Tag Archives: challenge

A challenge that reminds us what equality is really all about

Because of her particular impairments, cycling was not an activity Emma had ever considered, until her “super-sporty” colleague and friend Paula proposed that they should ride together in their firm’s annual networking cycling event. In this blog they talk about preparing for the event and their experiences of the day.

Do you fancy coming on a bike ride – I’ll pedal!?

Paula: I enjoy being active.   I am curious to test my limits. I am not a great athlete by any stretch of the imagination – far from it. I do however wholeheartedly buy into the mind-set that anything is possible with committed training.  Over the years, I have cycled London 2 Paris in 24 hours, completed multiple Ironman Triathlons and taken part in Race Around Ireland.

The other great love of my life is friendship. I cherish my friends.  I find their company restorative, life-affirming and joyful.  Emma is my friend and my colleague. When this year’s Leigh Day (the law firm I work for) cycle ride was announced I saw an opportunity to invite my colleague Emma into what I assumed was an unexplored part of the world for her – and because I enjoy cycling so much I just assumed she would too!

I  searched the internet for adapted bikes and was heartened to see so many different varieties. It was clear to me that the means were available – all I had to do next was check whether the appetite was there. Interestingly this presented me with the most significant challenge: how to ask Emma if she fancied joining me on the ride. It sounds so daft now to read that but it is true. I had no idea if my idea would be well received, or come across as insensitive, neither  did I know if  my research into adapted bikes would be seen as patronising. The last thing I wanted to do was cause offence.

Emma wrote an excellent blog about disability and awkward conversations.  So reassured with what I knew Emma thought about starting the conversation, I decided to park my discomfort and simply asked “Do you fancy coming on a bike ride – I will pedal!?”

Paula and Emma on the bike from behind, with other cyclists on the route
Paula and Emma on a trike with cyclists on the road around them

Overcoming challenges

Emma: It actually took a while for me to take the idea seriously! The first challenge was practical – how to find a suitable bike. Leigh Day put us in touch with Wheels for Wellbeing, a fantastic charity which works to remove barriers to cycling for disabled people. On our visit to try out the bikes, the link between wheels and wellbeing was very apparent on the faces of the people riding around the hall. There were people with a variety of imapirments and on a variety of bikes. We opted for a side-by-side tricycle (think Two Fat Ladies, but without the motor). For me this had the advantage of proper seats, so no saddle to feel precarious on, and a design that allowed for only one person to pedal.

The second hurdle – increasingly challenging as the day approached – was to sit with my fear of the ride and not chicken out. A corollary of being disabled is that you have to consciously build whatever measure of independence you can achieve, constructing your comfort zone almost brick by brick. So the prospect of abandoning the freedom and safety of (in this case) my car to effectively get on someone else’s bike was daunting. This mostly manifested itself as fear of accident and catastrophic injury, not because I had any doubts about Paula’s skill as a cyclist (she recently cycle-raced round the entire coast of Ireland!) but because we would be at the mercy of other road users without any protective shell. And more fundamentally, as a passenger, I would not be in control.

Paula and Emma mid race on their adapted bike
Paula and Emma mid race on their adapted trike

I look back on it as a day like no other

The day of the ride was blessed by sunny skies and a refreshing breeze. We were joined by our friend and fellow employment lawyer Tom Brown, who took turns with Paula on the 55kg trike. As the rest of the cyclists took off on their longer routes, we turned off onto our tailor-made route, only to discover later that we had done the whole thing backwards. The beauty of the Warwickshire landscape was a revelation, as was the universally kind reaction of all the people we encountered during the ride including all the drivers that got stuck behind us (this has made me reflect on my own habitual impatience behind the wheel!).

Now, after the event and still in one piece, I look back on it as a day like no other – a day of adventure, laughter, camaraderie and experiencing the countryside in a new way (in a car you are never really ‘in’ nature). Most of all, it gave me a new sense of what real inclusion means. Because for me, the best thing about the day was that despite the lengths to which all the people involved had to go to make it possible – from sourcing the bike, planning our route, exerting unfamiliar muscle-groups, heaving the bike over turnstiles and foregoing participation in the main ride – I never felt that they were doing it to be nice to me. While my physical limitations framed the practicalities of the day, my disability didn’t feel anything more than incidental; I was encouraged and facilitated to join the event not as a disabled person but as Emma, and for me that is priceless.

