Tag Archives: Children and families

Confessions of a mindful mum in training

Mindful Monsters is a new and exciting way to give your little ones important life skills and spend quality time together. 

Each month, you’ll get a pack of seven activity cards inspired by mindfulness. In this blog Nerys talks about the difference Mindful Monsters has made to her children, and the way they react to each other and the world around them. 

My girls sometimes find those big emotions difficult to deal with. My eldest overreacts very quickly and gets herself wound up. This can easily upset my youngest, so I’m left with a difficult situation where they both demand attention. I feel like I’ve tried many things, but nothing seems to do the trick. I was looking for ‘something’ easy, ‘something’ simple, to help build up resilience in my girls. I didn’t know what this ‘something’ looked like. I now know it’s bright, furry and full of monsters.

“Mindful Monsters really works”

Mindful Monsters really works. It gives us that helping hand in those tricky parenting situations, all while spending quality time together. Whether in bitesize form for the busy school week, or longer variations for less time conscious weekends.

And I’ve noticed a real difference in my girls. They somehow seem more aware of their surroundings. They’re certainly more curious of it. They are more in-tune with mine and their dad’s feelings. And they’re kinder to each other. More self-assured. Of course, they still fight (tell me siblings that don’t!) but Mindful Monsters has served as the tool I was searching for. A tool to develop their resilience. Help them deal with those big emotions. And most certainly a welcomed positive distraction that not only diffuses their bickering, but develops important life skills.

As a teacher, I can really see the value in this. It’s setting them up for their future. And as the months roll on, our toolkit just gets larger and larger which the girls love. More fun to pick from!

I love the balancing activity as straight away it requires concentration which usually means they stop talking/bickering! It can easily be mixed with other activities too, like balancing whilst making your best monster face! Always a winner.

An answer to difficult moments

A series of cards with smiling cartoon monsters on themI wanted to find an answer to those more difficult moments as parent, and as well as this, I found a way of experiencing magic in the everyday.

We’ve had a giggle at breakfast, we’ve focused in the car on the way to school, we’ve gotten creative while picking up groceries and we’ve relaxed before bed. Without sounding too cliché, it really has fit into our lives just as well as it fits into my back pocket (or handbag, coat pocket, book bag, car dashboard etc.).

And the fact that my donation is supporting disabled children and their families is just the biggest bonus ever. It’s just a no-brainer for me. Feel good central (sorry, embarrassing mum alert!)

Anyway, on that note, I’ll leave it there and let you look forward to receiving your first pack.

Mindful Monsters is a new and fun way to help parents develop resilience and kindness in their children.

Your family will receive a set of activity cards to your door each month, giving your children important life skills, while you spend quality time together. You’ll explore the four themes of relaxation, creativity, positivity and concentration. Simple, quick, easy to fit into your busy lives, and, as Mindful Monsters is inspired by mindfulness, the activities come with all its brilliant benefits.

Order your first pack on the Mindful Monsters website, and help us continue our work supporting disabled children and their families.

“Christmas can be one of the most difficult times for families”

Jackie O’Kelly has been a Scope Information and Support worker in the midlands for the last 20 years, supporting thousands of disabled people and families with advice and information. 

Christmas can be an especially hard time for disabled children and their families. Here, Jackie tells us how her invaluable advice made a life-changing difference to Jenny and her son Harry, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy just weeks before Christmas. 

Thousands of families are expected to turn to Scope for support this Christmas. You can help make sure every family who contacts us receives the support they need by donating the Light up Christmas Appeal.

Two years ago a mum called Jenny got in touch with our Scope helpline as her young son Harry had just been diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

Obviously this was a worrying time for Jenny and her family. They had not been given any information to help them understand cerebral palsy, which is hugely complex, or how Harry might be affected in the future.

Jenny had a lot of questions and no idea what help the family might need to support Harry at home and at school, or how to go about getting this.

Jenny was finding it quite hard to explain Harry’s difficulties to other people and make them aware of the help that he needed.

How I worked with the family

I explained to Jenny about Harry’s cerebral palsy in the simplest of terms. I also sent her some information so she could keep re-reading it until she got a better understanding of his difficulties.

I also thought she could show this information to other people if they too were struggling to understand his cerebral palsy, such as teachers at his school and other family members.

We ended up talking about all sorts of other things that might be helpful to Harry, for example information on useful events that were coming up local to her.

