Tag Archives: extracosts

How can the next government improve disabled people’s financial security?

We want the next government to deliver Everyday Equality with disabled people. It must put the interests of disabled people at the heart of its agenda and deliver meaningful change over the next five years to tackle the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

A major barrier to achieving everyday equality is the additional costs disabled people face as a result of their impairment or condition.

That’s why we are calling on the next government to improve disabled people’s financial security.

Life is more expensive if you are disabled

On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. These costs may include expensive items of specialised equipment, higher heating bills, or more costly insurance premiums.

Infographic reads: Life costs more if you're disabled. On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on disability related costs

These costs have a detrimental impact on disabled people’s financial stability. For instance, disabled people have an average of £108,000 fewer savings and assets than non-disabled people, whilst households with a disabled person are more likely to have unsecured debt compared to households without a disabled member.

The financial barrier of extra costs makes it harder for individuals to get into work, access education and training opportunities, and participate fully in their community.

It is vital that the next government tackles the financial penalty experienced by disabled people.

Ensuring disabled people have adequate support to meet extra costs

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) – the successor to Disability Living Allowance (DLA) – plays a key role in helping disabled people meet some of the additional costs of disability.

However, we know that applying for PIP is often a stressful process for disabled people. Our helpline saw a 542 per cent rise in PIP-related calls in the period April 2016 to March 2017 compared to the year previously, many of which were concerning difficulties disabled people and their families were experiencing with the assessment.

The assessment for PIP looks at how a person’s impairment or condition impacts upon their ability to carry out a series of day-to-day activities. We are concerned that this does not always capture the full range of additional costs that disabled people face. This can be seen by the fact that two thirds of individuals are successful when they appeal a decision following their PIP assessment.

That’s why we’re calling for the next government to protect the value of PIP and develop a new assessment for the payment that accurately identifies the range and level of disabled people’s extra costs.

We also know that life is particularly difficult for families where both adults and children face disability related costs.

As such, we want to see PIP and DLA act as a passport to other benefits for families with disabled children, such as free school meals and support with health costs.

Driving down extra costs

Action is also needed to drive down the extra costs that disabled people face in the first place.

Households with a disabled person spend £249 billion a year, the so-called “purple pound”. Yet, disabled people are too often unable to access essential goods and services at an affordable price, making it difficult to capitalise on this spending power.

Many disabled people also encounter poor customer service from businesses, with three quarters having left a shop or business because of a lack of disability awareness.

Two particular sectors where disabled people tell us they struggle as consumers are energy and insurance. For instance, Scope research shows that 29 per cent of disabled people have struggled to pay their energy bills in the past year. In the insurance market, two and a half million disabled people feel they have been overcharged for insurance because of their impairment or condition.

We want the next government to make sure essential markets, such as energy and insurance, have adequate services and support in place to help tackle the problem of additional costs and empower disabled people as consumers.

Tell us what being financially secure means to you

You can read more about our priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does being financially secure mean to you? Email the stories team at Scope and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk.

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.

Come on supermarkets – please stock nappies for disabled kids

Laura is a mum on a mission. She’s noticed a big gap in the market, and is campaigning for supermarkets to start stocking nappies in larger sizes. Here she tells her story. 

“Nothing worth having comes easy.”

Laura and her son Brody smiling on a rollercoaster rideMy life (well, house) is full of quotes. So much so, my best friend jokes with me about it. Still, on the days I feel like I’m fighting a lost cause, this one drives me.

Around a month ago, I started a change.org petition asking leading UK supermarkets to consider manufacturing or selling larger sized nappies, for incontinent children with additional support needs.

There are thousands of children in the UK, older than “typical” children, who are not potty trained. Naturally, as a result they require bigger nappies. Are they easy to find? Of course not!