As we return to our day job of representing people facing discrimination and other forms of mistreatment, we both feel that we will often return to the experience of that ride as a kind of touchstone of what equality is really all about.

Take a look at other accessible events like the Superhero triathlon and Parallel London.

Or you can tell us your story.

Why we’re taking on the London Marathon for Scope

Vicky, Louise and Nina are running the London Marathon for Scope – “a charity close to our family’s heart”. In this blog, Vicky, her sister Mell and her nephew Moss, all talk about why raising money for Scope means so much to them, and why they are excited to take on this challenge! 

“My little sisters have decided to run the London marathon!”

They are raising money for Scope – a charity close to our family’s heart.

My eldest son, Moss, has cerebral palsy. Thanks to Scope’s support, and against the odds (prognosis was that he would never walk), he took his first unaided steps when he was almost four. To hold your child in your arms and be told that life would not be the same for him as it was for his peers was the hardest moment in my life. Scope gave us hope.

To be able to walk into school on his first day and be able to stand up in a bar and look at people in the eye when he was older – that was my goal. My son is now more independent than any other lad of his age I know. With the use of sticks he walked into his first day at school and he walks into bars on his feet often! To say I am proud of him wouldn’t even ‘cut the mustard’ (if that’s a real saying?)

This, I know was down to the support of Scope at the beginning of our journey. I am mega proud of my little sisters for doing this. I hope Scope’s support for parents continues as I honestly don’t know what we would have done without them.

“I’m so happy that my aunts are running for Scope”

Scope had a huge impact on my life. If it wasn’t for Scope and the encouragement from my mum I wouldn’t be able to walk unaided now. When I was a kid I was told I would be in a wheelchair for the rest of my life but that’s not the case and that’s down to Scope and my mum.

I’m so proud and happy  that my aunts, Vicky and Louise, are running for Scope. I didn’t realise they knew so much about how Scope helped me when I was growing up, so it’s great they are raising money for Scope. I work at Scope now so I really appreciate where the fundraising goes and how important it is.

I really hope to be there to support them on race day. My dissertation is due though so I don’t know if I can make it, but fingers crossed I can be!

Head and shoulders shot of Vicky and Louise smiling with a field in the background

“I’m really looking forward to marathon day”

I started running last February as I wanted to get fit after having my two children. I started the ‘Couch to 5k’ on my phone. This developed into entering 10k races and a half marathon with my younger sister Louise. Then we decided we wanted a challenge as I was turning 40 this year and we entered the London marathon.

Running for Scope was a natural choice for us because our nephew Moss has cerebral palsy. Without being supported by Scope we really believe he would possibly be in a wheelchair, rather than having the strength and determination to walk with his crutches. Scope also offered my older sister Mell the support she needed when Moss was growing. We met other families who benefited from Scope’s service too and have family friends who have also greatly appreciated the service Scope provides.

I’ve loved training for the marathon with my sister and our friend Nina has been a huge part of it too. It’s been challenging and tiring at times but we have all pulled each other along. When my legs are stiff and tired at the end of a run I think of my nephew and this makes me more determined and motivated to carry on and more proud of him. He is one totally amazing person.

I’m really looking forward to marathon day and running for Scope. Although I’m feeling a little overwhelmed about how many people are going to be there! We really feel that Scope are an amazing charity and we’ve all been working hard to fundraise so that they can continue the great work they do.

Want to help Vicky, Louise and Nina reach their goal? Make a donation on their fundraising page.

If you fancy taking on a challenge, sign up for 2018 or check out some of our other events!

“It’s nice knowing my hard work will make a difference” – Caroline takes on the Great South Run

Caroline is doing the Great South Run for Scope in honour of her friend, Vicky, who lost her leg in the Alton Towers Smiler crash.

For this blog, she chatted to us about her reasons for doing it, her journey so far and her determination despite her own injuries.

My friend Vicky was involved in the awful Alton Towers Smiler Crash where she lost her leg. She has had an incredibly tough time adjusting to her new life but has shown outstanding courage and bravery. She has overcome so many barriers and inspired thousands of people.

Despite her own heartbreak Vicky has helped me so much. Her courage has given me courage.

Vicky has sadly faced criticism and trolling online, which does get to her. I want to show her and other disabled people who have to deal with prejudice just how much support they have. It was after having a chat with one of my close friends, that I decided I wanted to do more for charity and for Vicky.

