, it is the private sector who are much more willing to, for example, use our specialist disability job board. Very few public sector organisations have used Evenbreak.

The answer to this complex issue is relatively straightforward. If the public sector – all government departments, all NHS trusts and local authorities – were to remove disabling barriers in their organisations and encourage all their supply chains to do the same, there would be a rapid change in workplace culture.

Investing in support

Support to help disabled people into work is already happening successfully in many DPULOs (disabled people’s user-led organisations) up and down the country. Resources could be distributed to increase this valuable provision more widely.

Including disabled people

Most of the problems occur through non-disabled people making and implementing decisions based on what they think disabled people want and need. Nothing much will change until disabled people are included in identifying the barriers and in making decisions about removing them. Until then, “Improving Lives” is unlikely to apply to disabled people.

Would you like to respond to the Government’s plans?

Anyone can give feedback to the Improving Lives Green Paper.

The paper is available in a range of accessible formats, and people can respond online or by post by Friday 17 February.

If you’d like to let the government know what you think about being disabled and finding work read our blog on how to respond to the consultation.

Mental health – “It’s a conversation for everyone”

Abbi was born with a genetic bone disease called osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘OI’ or brittle bones. She also has mental health conditions.

In this blog, she responds to the speech the Prime Minister made at the annual Charity Commission yesterday. The Prime Minister made an announcement of additional support for those in the workplace with mental health issues.

On my ninth birthday, I was given a fluffy, purple, ‘Groovy Chic’ journal. It was one of those lockable ones which came with a set of tiny keys and quickly became one of my most prized possessions. Inside, I kept all my innermost thoughts – lists of my favourite Beanie Babies, ways in which I could become more like my idol, Jacqueline Wilson.

And regular updates on how much I wanted to die.

We need to feel able to talk about mental illness

In her speech at the annual Charity Commission yesterday, Theresa May noted that 50% of adults with mental health problems began to develop their illnesses before the age of 14. If that seems scary, it is. In fact, by the time I was 14, the only thing I detailed in my diary was my food intake and the number of sit-ups I’d done that day. Yet it would be seven more years before I finally received an intensive course of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat my anorexia.

Since the days of my fluffy, purple diary, my mental illnesses have cost the government untold amounts of money in hospital admissions, medications and police call-outs. They have had a tangible effect on my performance at school and university and they continue to cause trouble in both my personal and professional life.

As Mrs May identified yesterday, early intervention is both critical to the recovery of those with mental illness, and of great long-term benefit to the economy. If we want to increase the recognition and treatment of mental illness in children and teenagers, then we urgently need to feel able to talk about mental illness ourselves.

Abbi, a young disabled woman, smiles and sits in her wheelchair behind a table

Mental illness isn’t palatable, but it’s a fact of life

When we talk about talking about mental health, we often make a comparison with how we talk about physical health. Whilst that’s not entirely helpful – our societal and medical treatments of physical illness still have a long way to go – it’s nevertheless often easier to discuss most physical illnesses than it is to discuss most mental ones. I’m happy to publicly disclose that I have both, yet even I regularly blame psychological symptoms on my physical conditions. After all, ‘my arthritis has flared up’ sounds a lot more palatable an excuse than, ‘I’m afraid that if I leave the house, the voices in my head will make me throw myself in front of a bus.’

Mental illness isn’t palatable. It’s rarely an easy fix. But it is a fact of life, and when we make it difficult for people to talk about – when we make employees feel uncomfortable disclosing mental illnesses, or brush off symptoms of self-harm as ‘teenage angst’, or refuse to believe that children might be capable of suicide – then we allow those illnesses to flourish.

Closing her lecture yesterday, Mrs May made an important point – ‘Mental health problems are everyone’s problem.’ Mental illness isn’t just a conversation for doctors’ offices and psychiatric hospitals. It’s a conversation for classrooms, and car rides, and water coolers. It’s a conversation for teachers and parents and friends. It’s a conversation for everyone. Join in.

Read Scope’s response to the Prime Minister’s mental health pledge.

