Category Archives: National Storytelling Week

Top 5 disability inclusive books – National Storytelling Week

Dan White is the author of the brilliant Department of Ability comic book, featuring a cast of superheroes whose impairments are their greatest superpower.

In this blog Dan runs down his list of the top five books that feature disability.

Disability in literary form is rare. I have searched, read and reviewed as many books as I could find that include it. Here is a list of my champion books. So, buckle up and, as my daughter Emily says to me as her wheelchair passes out of the house, “let’s roll!”

5. ‘Mr Millet’s farm’ by Catherine Lord

I had to include this. Catherine is the great undiscovered children’s author. So far wrongly ignored by mainstream publishers, Mr Millet’s farm is colourful and unique. Catherine writes with complete charm and understands both her subject and the little eyes who read it. It’s the story of Raj,  a wheelchair and the different animals that Front cover of Catherine Lord's book, Mr Millet's farm. It depicts a bear in a wheelchair on a farm.reside on the farm. The moral of the story is that it’s great to be unique and be who you are. The book aims to help raise awareness of disabilities from a young age.

Complete with wonderful, colourful illustrations, Mr Millet’s farm is perfect to read together with your children. It is an utterly beautiful book on acceptance and deserves a wider audience.

4. ‘Synthesis: Weave’ by Deane Saunders-Stowe

Disability Sci-fi? Yes! Science fiction is the most imaginative of all genres. To imagine a world that does not exist takes a special mind. And Front cover for Deane Saunders-Stowe's book, Synthesis Weave. It depicts a wheelchair user climbing up the side of a cliffto integrate disability makes that mind even more incredible. It shows a world in the future where disability and wheelchairs still have issues, but things have moved on. For instance, plasma limbs (spoiler alert), the uses of magic and the dangers of machine ethics give the book massive depth and the fact it has a wheelchair user climbing a mountain on the front cover sold it to me almost instantly!

3. ‘The Christmasaurus’ by Tom Fletcher

Well, I was sold on this because of the Christmas aspect! But the gem of this book is the fact that the main character uses a wheelchair. However, his disability is only broached almost a quarter of the way through and then it is dealt with swiftly and to the point.  Scope gave me this book to review and I consumed it all the way home from London. It was generally laugh out loud funny, the main character William is hilarious and a character in his own Front cover of Tom Fletcher's book, The Christmasaurus. It depicts a young boy riding on the back of a dinosaur surrounded by snowflakes.right.  You feel relaxed around his story and therefore laugh at his wheelchair accidents. You also get a darn good Christmas story to boot, with a dinosaur!

Tom has a talent for writing for kids that also sucks in the adult reader. Never have I felt more comfortable laughing out loud on the packed 5.30 from Waterloo. Diversity? Inclusion? Laughs? Nailed it.

2. ‘The Art of Disability’ by David Proud

David is a good friend of mine and an author to boot, however, that relationship has no bearing on his book being included here. Essentially a guide book for media types, The Art of Disability is a painstakingly sourced and written piece on the power of representation, it’s importance and how inclusion can be achieved in the wider media world. David, a wheelchair user, knows his stuff. His inveFront cover of David Proud's book, The Art of Disability. It shows a wheelchair user on a stage in darkness.stigations into the industry, his tips and his knowledge are evident.

Each chapter is easily digestible and informative for disabled people wanting to break into the industry. David is passionate and his experience, talent and knowledge ooze from the book. Full of quotes and humour this is essential for any disabled talent or any uninformed media executive.

1. ‘The Spiral Cage’ by Al Davison

Easily the winner, a graphic novel of such diverse beauty and power. I have re-read it constantly and it has had a huge impact on my work. Al the author gives you his life of being born with Spina Bifida from birth to present day in a series of incredible, stark, beautiful black and white images. The variant styles and text absorb you totally. Imagery is paramount and here Al uses many styles to illustrate his life from an era where being born differently meant different attitudes.

We see his formative years, his doctors, bullies, love and dreams being played in powerful, dedicated art. It is unashamedly rFront cover of Al Davison's book, The Spiral Cage. It depicts an abstract pattern with the close up of a face.aw both in language and style, but it is essential to read.  Sadly, out of print, but with a sequel in the works and a reprint hopeful, Al’s book needs to have a resurgence, especially today when it is more relevant than ever. The Spiral Cage is unlike any book on disability and that is what stands it out from anything else. It is so unique that people who buy comics for entertainment need to purchase this, as it will tell them something about life.