Why I’m supporting Scope

I chose to support Scope because they do such incredible work supporting disabled people and their families. They also campaign for equal rights which I think is amazing. I work as a teaching assistant, working with disabled students at a college in Cornwall. It’s an incredible job but sadly I see the prejudice they face every day, so the work that Scope does is very close to my heart.

caroline-2You’ve got to believe in yourself

Running or walking 10 miles doesn’t come naturally to me, but I know I can do it if I work at it. With help from my friends I have done lots of training for the run.

I have foot injuries so to run it would be very difficult. walking will be tough enough but I am determined to jog some too. I know that I can make it. You’ve just got to believe in your own abilities.

I organised a big fundraising event in my local pub

Tyacks Hotel have been so supportive and cannot thank them enough for all their help. I got so many incredible donations from so many local and national companies.

With all the amazing support from my family and friends it was a brilliant night and we raised £471 in just 3 hours. I was so pleased that I could do this for Scope and Vicky.

Some people didn’t think I’d be able to get great prizes or thought that it wouldn’t raise much. But I emailed a lot of companies, put myself out there, and got so many incredible prizes. The determination to help my friend was all I needed.

It’s nice knowing my hard work will make a difference

I get to help amazing charities and have an opportunity to do something great for myself and others. I feel like my hard work will make a real difference. Knowing it’ll be tough only makes me more determined to do it. I am very excited and just know it will be an incredible day.

My advice to anyone out there looking to take part in an event or raise money is don’t doubt yourself, we can all do things that we never expected.

If you feel inspired by Caroline and want to support Scope by taking part in one of our events, you can read more here. You can also sponsor Caroline here.

T-shirt making day launches 550 Challenge Campaign

Life costs £550 extra a month for disabled people. It is time to get Britain talking about it. In this film Office actress Julie Fernandez launches our 550 Challenge campaign with a t-shirt making day.

If you’re looking for inspiration for your own 550 Challenge check out the gallery to see some of the Challenges that people from across the UK have been coming up with.

Remember to send your Challenge to 550Challenge@scope.org.uk or share it on social media with #550Challenge to see your picture on our gallery.

The 550 Challenge – on your marks, get set, go!

Ride more than 80 miles on a bike. In the pouring English rain. With no breaks.  Sounds exhausting, right?! What could be an even bigger challenge than that?

Yesterday thousands took part in Ride London, cycling the distance from the capital to Surrey and back, to support causes including Scope. It’s a tough challenge but after they’d passed the finish line we asked them to go one step further…

The 550 Challenge

Ride London participants were some of the first people to take part in a new awareness-raising campaign – the 550 Challenge. What’s it all about?

Life costs more if you’re disabled. From speaking to disabled people around the country, we’ve found it costs an extra £550 a month on average. Those extra costs could be anything from transport and taxis to get out and about, to an adapted knife and fork so you can eat.

As you can imagine, being that much out of pocket is having a big impact on people’s lives. This has to change – and it starts with getting the word out.

We want to raise awareness of the £550 extra disabled people are having to pay – that’s the big challenge. To do it we’re asking people all around the country to take a photo or a video of themselves with “550” in it and share it on social media. Together we can get Britain talking.

The tired cyclists at Ride London did a brilliant job of getting the ball rolling! Here are just a few of our favourites:

Two women and a man holding two big 5s and a bike wheel to make "550"

A man holds two big 5s and a bike wheel to make "550"

Man holding two big 5s and a bike wheel in vertical row to make "550" Two women holding two big 5s and a bike wheel to make "550"

A woman and three men hold two big %s and a bike wheel to make "550"

Are you up for the challenge too?

If they can do a great “550” photo after riding all day in the pouring rain, you definitely can too! There are loads of easy ways to take part.  You could:

  • Draw a 550 sign
  • Decorate a cake with 550 icing
  • Set yourself a 5 minutes 50 seconds challenge (or 550 metres or even 550 miles!)
  • Or whatever you like that’s 550 – get creative, get active, get together with friends or colleagues!

Then simply:

  1. Take a photo or video.
  2. Share it on Facebook or Twitter and include www.scope.org.uk/550 and #550challenge
  3. Email it to us campaigns@scope.org.uk

We’re looking forward to seeing what you can do! See more 550 pictures, find out more about the 550 Challenge and our extra costs campaign.