Tag Archives: London

If I became Mayor of London

Voting is in full swing as the people of London decide who will be the Mayor of their city. This time tomorrow, the decision will have been made and the new Mayor of London will be ready to make their first moves. We asked some of the Scope For Change campaigners what they would do if they became Mayor of London.

Becca

“I would endeavour to make all modes of transport accessible for wheelchair-users. I say endeavour, because I realise that this could be quite expensive, all things considered, and the term ‘disabled-friendly’ has a habit of being quite subjective. Therefore, a consultation for disabled people would be vital to get opinions on what needs changing. The fact that only 25% of tube stations on the Underground are accessible is a big issue that needs to be dealt with.

With more ramps and spaces for wheelchairs (which is also required in rail services), this will also benefit those with small children in buggies. ”

Becca, a young woman, smiles in a power chair

Jack

“I would establish a new free of charge emergency helpline for disabled people who are victims of disabilist attacks on the streets. I’d also ensure extra training is provided for police officers to effectively support those who are disabled or are vulnerable individuals generally.

A new Deputy Mayor will also be appointed with a specific portfolio in ‘Wellbeing and Inclusion’, incorporating the needs of disabled people and ensuring the emotional wellbeing of the population remains high on the agenda.

Lastly, I will work closely with TfL to make sure the process of fully accessible underground stations is accelerated, with the busiest stations taking priority.”

Jack, a young man, smiles at the camera

Becky

“I would  make sure that all of London’s transport system is accessible for everyone. The same with all of the attractions.”

Becky, a young woman in a power chair, smiles at the camera

Gabi

“As humans we are unique, we’ve travelled different paths and experienced different pain. I’d want to introduce methods to help people recognise difference positively; putting an end to stigma, discrimination, bullying and years worth of irreversible emotional damage.

Disability, ethnicity, sexuality, status, class, age, gender, religious and cultural beliefs will no longer be attacked or ridiculed. Having identified in my life as an openly disabled, gay, catholic, homeless woman, I feel best placed to head the ‘celebrating diversity’ campaign and hope to make this a citywide priority.

Challenge the stereotype, not the person!”

Gabi, a young woman, smiles at the camera

There’s still time to vote in today’s elections. Read our blog on voting to make sure you’re clued up on your rights and options. 

If I can help even one parent through difficult times, it will be worth it

Guest post from Rahna (above right), a befriender at Scope’s new Face 2 Face service in Redbridge and Waltham Forest, London. Befrienders offer emotional support to parents of disabled children – and they all have disabled children of their own. 

Rahna’s daughter Husna, 15, has a rare progressive condition called Friedrich’s ataxia.

My daughter Husna was four years old when she began to display the symptoms of Friedrich’s ataxia and Asperger’s syndrome, and we finally received a diagnosis when she was eight.

Rahna and 15-year-old Husna, a wheelchair user, outside their house
Rahna and her daughter Husna

Friedrich’s ataxia is a rare inherited disorder that causes progressive damage to the nervous system. We were told that Husna would gradually lose the use of her legs and arms, become blind, deaf, lose the ability to eat, swallow and speak.

There was nothing we or anyone else could do. For a parent, there is nothing worse you can hear.

How I felt

My world had fallen apart. I was dealing with my own emotions and everyone else’s. Every day was a struggle, and normal life as I knew it no longer existed.

I remember desperately wanting to speak to another parent whose child was going through a similar experience. It wasn’t until years later, when Husna started at a special school, that I found out that any kind of support existed.

Four female audience members applauding
Rahna (second from left) at the service’s launch earlier this month

I always had a lot of support from family and friends, but I felt unable to share all my feelings with the people around me – I was seen as the strength holding everyone up.

And although everyone was being so kind and helpful, no one really understood what I was going through, because they hadn’t been there themselves.

Why I became a befriender

Parenting a child with such complex issues is mentally, physically and emotionally exhausting. The day never comes to an end – it just merges into the night which merges into the next day.

You have to cope with so much, and to be able to speak to someone who has been through similar experiences, and share your anxieties and fears with them, really helps you feel less alone.

I first heard about Face 2 Face when I was approached by Andrea, the coordinator, at my daughter’s parents evening. Immediately I knew it was definitely something I wanted to do.

The training has been almost like being at a support group – everyone felt relaxed and we were able to express ourselves and talk about our personal experiences, knowing we were all in the same boat.