For free information and support about disability, please contact Scope’s helpline at helpline@scope.org.uk.

You can also join Scope’s Online Community where you can share experiences, get disability advice and discuss the disability issues that matter to you.

Our priorities – influencing government in 2017

It already seems that Brexit is set to be the biggest political story of 2017 with the Government expected to trigger Article 50, beginning the formal process of the UK leaving the European Union, by the end of March. We think it is really important that disabled people’s voices are heard as part of this process and vital that progress towards equality made in recent years is not lost.

There will also be plenty of other important moments throughout the year and we will be working hard, with you, to make sure issues which affect disabled people’s lives stay high on the political agenda.

Social Care

Social care was hitting the headlines at the end of 2016, with warnings from the Local Government Association and Care Quality Commission that the system is in crisis. With the Government accepting a long-term solution to care funding needs to be found, social care is likely to remain high on the political agenda in 2017. Some additional funding will enter the system this year through an increase in council tax and from the Better Care Fund, but with a funding gap of £4.6 billion, this won’t provide the long term solution needed to meet rising demand and costs.

Social care is the support disabled people rely on to get up, get dressed, get out, and lead independent lives. Without that support disabled people can become isolated, can’t contribute to society and risk slipping into crisis. That’s why we are campaigning for long-term and adequate funding for care. Over 400,000 working age disabled people rely on social care, and with much of the recent focus on how care affects older people, we will be continuing to raise awareness with decision makers of disabled people as users of social care. 55 per cent of disabled care users tell us the system never supports their independence, so we are campaigning for a care system which supports disabled people to live independently and have choice and control over their care.

Employment

In February the Government’s consultation on disability, health and work will close. We want to see the Government take the opportunity to bring about real reform of the support disabled people receive both in and out of work.

The Government announced in October last year that people with severe conditions will receive continued Employment Support Allowance without needing repeated Work Capability Assessments. This is a welcome change but we want to see the Government go further in 2017 and completely overhaul the Work Capability Assessment so that it identifies the full range of barriers disabled people face to work.

We believe disabled people must be protected from any additional conditions linked to the support they receive. We would campaign against any attempts to impose requirements on disabled people receiving support.

The Government want to hear from disabled people about their experiences of employment support services and at work. Read more about how you can submit evidence to the consultation. Later in the year we are expecting the Government to publish a more detailed plan about how they intend to reform support for disabled people following the consultation, and at Scope we will be pushing for swift action.

Employers also have a key role to play in halving the disability employment gap. 85 per cent of disabled people think employer attitudes haven’t improved over the last four years and more needs to be done to encourage employers to create flexible modern practices. The Government should set out a long-term vision for Disability Confident this year and develop a campaign promoting the business benefits of disability employment.

Despite significant pressure on the Government from MPs from all political parties, the reduction in financial support for new claimants in the Work Related Activity Group of Employment Support Allowance is going ahead in April 2017. We will continue to raise concerns about the harmful impact this will have on disabled people and call on the Government to reserve this decision.

Extra costs

Following the publication of the Extra Costs Commission Progress Review in late 2016, we’ll be continuing to campaign to drive down the extra costs disabled people face and working with businesses in a range of sectors to look at ways they can provide a better service for their disabled customers.

In 2017 we expect government to announce a consultation on consumer and market policy. We’ll be continuing to campaign for markets to work better for disabled people, and for a cross-governmental approach to tackle the range of costs faced by disabled people.

We are also expecting the Government to publish their second independent review into Personal Independence Payments (PIP) which will include recommendations for reform, particularly around the assessment process. We want to see the assessment for PIP more accurately capture the range of extra costs disabled people face from higher energy bills to the need for specialised equipment. Given that disabled people spend an average of £550 a month on disability related costs it is vital that the value of PIP is protected.

In 2017 we want to see long-term funding for social care so that all disabled people who need support can get it, reforms announced that will support more disabled people in employment and to halve the disability employment gap and the protection of financial support for disabled people. We will be working closely with disabled people to continue to raise these issues with the Government.

