Tag Archives: donation

When is diving out of a plane a good idea?

Scope’s Digital Film and Media Officer, Phil, talks about his experiences of doing a sponsored skydive for Scope. Visit our website to see what fundraising events you can get involved in this year.

Phil smiles wearing a skydiving jumpsuit

I started work at Scope in November 2014 and within a few months I decided I wanted to do some fundraising. Now, I was a little too lazy to stop eating cake to do a marathon, which also meant that a Machu Picchu trek was a definite no. Because of this, I came to the ridiculous decision that I should do a skydive.

I have many fears… Spiders, clowns and even a ridiculous fear of seaweed (you know, when it brushes up against your leg while you’re swimming in the sea?). But one of my biggest fears has got to be heights.

What better thing for an acrophobic person to do than fling themselves out of a plane? For some reason, it seemed like such a good idea at the time!

Raising the cash

With only a few months to go until the big day, I had to get some serious fundraising underway.

I started with the usual route of sharing my JustGiving page with family, friends and across my social media channels. This got a fairly good response with just over £200 being collected in a week.

However, I knew I needed to do more. I decided to step it up.

My first port of call was Krispy Kreme who offer dozens upon dozens of doughnuts to fundraisers at a reduced cost (find out more about using Krispy Kreme doughnuts for fundraising on their website). One morning, I brought in 120 to the office. News spread and I soon had a large queue forming at the stall I’d set up in reception. Not only is it a surefire way to raise lots of cash but if there are any leftover, you’ve got some scrummy treats to make your success taste even sweeter.

Next was my raffle. I scoured the local area and came up trumps with a whole host of amazing donated prizes. From a signed Man Utd shirt to a pair of cinema tickets to a case of locally brewed ale – there was something for everyone! This is a fundraising technique that everyone should think about doing. All you need is a letter of authorisation from the charity you’re raising money for and to be ready to sell your cause to potential donors.Phil stands in front of a plane with his skydiving instructor

The money was coming in thick and fast now but I wanted to do one final push to raise those last few pennies. I organised a pub quiz at Scope HQ which had a great turn out. There were prizes, drinks and lots of laughs. All in all, it was a fantastic evening.

At the end of my (tiring!) fundraising, I’d managed to raise around £1000, which I was extremely happy with. That was the hard part over. But the hardest part was just around the corner – the skydive.

Facing my fear

The day of the skydive came around so quickly. I’m not even going to pretend that I was calm and collected at this point. Words cannot describe how terrified I was. The video below should give you a good idea of what the day was like.

I would urge everyone to take part in a fundraising event, especially an adrenaline event such as skydiving. What an experience!

My top tips

  1. Start your fundraising early. This will allow you to take your time thinking up the most effective money raising techniques.
  2. Think big. Without doing this, I wouldn’t have got the massive collection of prizes donated by larger companies (including VUE cinemas, Manchester United and Naked Wines)
  3. Persist! You may think you’re annoying people across social media with your constant fundraising asks, but you need to drive the message home in order to raise the maximum amount possible.
  4. Update everyone involved. Make sure you send an update and a thank you to everyone involved in the success of your fundraising efforts. For example, I sent a personalised thank you letter to every company and individual that donated a prize for the raffle.
  5. Have fun! Make sure you fundraise in a way that feels fun and makes you happy – it will feel so much less of an effort this way. If you love baking, do a bake sale!

Phil during his skydive, falling through the air with his thumbs up.

Inspired by Phil conquering his fears? Find a fundraising event you can get involved in this year. 

“Working with Scope is never boring”

Guest post from Malt Films – the creative team behind our new shop stock appeal film – a spoof of the iconic Cadbury’s Milk Tray ads. We’re aiming to get one million items donated to our shops this July – and we hope you can help us!

Here Malt Films talk about how it came about, and how Scope have challenged their thinking towards disability. 

It was a hot spring day, which is lucky in England. Even at 7am as we unloaded equipment and explored the luxurious home that would be our workplace for the next 13 hours, the camera crew and director were discussing the best order of the day. The challenge was that although we were filming in strong sunlight, the film needed to look like it was nighttime, and the position of the sun and the shadows would be important.

Stunt man dressed in black standing on a high wallThe stunt man – a ridiculously talented 24-year-old called Pip, was being given makeup and everyone on set was excited for the moment he would jump (hopefully unharmed) from the upper floor balcony. We were rushing to get as much filmed as possible before our star, Adam Hills, arrived at 9.30am; and so we were pressing-on, filming stunts that would make even a hardened athlete envious – it would be a tight schedule!

There’s one thing we have come to learn working with Scope – it’s never boring. We’ve met loads of incredible people with stories that highlight why we Storyboard artwork sketches of different scenes for the filmneed to change society so that disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. We’ve also been helping out on Scope’s current End The Awkward campaign that’s challenging people about their attitudes towards disability with honest personal anecdotes from disabled people. So when we were asked to help Scope produce the 2015 Great Donate stock appeal film, there was a real buzz in the studio.

This year’s film would be a spoof of the classic Cadbury’s Milk Tray adverts and spoofs are not always easy. How similar can the films be for it to work?  Will the original advertisers mind? How do you turn a chocolate box into a Scope donation bag? These were all questions we had to answer as well as writing the script, producing a storyboard, and getting permission to use the iconic music from the original advert.

Holly Candy smiling, holding a donation bag and walking down a streetThe shoot would be split into two days. A full day in Buckinghamshire, where Adam Hill’s character would break into a stately home to leave a donation bag for a lucky woman. This sees him overcome a high perimeter wall, navigate some aggressive dogs (comically played by ‘sausage dogs’), and some laser beams (because all good films have laser beams). The second day would be a half day at a Scope shop in north London where we meet Holly Valance from Neighbours, as the lucky lady who learns (spoiler alert) that she may not have been the only person he visited that night.

Adam Hills standing next to the stuntman in a garden, both dressed in blackThis project proved to be as exciting as we’d expected. A healthy rivalry developed between Adam Hills and his “ridiculously good looking” stunt double, who had been drafted in for some of the more impossible moves.

Adam rivaled Pip with his own cartwheels in a battle of who could perform the most stunts. We had a classic ‘continuity blues’ moment when Adam arrived wearing a bright yellow and green prosthetic leg as opposed to his usual skin-coloured one. And to make it more dramatic, a swan decided to perform a series of excitable manoeuvres of its own, right in the middle of the dilemma.

Adam Hills sitting on a wooden bench and holding a sausage dog on his lapSuch is the nature of film-making, for all the best laid plans there are always challenges that need to be overcome and unexpected moments you might film that become unscripted nuances. There is one big unscripted gag in the final film – can you guess what it is?

If you’re interested to see some of this first hand, we also produced a behind-the-scenes film too:

All in all, we’re extremely proud to have been a part of such a dynamic, entertaining and challenging campaign.

What do you think? Has it inspired you to take a bag of donations to your nearest Scope shop

Film of the week: “Leaving a gift in our will in our daughter’s name”

Scope have been promoting the importance of legacies (gifts left by generous supporters in their wills) over the past couple of weeks. The gifts left to us make up almost a third of the money we raise each year so they’re a vital source of income for us as a charity.

We went to visit two of our pledgers, Gordon and Sheena Halcrow, to find out why they thought it was such an important thing to do.

If you’d like to find out more about leaving a gift in your will to Scope, then visit the Legacy pages on our website.