Tag Archives: Disability Gamechanger

Our toolbox of tips that every parent of a disabled child needs daily!

The Ratcliffe Family consists of two dads, Garry and Kyle, and four kids – Haydn, Isobella, Curly and Phoebe – three of whom have a disability. Haydn has cerebral palsy and is blind in one eye, Bella has Downs Syndrome and Curtis has a number of impairments and conditions including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, global developmental delay and he is blind too.

Here Kyle and Gary, write a letter to you to help you in the journey to get a better start in life for your disabled child.

Dear Parent,

We are writing to you as two dads of four awesome kids.  Three of whom have a disability. We wanted to let you know about some of the things we have picked up over the years.  Our toolbox of tips, tricks and attitudes that every parent of a disabled child needs on a daily basis!

Tip one

Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Never let anyone tell you that your child “can’t” do something because of their disability.

It’s currently Half Term, and our kids are already exhausted!  It’s only Wednesday and we’ve already been punting on the river in Canterbury, pumpkin picking in Medway, Chinese buffet eating, Leeds Castle exploring and sightseeing in London.

Two adults behind four children in a London Eye Pod. Two children are in wheelchairs and three are wearing hats.
The Ratcliffe Family on the London Eye

Curtis loves the smell of the flowers, Bella loves the variety of food at the Chinese, Haydn enjoys being surrounded by different people to talk to, and Phoebe (our non-disabled daughter) gets the chance to explore and climb.

Each of our children gets something different out of every experience. Our children get to do everything that every little person should do!

Tip two

Warrior parent needs to come out every so often

Be prepared to face a side of you that you might never have seen.  Warrior parent needs to come out every so often.  When your child isn’t getting a good deal, don’t be afraid to challenge people.  Whether in a shop, during a visit to an attraction or a medical service you encounter on a regular basis.

There should never be an apology or excuse made for our children.  We always make sure they are treated equally. Good luck to any shop assistant that thinks it’s okay to show us to the disabled changing facilities in a shop, that is clearly being used as a second stock cupboard. Not acceptable.

Tip three

Start to build up a series of questions ready to challenge systems

What to do when you are at your wits end with frustration.  It will happen, regularly. Usually with people that really should know better.

Start to build up a set of questions. Use flashcards if you need to in the early days. Some questions we have found useful are:

  • “What policy does this ridiculous decision come from?”
  • “What is your complaints procedure?”
  •  “Who is your line manager?”
  • “Explain to me how this decision is in the best interests of my child?”
  • “Do you know the contact details for our local MP?”

These are all useful when challenging systems – systems that were often designed for the majority of the population  – but never designed for the people that need them the most!

Tip four

Appreciate the small things. Celebrate the smallest steps

As we are sitting here, writing this letter to you, we would like to say to you, appreciate the small things.  Celebrate the smallest of steps.  Live in the present and be thankful for every little success.

14
Curtis smiling

Yesterday, we took about 50 photos of our son, Curtis, who was having a particularly good day. Not because he had just won a football match, not because he swam a length of the swimming pool. Not even because he managed to tie his shoelaces for the first time. But because he smiled. Yes, that’s right. Curtis smiled yesterday. The most infectious, smiley smile that you could ever imagine. A smile that curled up one side of his face. A smile that said “I’m really happy today, dad”. A smile that made us smile too. It’s not the big things that matter when you have a disabled child. It is the smallest step, the greatest achievements that mean the very best.

Last tip

Worry about the things you can control

Having a disabled child will mean that there are dark days as well as light ones.  But hey, that’s parenthood!  If you have a non-disabled child, you might worry about their friendship groups as they get older. We have worries too, as parents of disabled children. All we would say is, don’t let things worry you that you can’t control.  Worry about the things you can control which is why, right now, we are off outside.  To swing on a swing, slide on a slide, to push some warm hot chocolate through a feeding tube, and hope and pray for one more sunny day.

8
The Ratcliffe family enjoying the seaside

Your sincerely

Garry and Kyle Ratcliffe

Now is the Time to be a Disability Gamechanger,  sign our petition calling for a new Minister for Disabled Children and Families.

Appoint the first ever Minister for Disabled Children and Families. This appointment would lead to improved accountability for how laws and policies affecting disabled children and their families are made. A dedicated Minister can strengthen how Government and services like the NHS work together to make sure families receive the right support.

Things like this stop me from living my life the way I want to

Bal is a post graduate student at Staffordshire University, disability activist, former President of their Student Union and has Generalised Dystomia.

In this blog Bal shares her campaign story to ensure taxi fares charge the same for all and how she helped change the law.

In 2015 I led a campaign to highlight the disgracefully high taxi fares that disabled people often face. It was stunningly successful; the law was changed, and bad practice prosecuted. But since then it appears taxi firms in my home town have blacklisted me.

Since moving out of home and becoming a student, taxi drivers have been a thorn in my side. I soon discovered that I was being charged significantly more for taxi journeys around the city than my non-wheelchair user friends, this moved me to act. I took part in undercover filming with BBC’s Inside Out which highlighted this existing national problem in a regional city setting. As a result of this, the law was changed. I then used this amended law by reporting the driver of a wheelchair accessible taxi to the local council’s Licensing department for refusing to take me to the train station. This driver was then successfully prosecuted and fined by the Magistrates Court.