2016 in parliament – Our impact

2016 has been a busy year in politics. We’ve seen the Government make a significant U-turn to stop proposed changes to Personal Independence Payments (PIP), an important consultation announced on the future of health, work and disability, Brexit and increasing pressure on the Government to provide the social care system with the funds it urgently needs. Scope has focused on protecting the rights of disabled people throughout 2016.

Theresa May used her first speech as Prime Minister to outline her vision for the country. She said she wanted to create a country that worked for everyone and create more opportunity for people, regardless of background. Whilst we welcomed this, much more can be done to help those ‘just about managing’, especially when recent research has uncovered that nearly half of people in poverty are disabled themselves or live in a household with someone who is disabled. We’ve raised these concerns with Government, and we need to keep hearing from you about what needs to change.

While the world was excited by the Paralympics in Rio our research found that whilst 78% of disabled people, through the Paralympic Games, have a positive impact on attitudes towards disability. Only 19% felt that Britain is a better place to be disabled now, than four years ago.

That’s why we have met with officials at Downing Street to emphasise the importance of making their social justice plans focus on improving the lives of disabled people.

Social Care

Social care has dominated the agenda in recent weeks and has been a big talking point all year. At Scope we’ve been calling for sustainable funding for social care to ensure disabled people have access to suitable care. The lack of additional funding in the Autumn Statement was disappointing and the small increase in council tax for social care won’t last and isn’t a long term solution.

In October we shared our research into the experiences of young disabled people and care ‘Leading My Life My Way’ with Government. This research uncovered that 60 per cent of young adults felt let down by their social care provision and a quarter were either only slightly or not at all involved in decisions about their care.

Many young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to do in their lives.

“I think it [support package] covers my blindness and my hearing impairments and the practical things I need to do, but it doesn’t give me enough time to go out and socialise.” Ricky, 26, South East

Urgently addressing the funding crisis in social care is the first step to delivering this.

Extra Costs

In March, we saw the disability community unite against proposed changes to PIP announced in the Budget. These changes would have left 640,000 people worse off financially. We warned the Government that these changes would just make disabled people’s lives harder and that our helpline heard from many disabled people concerned about the changes. We urged the Chancellor to think again and consider the impact these moves have on the lives of disabled people.

The Government u-turned and said it would not be going with this plan and committed to no further welfare cuts during this parliament.

In October we published the one-year on report of The Extra Costs Commission looking at action taken by businesses, government, regulators and consumers to drive down the £550 financial penalty of being disabled.

Uber and Marks & Spencer were two examples of companies introducing new products and practices to serve their disabled customers better. We would now like to see more businesses recognise the value of their disabled customers and will be focusing on improving service in the energy and insurance industries in the New Year.

Employment

Following our campaign in 2015, the Government committed to halve the disability employment gap and this year we have continued to call on them to introduce reforms to meet this target.

Alongside other charities this year, we have campaigned changes to Employment and Support Allowance (ESA) due to come into effect in April 2017.

The Government plans to reduce the level of financial support to disabled people in the Employment and Support Allowance Work Related Activity Group (WRAG). Disabled People in the WRAG have been found unfit for work by the independent Work Capability Assessment. This cut in support of around £30 a week to new claimants would impact nearly half a million people in the WRAG.

We believe this cut will push disabled people further away from the jobs market and make their lives harder rather than helping them overcome existing barriers to employment.

MPs and Peers from across different political parties supported our calls and argued the change must be postponed. Although the Government pushed ahead with this cut, we will continue to campaign against it.

In October the Government published a Green Paper on Work, Health and Disability which set out proposals to reform support for disabled people in and out of work.

We think it is right the Government is consulting on this and welcome some of the proposals, including working more closely with employers, challenging attitudes and halving the disability employment gap. We want to see wholesale reform of the fit for work assessment scheme, employment support to be made voluntary and significant shifts in employer attitudes towards hiring disabled people.

However, we’re concerned that the Government is considering extending requirements to look for jobs and attend employment programmes to people in the support group of ESA.

The consultation is open until February and the Government want to feedback on their proposals. Our latest blog on the Green Paper sets out how you can get involved.