Jackie, smiling for the cameraThe difficulties parents face

It is so difficult for parents of children like Harry to get this type of information, especially if their child goes to a mainstream school.

As a result many parents like Jenny end up feeling isolated and unsupported. Often they miss out on vital sources of help and support that could have made their lives and their child’s life so much easier.

If ever I now see something that might be of help to Harry or his family I always try to send it Jenny’s way. As with most other parents their journey is ongoing and different needs and issues will undoubtedly crop up along the way.

My work continues

Because of all of the recent changes to social care that have affected disabled people, I am receiving more and more requests from people who are often quite desperate about their situations.

They simply do not know where to go for help, as many local advice agencies who have been badly hit by the cuts have been closed.

I am currently supporting around 30 disabled people and families, with the numbers increasing all the time.

Christmas for disabled families

Christmas can be one of the most difficult times of year for disabled people and their families.

There is the sheer expense of it all as bills are at their highest. Also a lot of services quite simply shut down over this period, or run services that are so thin on the ground that all but the most urgent of cases can be dealt with.

I have seen this happen year on year and the stress it can create in families is enormous.

Thousands of families are expected to turn to Scope for support this Christmas, which is why we’re asking you to donate to our Light up Christmas appeal. With your help we can be there for every family who contacts us.

“I’m caring because the alternative was unthinkable”

Ann is one of an estimated 25,000 carers over the age of 65 who are bringing up grandchildren or other family members, because their own parents are unable to look after them. Here, she describes the impact this has had on her life.

My story began over 22 years ago when my eldest daughter was in her first year of Art College and had a psychotic episode. She never recovered and, after 22 years of being in hospitals and various hostels, she still suffers from mental ill health. This was a devastating experience for all the family.

17 years ago my daughter had a child – my granddaughter – and I became a double carer. My husband and I were still supporting our daughter and, as she was taken into hospital six days after the birth, we took on the responsibility of the new baby. My granddaughter was put on the ‘at risk register’ at birth as a consequence of my daughter’s mental health condition. She was assigned two social workers, one before the birth and another after the birth.

We were advised by the second social worker to take out a residence order to safeguard the welfare of our grandchild. We were not told it meant there would be no support whatsoever after this, as the child would then be our responsibility. The legal procedure cost us about a £1000 and a lot of emotional heartache, knowing we were taking on a role that should have been our daughter’s. We also felt a lot of pressure from the social worker as the alternative was to take our grandchild into care.

Meanwhile my husband and I were juggling caring for our granddaughter, working, caring for our younger daughter, visiting our eldest daughter in hospital daily and supporting her relationship with her own daughter with as many visits as we could. When my granddaughter was two, my husband of 33 years, left us. He said he wanted a new life which is hardly surprising given the life we had.

The last 22 years have had a huge impact on my life, physically, emotionally and financially. However despite the hardships my granddaughter has just finished secondary school and achieved 10 GSE’s plus a distinction in a BTEC music course. She plays football and was selected to be part of a centre of excellence. She has survived her difficult beginnings and is now thriving with an exciting future ahead of her.

The role of kinship carer

Kinship Care, Family and Friends Care or Connected Carers are all terms used by the social services to describe what I and many thousands of grandparent, siblings, aunts and uncles or even very close family friends are doing on a daily basis. We look after the children because we love them and know that the alternative of putting them into care is unthinkable.

It has been estimated there are about 300,000 children being cared for by other family members because the parents are unable to look after their children for a variety of reasons. The majority of those carers are, like myself, retired and living on pensions.

Once a residence order or a special guardianship order has been awarded, which are issued through the courts, we then take on the parental responsibility and more. Some grandparents are caring for four grandchildren, some have children who are disabled or who have been traumatised by their earlier experiences, and we even have great grandparents caring in their 80’s. It is estimated that around 25,000 family and friends carers are over 65 but this figure is probably greater than the estimation.

We meet the daily needs of the child, we keep them safe, we nurture them, we provide stability and love and give them a sense of still belonging to the family. We coordinate contact between parent and child where appropriate, and this can be a very difficult role especially when we are suffering the pain of knowing our own child has such overwhelming problems.

Statistically, children who are cared for within the family do much better than those in care. They may have experienced the same multiple adversities as children in care, but the benefits of remaining with their family help them overcome those traumas.

