Tag Archives: Education

Haylee’s friends

A guest blog from Emma, author of Haylee’s friends, a new story book for young disabled children.

Haylee's friends ebook cover

About a year ago my daughter, Molly, became aware her left hand didn’t always do the things she wanted it to do. Sometimes she got quite cross with it when it was uncooperative. It has a habit of going off at an unhelpful angle which is awkward for her and gets in the way.

Molly’s frustration prompted me to look for some books to help explain in simple terms what cerebral palsy is. Unfortunately, there wasn’t anything that was child friendly or presented cerebral palsy in a positive way.

After some encouragement from friends, and of course motivated by Molly’s questions, I contacted Scope to see if they had any story books to help Molly understand. As our conversations went on I asked if they would help me write a book to answer these questions, they agreed.

Getting started

I arranged to meet one of the Scope team at the Kidz up North exhibition 2012 to discuss our ideas. Whilst at the exhibition I bumped into Molly’s occupational therapist Michelle and we got chatting about what I was doing at the exhibition.

A couple of days later Michelle emailed me offering to write the book with us, and so the project started. Michelle had never written a children’s story before but it was on her “one day I would like to do” list, all she needed was some inspiration! After a few luxury hot chocolate meetings, the story started to take shape.

Michelle spoke with speech and language and physiotherapy colleagues to hear what they would like to have included in the story. She also met up with a family that she has been involved with for a number of years and asked both the parents and the older child with cerebral palsy, “if this book had been around when you/your child started school, what would you have wanted it to say?”

The answers were to provide the central theme of the story.

“Never say it is all going to be okay, because it isn’t. But if you do your exercises and wear your splints, it can make things a lot easier”. And “however hard it is and however much you don’t want to, always answer your child’s questions truthfully”.

Molly’s help

Throughout the process of developing the story, Molly insisted on being part of it, giving us lots of inspirational ideas and letting us know if she didn’t like something. She vetoed some of the illustrations, like the original pictures of Lilly, the walker, which were met with a very disapproving face from Molly! She also gave us suggestions of what to include, like using her fork and knife and helping to name the characters. Most importantly, she wanted our family dog to be the model for Toby in the illustrations.

Now Haylee’s Friends is published Molly is our best advocate for it. She loves sharing it with anybody willing to sit down with her. Visitors to the family home this summer have all benefitted from Molly sharing “her” book with them and her school friends have commented that “it tells you the things that help Haylee” and “I like the bit when the lead gets tangled up.”

The story has really helped Molly to understand why her body behaves like it does and it has helped her to share this new understanding with the people she meets. Now we hope that Haylee’s Friends helps other children, their families and friends in the way it has helped Molly. Already it is making its way into primary schools in the Harrogate District, it has been shared at Portage training sessions and is appearing in Children’s Centres, Child Development Centres and libraries.

We are all so excited and we hope to have a celebration and launch somewhere local to where it was written and where the hot chocolate was drunk very soon.

A limited number of hard copies are available. If you would like a copy please call 02920 815 452 or email training@scope.org.uk. You can also buy it as an ebook on Amazon.

Honorary degree for Scope’s Chair

Alice MaynardScope’s Chair, Alice Maynard, has been recognised for her significant contribution to society by the University of York. The University, where Alice also did an undergraduate degree, has given her an honorary degree.

Alice has been chair of Scope since 2009. She is also founder of Future Inclusion Ltd, which works to encourage good governance, inclusive practice and ethical business.

Alice was previously Head of Disability Strategy at Network Rail, and in 2001 was seconded to Transport for London where she developed its first social inclusion plan.

Here is an extract from an interview with York Vision, in which Alice describes what the honorary degree means to her…

Firstly, congratulations! What does honorary degree from the University of York mean to you? 

Thank you. It’s amazing. It’s a bit like getting to the top of Everest (not that I ever have) without actually having to make the effort to get there. It was great getting the doctorate that I’d worked for, but I’d worked for it, whereas this is a real gift and an honour.

You have BA in Language from the University of York. How did your time at York help you become what you are today? 

I had a great time at York. I learned a huge amount – not just about language and linguistics. It was a time when I really became a grown-up. I began to understand what I was capable of in the big wide world. I was effectively a fairly small fish in a big pond rather than being the big fish in the small pond that I had been in the girls only special school I went to as a teenager. But I did end up using my language and linguistics. When I left York I was working in the IT industry, and my second job involved localising a US product for the European market. I found my linguistics really useful for that. It made me a valuable team member, and enabled me to demonstrate what I was really capable of and really shine. It was in that job, and the subsequent job with another US company, that I really established myself in business and laid the foundations that helped me get my MBA, set up companies, and even chair Scope.

What are the biggest challenges for disabled graduates entering the labour market in 2014? 

There are enormous challenges for any graduates entering the labour market in 2014. When I graduated, it wasn’t all sweetness and light – I had a choice between two jobs and, fortunately, the one I chose was secure. Had I chosen the other, I would have lost it straight away. They rescinded their offers to all graduates because of the economic conditions at the time and several of my student friends were affected. But I guess today part of the issue is there are just more graduates now than there were in 1980. So if you’re disabled, the competition is even more fierce, and although the attitudes of many employers have improved over the years, disabled employees can still be seen as a potential burden on the firm rather than a really valuable potential employee. Disabled graduates need to demonstrate even more strongly, therefore, what their ‘unique selling point’ is and find a company that will appreciate them. But they still need to look for somewhere they can work that they can really passionate about, though, because if you enjoy your work you’re most likely to shine – and doing something you hate is pretty miserable anyway!

What do you hope to achieve as chair of Scope?

At the very least, I’d like to think I’ll leave the organisation in a better place than I found it and give the next chair a solid foundation to build on. But really I want to make sure that when I step down in October this year I leave an organisation that is fit for the future and better able to achieve its vision of a world where disabled people have the same opportunity to achieve their life ambitions as everyone else does. To do that, I have to make sure that the Board is fit for purpose: that the right people with the right skills, who are passionate and knowledgeable about the issues, are round the table, and that they work effectively as a team. Then they can both support and challenge the Chief Executive and his senior team as they implement our strategy so Scope can drive the change in society that will move us all ever closer to that vision.

Film of the week: Jamie’s story at Craig y Parc school in Wales

Meet 17-year-old Jamie Love – aspiring star of the future.

Jamie is a student at Scope’s Craig y Parc special school for disabled children (near Cardiff, Wales). In this new film from Scope, he talks about how the school has inspired him to follow his dreams. For information about other Scope schools.