This year the new Prime Minister said, ‘we will make Britain a country that works not for a privileged few, but for every one of us.’ In 2017 we will be looking to ensure that this includes the UK’s 12.9 million disabled people.

Next year we will continue to campaign for the Government to introduce reforms that support disabled people to find and stay in work, the protection of disability benefits and asocial care system supports disabled people to live independently.

 Read more of our policy blogs.

Disability – the untold story behind the UK’s shocking levels of poverty

Last week The Joseph Rowntree Foundation published a report that suggested half of people living in poverty are either themselves disabled or are living with a disabled person in their household.

In this guest post Helen Barnard, Head of Analysis at the Joseph Rowntree Foundation looks the extra costs and challenges disabled people face in Britain today. 

In recent years, there have been many high-profile debates and scandals about disability – flawed work capability assessments, cuts to benefits, the stubbornly large employment gap.  At the same time, concern about poverty has also peaked at various times, notably in relation to the record number of people in working poverty and soul searching about the reasons for the Brexit vote in June.

Two reports this year have laid bare the extent to which disabled people and carers carry the burden of the UK’s high poverty rates.  In the summer we funded the New Policy Institute to write a report examining in depth the links between poverty and disability. This week JRF published our annual monitoring report which set these findings in the context of the overall picture of poverty in the UK over the last decade.

The headline finding is shocking – nearly half of people in poverty are disabled themselves or live in a household with someone who is disabled. That is 3.9 million disabled people and 2.7 million people who live with someone who is disabled. However, the real situation is even worse than this suggests

The disadvantage disabled people face

Disabled people face a triple disadvantage: they are less likely to be in work, they are less likely to have higher qualifications and they are more likely to be low paid, even when they do have good qualifications. Successive governments have focused on employment and skills as the routes out of poverty.  That makes sense for many families – getting into work and then improving your pay is the most reliable way to a better standard of living, although most families need to have at least one full time and one part time worker to escape poverty. But it is not yet working for the 3.8 million workers in poverty (up by a million in the last decade), or for many lone parents and households with young children or disabled members.

The second reason for the greater deprivation faced by disabled people and their families is that they face higher costs than non-disabled people. Scope’s Extra Costs work has highlighted life costs more if you’re disabled – £550 a month more. These costs can range from needing specific equipment or appliances, to having higher heating bills because of reduced mobility.  This means that the same income provides a disabled people with a lower standard of living than it would for a non-disabled person.  There are benefits intended to address this, but the analysis in our reports shows that these are not fully covering the extra costs – meaning that disabled people have to cut back on other essentials. .

Solving poverty

Earlier this year the Joseph Rowntree Foundation published our Strategy to Solve Poverty. This set out a detailed plan to solve poverty across the UK by boosting incomes and reducing costs, delivering and effective benefit system, improving skills, strengthening families, and promoting long-term economic group benefiting everyone. Many disabled people and their families face considerable challenges in achieving these goals – changing this should be at the heart of a drive to end poverty.

The Government is prioritising reducing the disability employment gap. Their Green Paper is a welcome start to this, but it also shows how much further it has to go to put together a concrete plan to ‘transform employment prospects’ for disabled people. In recent months, the Government has signaled its openness to change by ending the requirement for repeated testing of people with severe conditions and no hope of getting better.

However, far more fundamental change is needed. The planned cut to Employment Support Allowance for people placed in the ‘Work Related Activity Group’ should be reversed: people claiming this benefit tend to be out of work for far longer than those claiming Jobseekers’ Allowance and this cut risks tipping them into destitution. The Work Capability Assessment also requires reform, which should fully involve disabled people and incorporate a real world assessment of the type of work people would actually be able to do.

When Prime Minister May entered Downing Street she promised to create a country that works for everyone and to “fight against the burning injustices” of poverty, race, class and health and give people back “control” of their lives.  The Prime Minister will find it difficult to fulfil this pledge without a serious plan to enable nearly four million disabled people and their families to escape poverty and build a decent, secure life for themselves.

Visit Scope’s website to find out why life costs more if you’re disabled.