A victory for wheelchair users

However, for me personally, because I was the public face of the case for the prosecution, not so much. I feel like I have been blacklisted in Stoke.  I find it impossible to book a taxi using my own name, (a task that seems to be easy for my non-disabled friends), with the taxi operators always saying that there are no available wheelchair accessible taxis when I give them my name.

Am I being paranoid? Well, when I wanted to go to the cinema with a mate, I rang to book a taxi; after being told by seven different companies that there were no wheelchair accessible taxis available I asked my friend to use her phone to try and book a taxi under a different name. She rang the first company that I had tried and they sent a vehicle straight away.

This is not a one-off event. Another example since the court case included not being able to attend a friend’s birthday meal. All the taxi companies that I called said that they had no accessible taxis available and, as I was alone, I couldn’t get anyone else to book the taxi for me. This left me with fear of missing out . On a recent night out, I was turned down by 15 taxis, despite using a small manual wheelchair that would fit in any car boot. Eventually after an hour in the cold and rain, a taxi agreed to take us.

Things like this stop me from living my life the way I want to

In a wider context taxi drivers overcharging or refusing to take people like me, prevents wheelchair users from living life with the same level of freedom as non-disabled people. Recently I was quoted £35 by one taxi driver and £10 by another on the same taxi rank, the disparity is shocking and has obvious financial implications. I have previously been quoted £55 for a 1-mile journey after a night out when the going rate for that trip is only £10 for everybody else.

Before I was involved with the court case I used taxis a lot more than I do now because they were reliable and on time and, the flexibility and convenience that they gave me was far preferable to using the bus service. However, since the court case I have had to change the way that I plan my journeys and my social life. I try not to let it stop me doing what I want to do, but in some instances, I simply have to change my plans and stay home because I have no way of getting where I want to be, especially at night. This really infuriates me as I feel I am being targeted.  I know that some people may say that I have brought this on myself, I don’t feel that I should have had to accept being discriminated against for being a wheelchair user.

Of course, I’m not alone in experiencing discrimination when travelling. Disability equality charity Scope have recently found that 40% of disabled people often experience issues or difficulties when travelling by rail in the UK and 25% of disabled people say negative attitudes from other passengers prevent them from using public transport. Although campaigning for equality has had some negative repercussions I will always continue to fight for fair and equal treatment with taxis and in all other aspects of life too.

This is a shout out to all taxi companies in Stoke on Trent, please let me know if you have got any wheelchair taxis that will be willing to take me and my friends and not overcharge us. After all I just want to be treated like everybody else.

We know there is still work to do until all disabled people enjoy equality and fairness, with transport playing a huge part in this.  We all need to work together to change society for the better.

There’s something everyone can do to be a Disability Gamechanger so get involved in the campaign today to end this inequality.

Will you be a Disability Gamechanger?

Today, Scope launches a new campaign to tackle disability inequality head on. Head of Policy, Campaigns and Public Affairs, James Taylor, tells us why it’s an issue we all need to get behind.

“Negative attitudes, poor access to support or transport, limited opportunities for work.

Disabled people tell us that these things matter. They lead to discrimination, to prejudice and to being seen as an afterthought.”

“The things that people say to you never go away. There have been times where bad attitudes have made me ask, what’s the point?” – Marie

“People with invisible impairments still struggle for people to ‘believe’ their condition is real.

On buses, trains and planes we’re often denied equal service and equal treatment.

When we want to go on a night out, the disabled toilet is often an extra storage cupboard, because we’re not thought of as customers.

Hear from some of the storytellers in this film, highlighting the barriers disabled people face in their day-to-day lives.”

The scale of the issue

“Our latest research shows how many disabled people feel and experience this.

We spoke to disabled people right across Britain to find out about their day-to-day lives – what makes them happy, what angers or frustrates them and what they want to get out of life.

We wanted to understand what equality means to disabled people today, and we wanted to start from what disabled people think and feel, and how important independence is to them.

Overwhelmingly disabled people told us they want to be independent, to have confidence and to be connected through friends, family, colleagues and communities.

Yet for too many disabled people this isn’t the case.”

“I’ve been excluded from social situations or activities due to my condition. People make assumptions about what I am able to do. It’s really frustrating.” – Shani

“Earlier this year, Opinium polled 2,000 disabled adults for Scope and found:

  • 49 per cent of disabled people said they feel excluded by society
  • Just 23 per cent said they felt valued by society
  • On top of this, only 42 per cent of disabled people believe the   UK is a good place for disabled people

These statistics make it obvious that the fight for disability equality is far from over.

Throughout the last century we’ve seen action that has led to dramatic changes in our society, but our research demonstrates that there is still a way to go until all disabled people are able to live the lives they choose free from discrimination and low expectations.

At Scope we want to change this.

Whilst we might have protection in law, at Scope we know there is still a way to go until until all disabled people can enjoy equality.”

You can read more about the research in our report, ‘Independent, Confident, Connected’.

Be a Disability Gamechanger

“We have launched our new campaign calling on all those who want to work with us to show their support for disability equality. It doesn’t matter if you’re a bus driver, a politician, a teacher or an employer. You can all make a difference.”

We can’t do it alone. We know that we are stronger as a movement, as a community and as a force for change, when we work together.

If you, like us, want to end this inequality, join our campaign today.