Sadly the role of kinship carers is often hidden and unrecognised. It has been estimated that kinship carers save the taxpayer £12 billion a year in care costs (if the children we look after were put into foster care). We campaign constantly for better support and recognition and some of our pleas are heard but there is still a long way to go to secure a better future for our children.

However despite all the problems and difficulties I would not change a thing. It has been a joy and a privilege to bring up my granddaughter and I would do it again a hundred times over.

We are fortunate to have Grandparents Plus on our online community this week, talking about some of the issues Ann has raised here, and answering your questions. Please join us!

Tips for a stress-free Halloween and bonfire night

The nights are drawing in, which means Halloween and Bonfire night are almost upon us. For some disabled children, it can be quite a stressful time of year, so we’ve put together some top tips from our online community.  

Be prepared

Have a calendar, and count down the days to Halloween with your child. If they like knowing as much as possible about everything, it can be really helpful for them to learn lots of facts about Halloween such as where it originated from, and why it is still celebrated today.

Any day can be Halloween!

My daughter gets scared of the costumes at Halloween, so I encourage her to dress up at any time of the year to help her understand about costumes and that dressing up doesn’t change the person underneath the outfit.

Gauge your child’s reactions

Always keep an eye on how your child is handling the situation, whether it’s Halloween or fireworks. Even if you have prepared for every possible scenario, they may still have a difficult time engaging in activities. Pay attention to their cues and if it’s all too much, it may be best to remove them from the situation and go home.

Distract with snacks and games

Familiar toys, games and snacks can provide comfort and distraction from over-stimulating sights, sounds and smells. These favourites can also come in handy if your child gets anxious while waiting for the fireworks to start.

Wheelchair friendly pumpkin

Daisy can’t go out but she loves to answer the door in costume and hand out sweets. Last year we carved a wheelchair symbol into her pumpkin.

Knowing what to expect

Whatever you’re planning this bonfire night, make sure your child knows what to expect. If your child responds to visual cues, try showing them a video of fireworks (with the volume turned down at first). Although it’s important they know what to expect, try not to go overboard. Sometimes too much anticipation can be just as overwhelming.

Lead by example

If you’re calm, your child is more likely to stay calm. If you start getting anxious, they are more likely to pick up on your cues.

Keep your clothes on

Some children with sensory issues may not like the feel of costumes – a lot of them can be quite synthetic and scratchy. Try letting them leave their own clothes on – or pyjamas – underneath.

Wheels of pumpkins

I have seen some great designs on Google. Sadly, I am somewhat lacking in the artistic skills department so I will be keeping it simple by turning the wheels on my daughter’s chair into giant pumpkins!

Keep your distance

View firework displays from a distance. There’s no reason you have to be right up close. Most displays are better viewed from a distance. Stand away from the crowds. If you are having fireworks at home, let your child watch from indoors where it is warm and they can enjoy the display without the loud noises.

Use headphones

A set of headphones can help block out loud noise and reduce the anxiety that people with sensory issues experience around fireworks. You could even play soothing music through them.

Let your child take the lead

Don’t force your child into participating in Halloween. Let them engage with it however they want to and at their own pace. They may never want to take part, and planning a different activity to do on that day and evening could be a much happier and calmer experience for all involved

Alternative mask

If your child doesn’t want to wear a masks try giving them one on a stick that they can hold in front of their face as and when they want to.

Adapt your child’s own clothes

If your child doesn’t like wearing an unfamiliar costume, make one using their own clothes, so they feel more comfortable. For example, take old leggings and a T-shirt and tear them to make a zombie costume.

These tips were all contributed by parents of disabled children. Find more great tips like these, and share your own on Scope’s online community.

5 facts everyone should know about cerebral palsy

Today is World Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day and Scope’s Helpline Manager Veronica Lynch is on our online community now answering your questions. Here are 5 facts about cerebral palsy she has put together, which you may or may not know.

1. Cerebral palsy is not an illness

Cerebral palsy is a condition caused by injury to the immature brain. The injury could be caused by an infection, an accident, lack of oxygen, problems at birth, or, in some cases, it may have a genetic link. However, there may be no obvious cause.

Smiling girl

2. Cerebral palsy can not be cured

Cerebral palsy is permanent. What can change is the effects this brain damage has on individuals. Treatments and therapies can improve muscle tone and practical ability.