Tell the Government what you think about the support disabled people get

The Government want to know what you think about their plans for changing the support disabled people get in and out of work. Find out how you can get involved. 

They want feedback on their proposals, and will be accepting views until Friday 17 February 2017. Anyone can respond to the set of questions they are asking. We’ve set out information on how you can respond to the consultation with your views.

First, you might want to read Scope’s blog for more information on what is included in the Green Paper. The Green Paper is available on the Government website in Plain English, Easy Read, braille and BSL.

Why should you respond?

The Government want to hear from you about your experiences of employment support services, experiences at work and how you think they can be improved. This is your chance to tell the Government what you think of their proposals and share your experiences and ideas for how workplaces and employment support can be improved for disabled people.

The questions cover important areas such as how the Jobcentre can provide the right support, what employers need to do as well as the kinds of in-work support that disabled people would like.

What will happen to your response?

The Government will analyse all the responses they get and decide which of the proposals they should continue with. They normally release a document setting out key themes from responses where lots of respondents were in agreement. They then decide on their next steps – for example which proposals to amend and which to no longer continue with – and published a more detailed document about their plans. This more detailed document forms the basis of the new legislation with Government will pass to enact their changes.

Your response, or part of your response, could be made public although it wouldn’t be attributed to you by name.

What to think about when writing your response

  • Include evidence – Try to back up your responses to questions with evidence. Examples from your personal experiences are a valuable form of evidence.
  • Answer what matters to you – Don’t be put off by questions which aren’t relevant. You can respond to as many questions as you want, so choose the parts that matter to you. If you want to mention something not directly covered by one of the questions, it’s fine to add this in or say if you think the Government have missed an important area.
  • Keep it clear – Write as much or as little as you want for each question but try to keep your points clear and explain the background to any specific examples, such as the particular service you were using or trying to access e.g. Access to Work.
  • Suggest ideas – The Government are looking for better ways of providing support so if you have an idea about what would help you or how you would change the system make sure to suggest it.

How to respond

There are a number of ways you can respond to the consultation:

Responding online

The online consultation form is hosted on the Department of Health website. This shows a landing page with a list of options.

The first of these is called “About you” and is mandatory. If you are responding as an individual you should select the ‘questions for individuals’ which will bring up 33 questions. You can choose which questions to respond to.

Fill in the consultation form online.

Responding by email

You can also send an email with your response, with an attached Word Document to workandhealth@dwp.gsi.gov.uk.

Responding by post

You can post your submission to:

The Work, Health and Disability Consultation,
Ground Floor, Caxton House,
6-12 Tothill Street,
London,
SW1H 9NA

If you have any further questions please contact Melanie Wilkes, Policy Adviser on melanie.wilkes@scope.org.uk

What does HIV look like? – World AIDS Day 2016

Steve is 30 and has been living with HIV for over a decade. He works for local government and lives in Hampshire with his partner and their cat. For World AIDS Day 2016 he shares his story. 

What do you think of when you hear ‘HIV’? What does the face you see look like?

For me, I’ll be honest, it was those ‘Red Nose Day’ videos of children crying and adults getting thinner and thinner.

I never imagined that one day it would be my face, but just over ten years ago that is exactly what happened.

Coming out is always tricky, I told my family I was gay when I was 15 (Mum cried). Having to do it all over again at 20 to tell them I was HIV+ was not much easier (Mum cried again), but surprisingly, it was not a great deal harder either.

I’d been dating a guy for a while who had HIV and never told me. I was diagnosed on the 1 August 2006, at around half past four in the afternoon and was surprisingly calm. I remember that after being told, I didn’t panic, or cry. I just sat thoughtfully for a moment then asked; “So, what happens next?”

Living with HIV

Stephen presenting at a conference
Steve presenting at a conference

Since then, for the past ten years, I have lived with HIV and continued to try and face it in the same, relatively calm, way. I have always been open about it, and told my friends, lovers and employers the truth.

They are usually surprised because, in all honesty, I’m not a face people would normally associate with HIV. If I may take a moment to describe myself, I’m 30, relatively slim (though with a fondness for cake), ginger and I work in an office.

