Tag Archives: insurance

I wish I could just ring up an insurance company and get a quote like everybody else!

Disabled people often struggle to access affordable insurance. Our research shows that 26 per cent of disabled adults feel they have been charged more for insurance or denied cover altogether because of their impairment or condition. Actress and disability campaigner Samantha Renke, who has brittle bones, shares her experiences.

Whenever I go abroad, travel insurance is always an issue. Given the nature of my impairment, and the high cost of wheelchairs, I wouldn’t dare go on holiday without it. Unfortunately, the lengthy process and the extortionate costs are something else.

Companies ask me the most intrusive questions

When I phone up to buy insurance, I have to go through a 30 to 40 minute interview. They’re not medical professionals at the end of the line but they probe into my health: Are you suicidal? Are you on medication? Have you had operations?

It’s such a lengthy process. You feel anxious. You feel interrogated. It really infuriates me because non-disabled people don’t have to disclose their mental state. Non-disabled people don’t have to disclose how much alcohol they’re going to consume. Why should disabled people be interrogated?

With brittle bones I get asked if I have scoliosis, a condition where the spine twists and curves to the side. My spine has been straightened and there is no issue, but this isn’t taken into consideration.

Black and white profile shot of Sam Renke smiling
Samantha is supporting our campaign for better access to insurance

My travel insurance is almost as much as my flights

Then the final quote I receive is through the roof. When I went to Mexico for two weeks the quote came out at nearly £500, which was nearly as much as my flights.

I’ve always been able to find a way to pay the extortionate cost for travel insurance, but I know a lot of people wouldn’t manage.  I wouldn’t go on holiday otherwise – I just wouldn’t risk it.

Ironically, I tend to be more vigilant on holiday

The irony is, with me having brittle bones, I’m not going to get on a jet ski! Disabled people on holiday are more likely to be hyper-vigilant because you’re not in your comfort zone.

I think attitudes towards seeing disabled people as ‘high risk’ needs to stop. Anyone can have accidents on holiday, anyone could die on holiday. What’s the justification for the high prices?

Hopefully things will change and disabled people will be able to ring up any old insurance company and get a quote like everybody else!

Join us in calling for better access to insurance for disabled people. Find out more about the campaign and how you can get involved.

We want to find out more about disabled people’s experiences of purchasing insurance. Please get in touch to share your story.

How can the next government improve disabled people’s financial security?

We want the next government to deliver Everyday Equality with disabled people. It must put the interests of disabled people at the heart of its agenda and deliver meaningful change over the next five years to tackle the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

A major barrier to achieving everyday equality is the additional costs disabled people face as a result of their impairment or condition.

That’s why we are calling on the next government to improve disabled people’s financial security.

Life is more expensive if you are disabled

On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on costs related to their impairment or condition. These costs may include expensive items of specialised equipment, higher heating bills, or more costly insurance premiums.

Infographic reads: Life costs more if you're disabled. On average, disabled people spend £550 a month on disability related costs

These costs have a detrimental impact on disabled people’s financial stability. For instance, disabled people have an average of £108,000 fewer savings and assets than non-disabled people, whilst households with a disabled person are more likely to have unsecured debt compared to households without a disabled member.

The financial barrier of extra costs makes it harder for individuals to get into work, access education and training opportunities, and participate fully in their community.

It is vital that the next government tackles the financial penalty experienced by disabled people.

Ensuring disabled people have adequate support to meet extra costs

Personal Independence Payment (PIP) – the successor to Disability Living Allowance (DLA) – plays a key role in helping disabled people meet some of the additional costs of disability.

However, we know that applying for PIP is often a stressful process for disabled people. Our helpline saw a 542 per cent rise in PIP-related calls in the period April 2016 to March 2017 compared to the year previously, many of which were concerning difficulties disabled people and their families were experiencing with the assessment.

The assessment for PIP looks at how a person’s impairment or condition impacts upon their ability to carry out a series of day-to-day activities. We are concerned that this does not always capture the full range of additional costs that disabled people face. This can be seen by the fact that two thirds of individuals are successful when they appeal a decision following their PIP assessment.

That’s why we’re calling for the next government to protect the value of PIP and develop a new assessment for the payment that accurately identifies the range and level of disabled people’s extra costs.

We also know that life is particularly difficult for families where both adults and children face disability related costs.

As such, we want to see PIP and DLA act as a passport to other benefits for families with disabled children, such as free school meals and support with health costs.

Driving down extra costs

Action is also needed to drive down the extra costs that disabled people face in the first place.

Households with a disabled person spend £249 billion a year, the so-called “purple pound”. Yet, disabled people are too often unable to access essential goods and services at an affordable price, making it difficult to capitalise on this spending power.

Many disabled people also encounter poor customer service from businesses, with three quarters having left a shop or business because of a lack of disability awareness.

Two particular sectors where disabled people tell us they struggle as consumers are energy and insurance. For instance, Scope research shows that 29 per cent of disabled people have struggled to pay their energy bills in the past year. In the insurance market, two and a half million disabled people feel they have been overcharged for insurance because of their impairment or condition.

We want the next government to make sure essential markets, such as energy and insurance, have adequate services and support in place to help tackle the problem of additional costs and empower disabled people as consumers.

Tell us what being financially secure means to you

You can read more about our priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What does being financially secure mean to you? Email the stories team at Scope and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk.

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.