Football

3.Cerebral palsy describes the condition

Terms such as ‘spasticity’, ‘diplegia’ and ‘hemiplegia’ refer to how the person’s body is affected. Spasticity means that muscles are very tight and can be painful and spasm. Diplegia means that two limbs (normally the legs) are affected. Hemiplegia means one side of the body is affected.

Children playing Kerplunk

4.Cerebral palsy is primarily physical

Depending on the location and severity of the damage to the brain, some people with cerebral palsy will have learning, cognitive or sensory impairments, but there are also lots of people who have above average intelligence, go to university and are employed in a variety of roles.

Girl in wheelchair

5. People do not die of cerebral palsy

The effects of cerebral palsy on someone’s body may cause further medical issues. For example, if they are profoundly affected and unable to maintain an upright sitting and standing posture, therefore using a wheelchair, they may be putting increased pressure on their heart and lungs. In general, and with the right support, people with cerebral palsy have the same life expectancy as anyone else.

Man in wheelchair at a barIf you would like further information and advice about cerebral palsy, Scope’s Helpline Manager Veronica Lynch is answering your questions on our online community now. Why not drop her a line!

6 steps to encourage healthy eating habits in disabled children

Deborah French is a cookery teacher and activity coordinator for disabled children and their families. She has a son on the autistic spectrum, a daughter with Down’s syndrome and young twins, and is the author of a new cookery book for disabled children.

This blog has now moved to our online community.

Join Deborah on our online community.

“My husband and I had to sleep separately”

We are currently running a sleep appeal. Has your child ever had problems sleeping? Here’s Sarah’s story.

Florence has autism and sensory processing disorder. For five years Florence wouldn’t sleep alone, meaning Sarah and her husband slept in separate beds so one of them could be with her. 

Florence always had sleep problems but they became worse as she grew older. My husband Nick and I had to sleep separately to guarantee some sleep for at least one of us. We had to stay in separate rooms because Nick was getting up at 6am to go to work and didn’t get back home until 8.30pm.

It was important from a family perspective that he at least got sleep on some nights so he could function at work. I could sleep when Florence was in pre-school, then Nick would take over at the weekends or nights when his next day was not so busy. We lived very strange lives.

We tried Florence sleeping in with her sister Isabella, because we thought she was scared to be on her own, but she still wanted us to stay with her until she went to sleep. She’d get off to sleep at 10.30pm and then be up again at 11.30pm. When she woke, she would be wide awake immediately and say she was bored.

Sarah with her husband and two daughters, sitting in a field
Sarah and her family

The toll of no sleep

It was difficult being in separate rooms because Nick is my true love. But part of Flo’s autism is her desire for routine and giving her that routine, at least, helped in some ways. However, because you’re under par having not slept, you have irrational thoughts all the time.

Because Nick and I were not sharing the same bed, I started to feel insecure about our relationship. If we weren’t the couple that we were it could have split us up. Fortunately our relationship is, and always has been, rock solid and it remains so.

Sarah, her husband and two daughters holding hands in a forest
Things started to change for Sarah and her family once she came across Sleep Solutions.

Discovering Sleep Solutions

I heard about Scope’s Sleep Solutions from a friend. I went to a workshop. It was ground-breaking for me, absolutely ground-breaking. Nick and I hadn’t had a night out in four years because we couldn’t get a babysitter that Flo would accept. We thought there was no end to it.

I came away from the Sleep Solutions workshop excited and empowered, and it wasn’t just me. I came home and shared everything I’d learned with Nick and we put it straight to work. The results were incredible.

Family life now

All of our lives have changed completely since this happened in June 2014. Florence sleeps well regularly and we still can’t believe it. I think I have just about caught up on my sleep after five years.

I don’t have bags under my eyes anymore. I have energy again and I feel like I’ve got fun in my life. I can spend time with my kids without being tired all the time. Family life is much better; Isabella can spend time on her own and Florence is much nicer to Isabella because she isn’t so tired all the time.

On last year’s summer holiday Nick and I spent every night of the two weeks in our own bed, with the girls in their room – that had never happened before!

Sarah is the face of our sleep appeal this summer.

Please donate to our sleep appeal so that more families of disabled children can get the support they need. 

Scope’s online community is a year old today!