It amuses me sometimes, that under the Disability Discrimination Act, something that the HIV positive community and those living with disabilities came together to secure, I am disabled.

With HIV I was considered to be disabled from the moment of diagnosis.

The Disability Discrimination Act is now 21 years old, older than I was when I was diagnosed.

There are thousands like me and HIV is not picky – despite the fact a politician elected to the Northern Irish Assembly didn’t know that heterosexual people could be affected by HIV –  it does, and thousands of them too.

What does HIV look like to you?

My opinion has always been that if I don’t talk about HIV or AIDS, if I try and keep my HIV diagnosis the secret, people will think that there’s something about it that I need to hide.
By accident of birth there isn’t.

I was born in a country where health care is free and the medications you need to keep you alive are given to you. The anti-retro-viral drugs that are now available can control the virus.

This means that if you test positive, as long as you test early and start treatment, you can expect to live as long as someone without HIV and not just live, but have a life.

This World Aids Day, we come together again to remember those who fought against stigma and stood up for equality protection under the law but aren’t with us today, and we say thank you.

Wear your red ribbon with pride.

If you’d like more information or support about HIV and World’s AIDS Day, visit the Terrence Higgins website or the National AIDS Trust website.

 

Autumn Statement 2016: A missed opportunity to invest in social care

During his first Autumn Statement as Chancellor, Phillip Hammond spoke about creating an economy that works for everyone and helping ordinary families.

However, we heard little from the Chancellor today that will help support the UK’s 12.9 million disabled people.

Social care

Despite calls from across the sector and from his own MPs the Chancellor didn’t take the opportunity to invest in the social care system.

Social care is the support disabled people rely on to get up, get dressed, get out, and lead independent lives. However, after years of underfunding the system is under extreme pressure and needs urgent investment.

Without long-term and sustainable funding for the social care system more disabled people are at risk of slipping into crisis without access to the support they need. Nearly a third of young disabled people told us they already aren’t getting the support they need to live independent lives. The Chancellor wants everyone to be able to share in economic growth but without adequate social care many disabled people will be unable to work and contribute to their communities in the way they choose.

Employment

The Chancellor said he was privileged to report on an economy where unemployment is at an 11 year low, however the disability employment gap has remained at around 30 per cent for a decade.

Scope analysis also shows that disabled people are almost three times as likely to fall out of work as non-disabled people. If the Government are going to achieve their manifesto commitment of halving the disability employment gap they need to do much more.

Disabled people need a broad package of support to find and stay in work. This includes challenging negative attitudes, a greater focus on flexible working practices and investment in the Access to Work Scheme.

Despite last week’s vote in the House of Commons calling on the Government to pause changes to Employment Support Allowance for those in the Work Related Activity Group, the Chancellor did not reverse this decision today. Half a million disabled people rely on Employment Support Allowance (ESA) and are already struggling to make ends meet. Reducing their financial support won’t help more disabled people into work and we will continue to campaign against this decision.

Responding to pressure from MPs and charities, the Chancellor did announce changes to the Universal Credit “taper rate”.

This change to the rate at which someone loses their benefit as they increase their hours in work will be a slight improvement for some disabled people.

Extra costs

The Government today announced  further investment in digital infrastructure, including a £1 billion investment in broadband. For disabled people to benefit from the investment the Government must work to close the digital divide. 25 per cent of disabled adults have never used the internet compared to six per cent of non-disabled adults. We need to see targeted investment in digital skills training for disabled people and action to improve web accessibility.

The Chancellor said he wants to make sure the retail energy market is functioning fairly for all consumers. Life costs £550 a month more for disabled people, due to costs such as a higher fuel bills. It is vital that both the Government and energy companies think about how they can support disabled people with their energy costs more effectively and set out details for how they plan to do this.

The extra costs faced by disabled people mean many are just about managing and are the people Theresa May promised to help in her first speech as Prime Minister.

The Government must do more to include the UK’s 12.9 million disabled people in their vision of a country which works for everyone.