Tag Archives: Extra Costs; disabled families

Scope’s 2014 highlights

2014 has been a really exciting year for Scope – full of awkward, nostalgic, sexy and some just Breaking Bad moments. We’ve rounded up a selection of just a few of the most memorable. Let’s hope 2015 is just as eventful!

Name change

We celebrated 20 years since we changed our name
from The Spastics Society to Scope, with a Parliamentary reception. We also looked at how life has changed for disabled people in that time.

The extra costs of disability

The Price is Wrong game show bannerCan an adapted BMX for a disabled child really cost four times the amount of the average child’s bike? Well yes, it can – and that kind of shocking fact is why you all got so involved with our Price is Wrong campaign and 550 challenge, to raise awareness of the extra costs that disabled people and their families face for everyday items.

Top films

Man bending over to talk to a wheelchair userOur End the Awkward adverts featuring Alex Brooker got almost 10 million views! They helped us to raise awareness of the fact that 2/3 people feel awkward when talking to a disabled person, mostly because they don’t want to offend or are scared of coming across as patronising. But we can all get over it!

Disabled model taking off his clothes in Scope charity shopThis year, our Strip for Scope film shocked everyone with a cheeky play on the sexy Levi’s Launderette advert, featuring disabled model, Jack Eyers. It was our most successful stock campaign –  we received over 1.2 million donated items to our shops.

We also created a film featuring disabled people talking about what the social model of disability means to them, the confidence and liberation it gives them – and how it can encourage everyone to think differently about what an inclusive society really looks like.

Face 2 Face befrienders

Two parents talking in a kitchen over a cup of teaWe were delighted to open new Face 2 Face befriending services in Oxford, Coventry, Lewisham, and three London locations – Islington, Waltham Forest and Redbridge, and Newham and Tower Hamlets. It means loads more parents with disabled children can get the vital emotional support they need, so they don’t feel like they have to cope alone.

Support and information

Our helpline staff have expanded on their lead roles in specialist areas, so they can give more thorough advice to people who need it, and share their knowledge within the team. The areas cover cerebral palsy, social care, welfare benefits, finance and housing, disability equipment and provision, early years, employment, and special educational needs. We also launched a new online community to reach even more people.

Get on your bike

Not only did over 4,000 people take up an events challenge for Scope this year, but we were thrilled to find out that we’ll be the official charity partner of the Prudential RideLondon–Surrey 100 for 2015. It’s worth a whopping £315,000 to Scope and means we have over 600 places for Scope participants.

New friendsRJ Mitte posing for a photo with a young disabled girl in wheelchair

And last but not least, we were very chuffed to welcome RJ Mitte, aka Walt Junior from the hit US drama Breaking Bad to Scope. He has cerebral palsy, but he’s never let it hold him back. He spoke to some young disabled people who are currently on our employment course, First Impressions, First Experiences, to tell them how he started his career.

What have we missed? If you’re part of Scope – what have been the highlights of your year?

Disabled families hit hard by extra costs

Una Summerson, Head of Campaigns at Contact a Family, writes about why urgent action is needed from the Government and energy companies on extra costs for families with disabled children:

Contact a Family’s Counting the Costs campaign found a sharp rise in families with disabled children going without heating and food over the last 2 years. This is leading to ill health. With more than 3,500 responses from UK families with disabled children,

More than a quarter have extra costs of £300 or more every month relating to their child’s disability. The biggest costs being higher heating and utility bills.

Looking ahead, 60% of surveyed families see their financial situation worsening in the next year. Shaped by what thousands of families with disabled children say would help, the Counting the Costs campaign calls for urgent action by the UK government to stop this alarming trend. However, the campaign also recognises it’s not just about making sure the benefits and tax system adequately reflects the extra costs and barriers to work families face.

We are calling for energy companies take action to include all disabled children in their eligibility criteria for the Warm Home Discount Scheme. This scheme may lead to a rebate worth up to £140 on electricity bills. You can qualify if your energy provider is part of the scheme and:

  • you’re a pensioner who receives the guarantee credit of pension credit (the core group)
  • you fall into the ‘broader group’ of people that your energy supplier gives the discount to.

Each supplier has their own criteria for deciding who fits into the ‘broader group’. Some state that disabled children can be part of this ‘broader group’. Some don’t mention them at all, while others accept them if they also have a low income or child under 5. Confused, yes so are we!

Contact a Family’s helpline adviser Marian Gell says “It’s a minefield understanding the different eligible criteria for us let alone busy families. For example, British Gas use Universal Credit to determine eligibility. Since relatively few people are getting universal credit and it seems likely that many families will not be moved onto Universal Credit for several years. A family with a disabled child getting income support and child tax credit would not qualify according to these rules.”

The confusing and differing criteria, alongside the limited time families with disabled children means many often miss out on the scheme. We would therefore like to see a standard approach across all suppliers. Eligibility could be simply determined by receipt of child Disability Living Allowance. Ideally, we need disabled children not just to be recognised as part of the ‘broader group’ but to be part of the core group who receive the discount automatically and don’t have to apply.

Get involved with the campaign or find out about help with fuel bills on the Contact a Family website.