“Happy Birthday to us … Happy Birthday to us …” We are celebrating the first anniversary of Scope’s online community, and what a year it’s been!

We launched our new community on 3 July 2014, as a place for people connected by disability to find support, share experiences and swap ideas. We wanted it to be a safe, friendly environment, where disabled people, families and professionals could talk. We also hoped it would become a lively forum for discussing topical issues and subjects that were important to disabled people.

We are pleased to say – one year on – it is all that and more! So, let’s take a look at some of our best bits:

From bed-wetting to sex

Emma holding a sign which says - Desperate for a good night's sleep? Ask me anythingWe’ve had several guest experts dropping into the community to answer your questions over the past year. In September, we invited two senior sleep advisors from Scope, who were literally inundated with posts. You can see some of the fantastic tips and advice they had to offer here.

This was closely followed by a Q&A from two bed-wetting advisors from ERIC (Education & Resources for Improving Childhood Continence), which was also very popular.Then we had two “non-expert sexperts” – journalist and broadcaster Mik Scarlet and Emily Yates from Enhance the UK’s Love Lounge, who joined us for a lively Q&A about sex and relationships.

Other popular discussions were hosted by Robert Pearce from Active Nation, who came in to talk about keeping fit, and Kat Dunn from Mind, who answered questions about mental health.People in wheelchairs doing a keep fit class Plus, we had a wonderful team of youth and community workers from Carers Trust hosting a chat about young carers, and a really useful Q&A about employment support for disabled people, led by Tracy Abbott from the Business Disability Forum and our very own pre-employment advisor, Michelle Parkes.

A warm welcome

In addition to our visiting experts, we are fortunate to have a number of regular community advisors, answering your questions in their specific area of expertise. They cover a range of specialisms, from speech and language therapy to assistive technology.

Woman with blonde hair sitting at a desk, looking at her smartphoneOver the past year, we have recruited several new advisors, including Debbie from Scope Helpline, who answers questions on housing and independent living, Richard Lamplough, who is our new employment advisor and  Michelle a Scope pre-employment advisor.

Plus, of course our wonderful community champions, who welcome new members and make them feel at home. Our community champions come from all walks of life – some are parents, some are professionals and some are disabled people. They have all volunteered their time to make sure the community is a safe, supportive place to be.

Let’s have a heated debate!

The community has also played host to some lively discussions in its first year, most notably after Lucy Britton’s blog about hidden disability. Sam CleasbyIt’s a topic that’s clearly dear to a lot of people’s hearts because when Sam Cleasby followed it up with a blog about her #MoreThanMeetsTheEye campaign it got people talking all over again. And when our very own community champion, Hannah Postgate blogged about being a working mother, it went straight to the top of our most-read blogs.

Here’s a tip

One of the most popular features on the online community is our dedicated tips section. Here you can search for tips on just about everything, from travel to technology. All the tips have been contributed by disabled people, parents and professionals, and new tips come in regularly.Lightbulb illustration

Our tips have featured far and wide, appearing in everything from The Guardian and Money Saving Expert to NHS Choices, and The School Run.

Over the past year, we’ve added several new tips sections, including Pregnancy and Parenthood, Dating and Sex, Employment, Employing a PA or Carer and Health and Fitness. We’d love to hear your’s too, so please do pass them on!

We love our new online community so much, we’ve even made a film about it! You can see our community film below. 

Why not join us for a slice of virtual birthday cake on the online community today! 

“Shopping with my son and wheelchair in tow is a challenge.”

Claire is a mum to Daniel who is six. Daniel has profound and multiple learning difficulties. Claire has discovered a great solution for taking her son on their weekly food shop and wants everyone to campaign for better trolley access.

As a mum, taking my son to the weekly shop is a really common thing. But, shopping with my son and wheelchair in tow is a challenge.

I really struggle with both the standard and disability trolleys that are available in most supermarkets. Neither provides my son Daniel with the trunk support that he needs. It is also impossible for me to lift him in to a standard trolley. He’s just too heavy and tall now.

This leaves me with very few options. I could do my weekly shopping online, leave Daniel at home while I go shopping, or settle for buying what I can carry as I push his wheelchair.

I am sure that this is a familiar story to many parents of disabled children up and down the country. All of this changed for me when Sainsbury’s rolled out the GoTo Shop trolley to 650 of its larger stores.