We ran a Twitter poll which showed that 3 in 4 people want to see more inclusion of disability in literature

So, for National Storytelling Week, we’re working on this. We’ll be asking for better representation of disability in literature, as well as celebrating some great work that we want to see more of.

To find out more about stories at Scope, head to our Stories Hub and please get involved with our activities for National Storytelling Week.

For National Storytelling Week – help us champion books that feature disability

Here at Scope, stories are central to everything we do. For National Storytelling Week we’re taking the opportunity to celebrate authentic stories and calling on publishers and authors to improve the representation of disability in literature. Read on to find out about all our activities so far and what we plan to do next.

Why tell stories?

Great stories have the power to connect us, to raise awareness, to make people feel and act. They’re at the heart of everything we do at Scope and they have a huge role to play in achieving social change. Few people are moved by statistics or facts, but when you hear someone’s personal story it can have a powerful impact.

Stories tell us things we didn’t know before; they show us other ways of living, other experiences, other views on the world. They can also make us feel less alone by showing us people like us and stories like ours – happy ending or not.

Telling authentic stories

At Scope, every story is told by the storyteller themselves – we’re just the ‘caretakers’, if you like. Although we interview people about their experiences, the stories we share are always in first person and completely in the storyteller’s own words. And they always have the final say – we never interview and run! We hope this builds trust and shows just how much we value them.

We work with storytellers to share their stories in lots of different ways. This could be anything from a policy report – using real experiences to bring our influencing to life, at events, in fundraising materials, in films and, very often, on Scope’s blog.

We’re really proud of the way we tell stories at Scope. Putting storytellers in charge means we only ever tell authentic stories. We give people a platform to share their diverse experiences and show a more accurate picture of disability. Often, opportunities for people to share their stories are lacking – disability isn’t a huge focus in the media and when it is, it’s often the negative side that you see. We want to make sure that people can tell the story that they want to tell.

Which brings us on to National Storytelling Week.

Dan, an author holding up his comic book, poses with his daughter Emily who uses a wheelchair
Dan and Emily White – creators of Department of Ability

People want to see better representation of disability in literature

In the stories team we’re privileged to hear about a range of experiences in our day to day work. Unfortunately, for most people, their chance to read stories about disability are limited. If you think back to the books you enjoyed as a child, or even as an adult, you’d be hard pushed to find many featuring a disabled person. As a result, lots of people either don’t know much about disability or they only know the limited (sometimes misleading) view that they’re presented with.

This contributes to poor attitudes and stereotypes which can affect disabled people’s lives in number of ways. Another downside is that disabled people don’t get to read about stories and characters they can relate to.

We ran a Twitter poll which showed that 3 in 4 people want to see more inclusion of disability in literature

So, for National Storytelling Week, we ran lots of activities to campaign for better representation of disability in literature, and celebrated some great work that we want to see more of. 

We ran a comic book workshop with Dan White, creator of Department of Ability. Dan was inspired to create the comic book when his 11-year-old daughter Emily wondered why there were no wheelchair users like her on TV. Dan then set out to create a comic book where Emily would lead a group of superheroes whose impairments, far from holding them back, are actually their superpowers. To watch a film about the comic book workshop, head to our YouTube channel.

Following the workshop, we posted each superhero creation on Facebook and ran  a competition – with the winner getting to see their superhero turned into a guest in the next Department of Ability comic book. Here’s a short film of the winner, Daisy, explaining her superhero design.

We also partnered with the Huffington Post to share a blog each day from different storytellers. Incase you missed some of the content you can catch up here:

“Books Hold A Special Place In My Heart – I Just Wish They’d Have A Place For Me” – Heather’s blog

“The World Needs More Disabled Superheroes” – Dan and Emily’s vlog

“I Don’t Want To Read Books That Treat Disability As A Tragedy” – Anne’s blog

“It’s Immensely Important For Disabled People To See Positive Portrayals Of Themselves In Literature” – Asim’s blog

“Hey JK, Why Wasn’t Harry Potter Disabled?” – Phil’s blog

Following that, we partnered with Books on the Underground to do a ‘book drop’ where we hid 30 copies of Quentin Blake’s ‘The Five of Us’ around accessible tube stations. We had lots of engagement on our social media channels and our campaign was featured on Books on the Underground and on Quentin Blake’s website which was an amazing way to share our message with new audiences.

Our next step is to reach out to publishers and authors to ask them to improve their representation of disability in future books. We will keep you updated once we hear more. – so stay tuned!

To find out more about stories at Scope, head to our Stories Hub and please get involved.