Category Archives: Real life stories

I’m an endurance athlete. With one leg. #100days100stories

We first published Chris’s story in 2013, and we’re sharing it again as part of Scope’s 100 days, 100 stories campaign. Four years after an awful motorbike accident, Chris Arthey took part in his first marathon as an amputee. 

Chris taking part in Run to the Beat 2012Hi, my name is Chris Arthey and I’m an endurance athlete. With one leg.

In 2008 my wife Denise and I both lost our left legs in a road accident. With lots of encouragement and modern technology we’ve been able to get mobile again.

Running was, and is once more, a big part of my life. In 2012 I completed my tenth full marathon. It was my first as an amputee. In this ‘revised configuration’ I’ve also competed in five triathlons and four half-marathons; in one of those I managed an age-group (55+) second place against able-bodied runners, which surprised a few people – me included!

My daughter Miriam was there to cheer me on in the 2012 marathon, and decided that she wanted to run a half-marathon herself. Because I’m a proud Dad I promised that wherever I was in the world I would fly home to London and we would run it together. So we signed up to raise funds for Scope in Run to the Beat and I travelled back from Texas for the event. We had a blast as a Dad-daughter team.

Chris and Miriam at the finishWe wanted to support Scope because of the outstanding work they do for disabled people. When you have a disability it’s very easy to get downhearted and frustrated, but support and resources can transform this.

Denise and I have been very fortunate to survive and put our lives back together. Take a look at our short biographical video. It’s good to be able to encourage others in the way that we have been encouraged. And to be able to build more family memories with Miriam and our two sons. Every day is a gift.

If you’ve been inspired by Chris and Denise’s story to take part in an event for Scope, take a look at what we have to offer on our website.

Find out more about 100 days, 100 stories and how you can get involved

Are you limited by your challenges or are you challenging your limits?

When Team Scope member Mike Jones contacted our events team and told us he is taking part in the Ironman Sweden at Kalmar in August for Scope, we were blown away by his determination. Over the last two years he has attempted Ironman Wales but has been unsuccessful – any competitor will tell you that the exhausting event will bring out your weaknesses and for Mike it did just that. 

After enduring foot pain throughout the event, and following discussions with his GP, Mike was referred to a Neuromuscular Consultant who confirmed a long-standing problem that has been masked since child-hood, only materialising in his early 50’s. Mike has kept his own blog over the past few months as he trains for the event whilst searching for a firm diagnosis of his condition – he has recently had tests for Cerebral Palsy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease – but here is an extract from his most recent post as he reflects on his latest endurance events.

From LLanelli to Eton, Nottingham to Port Talbot

I think my theme for the last few weeks must be “Another Town, Another Train(ing) race”. This has seen me travel from Llanelli to Eton, Nottingham to Port Talbot to take part in three endurance events in 13 days, some would say “burning my bridges” but it was something I needed to do. The first of the three was at Eton Dorney, this was for the Human Race Open Water Swim Series, the 10K swim. Looking back I was so glad that my open water training had started two months ago in North Dock, as even I would admit on the day it was cold.

Mike Jones

A six day turn around and it was off to Nottingham for the inaugural Outlaw Half, a Middle Distance Tri based in and around the National Watersports Centre at Holme Pierrepont. There were a few areas of my preparations that I wished to try out ready for Kalmar. So time was not a goal for the day, completion yes. The swim, which was a simple loop, went without a hitch. The bike leg went as expected and again the plan was to pace myself and not get carried away with speed / time if I was feeling good. The course was good, not flat but with only one part that could be classed as a hill. So on to the half marathon, well what can I say –  it started off well! However after about four miles the problems with pain in my feet returned so it was in to the familiar survival mode to ensure completion, which has been the normal now for a few events. This continuous stopping was (is) causing problems with me getting into any sort of rhythm. The positive is that I now know something about the medical condition that is causing this problem, so all I need to work out is a plan of action for future events.

A potential solution

One consideration is to change the way in which I tie up my laces, at present the use of elastic laces with my Pes Cavus feels that I am wearing an elastic band around my feet so not getting any relief. It was due to the number of times I was taking my shoes off to rub my feet that this style of laces where introduced, so going to replace with normal laces using a non-traditional method to lace up. Also what I am now considering is instead of pushing on until the foot pain becomes a problem is to build into my run plan stops to self-massage my feet before it gets to the unbearable pain level, this may mean a short stop at regular intervals no matter how I am feeling.

The Future

At present I am still confused over the results of the medical tests over the last few months, as all I am getting is the observations from these tests. What is confusing me is there is no definitive condition being diagnosed other than a “Neuromuscular Condition” which is long-standing – this term is so general it seems someone is afraid to put a tag on the condition. So the saga of “Atrophy of the Thoracic Spinal Cord” along with “Upper Motor Neurone” signs goes on and on and on. The wait for further appointments continues and it feels at present a race against time for me to plan for the future, but as the mantra goes “you’re never a loser until you quit trying”, and guess what my plan is. It is at this point I start wondering what and where the months will take me – I have a dream.

With little over 4 weeks to go Mike is clearly determined to take part in the event and give it all he can, firmly following the Ironman’s mantra “Anything is Possible.” We wish him all the best as he is also fundraising and running for Scope in the Great North Run this September.

If you’ve been tempted to take part in a triathlon or endurance event then make sure you check out what we have to offer.