The GoTo Shop is an adapted trolley for disabled children that provides extra postural and head support and a secure five-point harness. The GoTo Shop Trolley keeps Daniel safe and secure on our weekly shop.

The GoTo Shop Trolley has been a revelation for us, it makes life so much easier and Daniel actually really enjoys our shopping trips.

I think every family with this a disabled child should have the opportunity to use a GoTo Shop Trolley, this is the reason why I became a GoTo Shop Trolley Champion.

I am very lucky I have two Sainsbury’s stores near to me, but I like having choice. I love collecting my Tesco Clubcard Points, you can’t beat the Asda Mother and Baby Events, Marks and Spencer for little treats and Lidl fruit and veg every time. So you see, I’d like every supermarket in the UK and Ireland to have a GoTo Shop Trolley.

If you’re looking for a supermarket with GoTo Shop Trolleys, you can use the Firefly Finder App.

How to get involved

If like me you’re a parent of a disabled child, who would love to have the option of shopping where and when you want to, then we need to work together to tell every supermarket about the difference a GoTo Shop Trolley can make to our lives.

All you have to do is print out and add your name to this leaflet (PDF) and hand it in to your local supermarket managers.

Let’s raise awareness of the challenges we face in our daily lives as parents of disabled children. By showing how simple solutions can make a huge difference to families like ours we can encourage all our supermarkets to provide GoTo Shop Trolleys.

If you’re not a parent or carer of a disabled child, don’t worry! You can still get involved. Support the #GoToShop Trolley in #EverySupermarket by using our ‘Friends of’ leaflet (PDF).

You can read more about the Firefly Garden GoTo Shop Campaign on their website.

“I wasn’t going to do it for charity this year. But I saw Scope is the official charity – it made sense!”

On 2 August more than 15,000 amateur riders will take to the streets of London and Surrey for the third Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 – a 100 mile route on closed roads.

700 of those will be taking part for Scope as part of our official charity of the year team, and one of those is Carl. He knows the route having taken part in 2014 and will be hoping the sun shines, unlike last year!

“Box Hill was okay. But Leigh Hill was shut, we had to go down a diversion because of the weather and that was horrendous. So I’m hoping it’s not like that!” A keen cyclist, he’s often out with his friends testing themselves on the local hills. But there’s nothing quite like event day. “I think if you ride for a charity, the support you get on the day is fantastic. I rode with a couple of friends who weren’t riding for charity and they were completely in awe of us getting cheered on.”

Carl’s reason for taking part is his nephew. Connor was born prematurely and has cerebral palsy. Connor’s mum, Lauren, explained how they initially found out about his diagnosis through their physiotherapist. “One day I got asked to fill in some forms – I asked her for help because it asked what was wrong with him and I didn’t quite know what to say. She just said “well it’s cerebral palsy” but nobody had actually told us that. We were quite shocked. We just thought it was because he was premature, that he would catch up.”

Connor has received fantastic support from the local community. His first play group had a sensory room and it was here that he first walked – a great milestone when the family had been warned he probably wouldn’t walk or talk. “He walked properly. He was nearly three when he started, the same week as his cousin who was one.”

The family first came across Scope when they were looking for help choosing Connor’s secondary school – the local authority recognised that Connor was bright and wanted to place him in a mainstream school. But Lauren and her husband, Kevin, felt that Connor progressed more with one to one support at a specialist school. Connor went on to prove them wrong, attending the local secondary school and gaining good results in his GCSEs. From speaking to Scope and another charity called Network 81, they were able to encourage the school to make the alterations Connor needed for his education, including having his lessons on the ground floor instead of up two flights of stairs. But now, the real work begins – deciding what Connor should do once he leaves college. Connor is keen to get involved in a local community project, the Harwich Mayflower project, where he can socialise and discuss doing an apprenticeship.

Cricket posterWhen Carl saw that Scope were the official charity for this year’s Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100, he felt it made sense to do the full 100 mile route with us. “Technically I didn’t complete it last year. It was 87 miles; it wasn’t 100 (due to the weather) so I felt a bit of a cheat.” He’ll be continuing his training and fundraising over the next few months, including a cricket night called Essex Legends, hosted at a local venue.

There’s still time to be a part of Scope’s Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 team. Get your place today and be treated to a hero’s reception, a massage in our chill out zone and TLC for your bike!