My son Brody

A close-up photo of Brody amilingBrody has Global Development Delay, epilepsy, hypotonia and hypermobility. In our special world, he is known to a large community as a SWAN – not yet diagnosed with a syndrome to explain his disabilities. Brody is a tall four-year-old. He wears the largest nappies available in supermarkets (– 6+),  but they are fast becoming too small for him. Frustration with this led to my campaign.

Whenever my campaign is posted somewhere on social media, I get people commenting with recurring suggestions: the continence service, pull ups and cloth nappies. Let me explain why, despite this service and these products, I strongly believe there is a huge gap in the market for bigger nappies in stores.

What’s currently available

Brody has recently been referred to the continence service and hopefully, after a waiting time (my friend has been waiting six months so far) we will receive a set amount of nappies per day. These will arrive in bulk. The continence service is great and very much needed for families like ours. However, the service itself is inconsistent, varying greatly depending on where you live in the UK. This becomes more apparent, the more I speak to others. For example, I’ve heard from families who have children with autism who aren’t entitled, families who are only allowed two nappies a day, and families who aren’t eligible for the service until their children are six to eight years old. One woman told me her child has severe chronic constipation, requiring medication and at least 10 nappies daily. But she’s not yet entitled to any help from the NHS.

Pull Ups, which come in slightly larger sizes, are designed for children in the process of potty training. Hence there are fewer nappies in a pack and the absorbency isn’t as good. They’re not adequate for a child who is doubly incontinent. Not only this, it would cost a small fortune for parents to buy Pull Ups, as one pack may last only a day or two.

Cloth nappies may suit some children with additional support needs, and there are some fantastic companies where parents can buy these online. However, this isn’t a best fit solution for every parent and child for many reasons (although, I’ve found a lot of cloth nappy fans will argue this point).

Life costs more when you’re disabled

The simple truth is thousands of parents require larger nappies because their children are either ineligible for the continence service, or require more nappies than they receive. As such, they are forced to buy online because they have no other choice. These nappies come with the classic ‘special needs’ price tag – overpriced! The sad reality is – life costs more when you’re disabled.

Online shopping can also be inconvenient because you have to wait for an order to be delivered. Not as simple as popping to your local supermarket when you’ve run out of a product.

Disabled consumers are a big market

Brody on a red plastic rockerIf you are in my shoes, you’ll be all too aware that people don’t think about these things unless it affects them. However, it really shouldn’t be this hard. The Extra Costs Commission report noted that there are over 12 million disabled people in the UK – that is almost 1 in 5 of the population – and our households’ expenditure, the so-called ‘purple pound’, totals £212 billion a year. That’s a lot of money. And high street businesses could take advantage of it.

I strongly agree with Scope that by sharing information about our needs and expectations as shoppers, and by being more demanding as consumers, companies will have the market data to serve us better. We need to shout loud and let our voices be heard!

We are a community, used to fighting battles. Please fight this one with me. Sign the petition and share it with your friends. Maybe together we can make a difference – one that would benefit many families.

My message to the supermarkets?

You have the opportunity to take the lead and cater to a huge consumer group – one that is often disregarded. Please listen. This is about supply, demand and inclusion. It’s simple – there is a demand for this product and you can provide it. Just take M&S as a wonderful example. Grandmother, Rita Kutt wrote to them and explained the need for larger sized clothes with popper buttons for disabled children. They listened! We are consumers – like everyone else – that should be heard.

What do you think? Could you benefit from being able to buy this product in a supermarket near you?

The Extra Costs Commission has called for disabled consumers to be ‘bold and loud’ just like Laura.

Consumer power! M&S release new clothes range for disabled kids

Rita’s adorable young grandson Caleb has cerebral palsy. He needs nappies, and he’s also peg fed through his stomach, so accessible clothing with poppers is pretty essential. Rita noticed a huge gap in the market for affordable clothing for older children, and contacted Marks and Spencer to see if they could help. 

This blog has now moved to our online community.

Join Rita on our online community where she tells her story.