Tag Archives: George Osborne

What does the Autumn Financial Statement mean for disabled people?

Wednesday was International Day of People with Disabilities. By coincidence, it was also the day of the Autumn Financial Statement. Although the Chancellor’s speech and the accompanying documents only addressed disability explicitly a handful of times, nonetheless his policies will affect disabled people.

Prior to yesterday’s announcements Scope called on the Chancellor to:

  • Link and match investment in the NHS to investment in social care.
  • Invest in Access to Work and specialist employment support to enable more disabled people to enter and sustain employment.
  • Protect the value of extra cost payments.

So how did the statement match up to what we asked for?

1. Linking health and social care

The biggest announcement, trailed heavily before the speech, was a further £2bn investment in the NHS.

But it should be clear that without greater investment in this country’s social care this will remain a false economy. Social care, for both older and disabled people is in crisis. Unfortunately, as Scope’s Chief Executive and Chair of the Care and Support Alliance, Richard Hawkes, stated – ‘care was conspicuous by its absence in the Autumn Statement.’

A little less concrete than a budget promise, but still welcome, was the commitment to continue to integrate health and social care locally. Tucked away in the statement was the promise to give councils and CCGs more information about funding they will receive in future years so they can plan together. A slightly technical point yes, and not enough to counterbalance years of underfunding, but this has the potential to drive a stronger focus on supporting working-age disabled people to live as independently as possible.

Other good news was the announcements made concerning carers. These are:

  • The Carer’s Allowance earnings limit will increase in April 2015 from £102 to £110 per week
  • The Government will extend the £2,000 annual National Insurance contributions Employment Allowance to those households that employ care and support workers.
  • Care workers will be exempted from the impacts of removing the £8,500 threshold below which employees do not pay Income Tax on benefits in kind.

2. Employment support

Unfortunately no announcement regarding Access to Work was made yesterday, nor any significant changes to the way in which employment services for disabled people operate.

However, the decision that an additional £3m will be made available to expand existing mental health and employment pilots is a really positive step. It is now important that the learning from these pilots are effectively captured and applied to employment services as a whole.

3. Extra costs

Osborne announced that Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Personal Independent Payments (PIP) would be protected in any future freeze of working age benefits. Whilst we recognise that the freeze will adversely affect many disabled people in the ESA WRAG group and on JSA, protecting DLA/PIP is an important part of ensuring disabled people can meet the extra costs they face.

Scope warmly welcomed this move at the time, and we were pleased when in this was confirmed in a separate announcement made by the Minister for Pensions Steve Web.

 

George Osborne has to support vital care in next week’s budget

Do you get annoyed at how long it can take to get things done sometimes? Simple things like trying to reach someone at a helpline or waiting in busy traffic can be pretty frustrating – never mind something as important as trying to make sure everyone who needs care gets it.

Ema - a young woman using a wheelchair, holding a dogOn Monday MPs had just that chance during the latest stage of the Care Bill. The Care Bill is an important new law looking to improve social care for people like Ema, to make sure she can live her life the way she wants to.

It’s been a long road to get to this point. There’s still a lot to be done to make sure everyone who needs care gets it, but thanks to the great support for our campaigns – MPs know now more than ever just how important this vital support is.

From the 25,000 people who contacted their MP by sending them a postcard in one of our shops, to the people who sent in photographs that we hand delivered to Parliament, it showed MPs just how important social care is. We even asked people to Speak Out for Care and send their own message to their MP on giant speech bubbles, and to go one step further and record a message for one of our speaking cards just a few weeks ago.

But there’s still more we need to do.

The decisions about the specifics of who will be able to get care have still to be made. A consultation is going to run over the next few months ahead of another vote by MPs in the autumn.

In the meantime we want to make sure that the proper funding is in place to pay for this vital support for disabled people. So when MPs go to Parliament for the Budget next week, we want to send them a clear message that they need to invest in care.

Do you want to add your voice? Join with people from across the country and send the Government a message on Facebook or Twitter to fund social care.

Autumn Statement – what’s in it for social care?

Guest post from Megan Cleaver, Parliamentary Officer at Scope.

Today’s Autumn Statement was the last big political announcement of 2013. But what was left out of the Chancellor’s speech this morning was just as revealing as what was included.

The A&E crisis has dominated the headlines over the past few months, with investment in social care seen as one way to ease the pressure on hospitals. But despite rumours overstretched social care budgets would be given a boost today, on this the Chancellor was silent.

Such a commitment to extra funding would have been especially welcome given the second reading of the Care Bill in the House of Commons was also announced today. The Care Bill contains the biggest ever reforms to the social care system, and its debate on 16 December will be the first opportunity for MPs to debate changes to social care which will affect over half a million disabled people.

And providing good quality social care can bring huge economic benefits. George Osborne spoke at length in the Autumn Statement about the need to get the benefits bill down and get people working. For disabled people, social care is the cornerstone of their independence- the support they need to both seek and stay in employment.

Indeed, recent research by Deloitte has shown that investing in social care for disabled people with ‘moderate’ care needs – who the Government have stated they intend to shut out of the social care system by tightening up eligibility for care – creates considerable savings for the public purse. Deloitte found that for every £1 that is spent on moderate social care needs, £1.30 is saved through increased tax revenue to the Treasury and a reduction in welfare spending as a result of disabled people and informal carers entering the workplace, not to mention the significant savings to local authorities and the NHS from ensuring disabled people’s needs do not escalate to crisis point and therefore require more expensive medical treatment at a later date.

And when George Osborne states that the job of getting rid of the deficit ‘is not yet done’, these are financial savings that cannot be ignored.

International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Today is International Day of Persons with Disabilities, a UN-day. The theme for this year’s is: “Break Barriers, Open Doors: for an inclusive society and development for all”.

It’s an opportunity to celebrate the achievements and abilities of disabled people, with activities taking place around the world, from Gateshead to Australia.

Here in the UK, the past year has given us much to celebrate.

British double leg amputee and Paralympic Gold medalist, Richard Whitehead, highlighted just what could be achieved when he ran a marathon a day this summer from John O’Groats to Land’s End, to raise money for Sarcoma UK and Scope.

Holly Greenhow, a seven year old with cerebral palsy, continued to break down barriers by starring in the new Boden advertising campaign.

And five disabled campaigners won their Court of Appeal bid to overturn the Government’s decision to abolish the Independent Living Fund (ILF), which currently enables 20,000 disabled people in the UK to live independent lives in the community.

2013 has also been a tough year

But away from the successes spiraling living costs, and cuts to welfare and local care are leaving many disabled people in a critical situation.

Recent research by Scope found that disabled people are three times as likely to draw on doorsteps loans than the general population.

On ITV Daybreak this morning, Scope’s chief executive Richard Hawkes warned of a crisis in living standards facing many disabled people, with 1 in 3 older and disabled care users getting in to debt to pay for essential support to get up, get dressed, and get out of the house. Ahead of the Government’s Autumn Statement on Thursday, Scope are calling on Chancellor George Osborne to improve the standard of living for disabled people.

The WOW Petition

Comedian Francesca Martinez was interviewed by ITV Daybreak sofa this morning, explaining her support for a campaign calling on the Government to find out the total impact of all welfare cuts on disabled people. The WOW Petition has now been backed by over 100,000 people – which will enable it to trigger a debate in Parliament.

Francesca Martinez, who has cerebral palsy, has used comedy to challenge attitudes towards disabled people, and to fight for a fairer system. She believes that humour can be used to break down barriers.

Share your examples of people breaking barriers and opening doors this year – in the comments below, on Twitter or on Facebook.