Group of befrienders holding their certificates
The newly-trained befrienders

I would have benefitted tremendously from a service like Face 2 Face if it had been available when Husna was younger. There were times when I was feeling very low emotionally, and really needed to speak to someone who understood.

If befriending means I can help and support even one parent through such an emotionally difficult time, then it will be worth it.

We’re launching four new Face 2 Face services in London this summer, and there are more across the country. Find a service near you.

Why the Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 2015?

There’s just one week left to get your exclusive free place in our Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 team. You could be cycling the 100 mile route alongside people just like Chris who will be taking part for a third time.

“The Prudential Ride London is a huge and fantastic event that I have taken part from the first year. Finishing in the Mall outside Buckingham palace is an amazing experience that gives you a great feeling of achievement. Starting at the Olympic Park is also brilliant because you are following in the wheel tracks of the 2012 athletes who undertook the same challenging course. The support we get from the local communities is absolutely phenomenal with residents coming to the end of their driveways waving and cheering us on even when the weather was really bad last year!

I have a 16 year old son, Kieren, who has Downs Syndrome, so I’ll be riding for him. He needs support with basic day to day things. We’re lucky in North Wales because we have quite a good support network around us. With him being 16 we’re at the transition stage into college and further on in to adult life – obviously Scope services and their helpline is going to be quite important to us.

I’m hoping my family will be coming down for event day although this will depend on how Kieren is. I hope to bring him down with me and then he can come to the start and be there at the finish – fingers crossed he will be there but if not he will be there in spirit.”

Get your place in our team for free today and be treated to a hero’s reception, a massage in our chill out zone and TLC for your bike! We’re hoping to raise over £314,000 and will have our biggest team ever with over 600 riders taking part for Scope.

Zimmer frames are the invention of the devil! – #100days100stories

Fear of falling, social invisibility and Zimmer frames. Valerie Lang, 75, discusses the realities of being older and disabled. She shares her story as part of Scope’s 100 days, 100 stories campaign

A portrait of Valerie Lang, 75, smiling.

I was diagnosed with cerebral palsy as a baby and started to walk unaided when I was six. My walking was inelegant but functional. Unlike many of my class mates, I was spared the horror of callipers. The children who wore them were so terrified of falling over in them that few, if any, learned to walk at school.

As a child, I was fearless. When I did fall, I was small enough to not do any serious damage. I would scramble to my feet and be up again in seconds.

I loved the freedom that walking gave me. I still do.

Help when I needed it

As a young adult, I studied and worked in London. If I fell over in the street, people would always stop and help me up. I’ve fallen in the middle of busy roads, landed in a heap at the top of a tube escalator, and been thrown from the back of route master buses. On each occasion, someone was always there to ask if I was OK.

Today, as an older disabled woman, I have become totally invisible. On the street, people ignore me, walk in front of me… some nearly walk into me, but fortunately they don’t because my mobility scooter would hurt them.

I’ve been on my hands and knees on the pavement clearing up after my dog and people will just walk past. They don’t stop to think why a grey haired old woman is kneeling on the footpath. That didn’t happen 30 years ago.

The bubble society

We live in a ‘bubble society’. So many people on the streets today are on their mobile phones, or in a rush to be somewhere else. It is as if we are all hermetically sealed into our own private little plastic bubble. We don’t have the time or space to think about the people around us.

I also wonder whether people are afraid of doing the wrong thing, and perhaps getting sued. Or it could just be that health and safety has won out and that people are no longer willing to take a risk.
Whatever the reason, it leaves me even more reluctant to walk anywhere unaided.

Fear of falling

As I’ve got older, I’ve learned that confidence matters far more than physical ability. I broke my ankle some years ago, just falling sideways from my own height. That accident shattered my confidence. If I do fall now, I can’t get up by myself. Today, when I leave the house, I’m all too aware of the potential dangers.

Unfortunately confidence cannot be summoned up at will. I have stood at the side of my car, looking at the six foot gap to my garden hand rail, and muttering to myself ‘don’t be an idiot,’ but I can’t take the first step. The fear would cause me to fall.

The art of walking

My mum always believed that if I only concentrated totally on how I was walking, I could learn to walk perfectly. I never did because I am unable to give full attention on placing my feet carefully for more than a few paces. I am much more interested in what I am about to do.

I use a trolley to help me balance and get around when I’m walking. I think that zimmer frames are the invention of the devil. To shackle old people to such clumsy objects is cruel. Turning 90 degrees requires one to pick the wretched thing up and move it round a bit, at least eight times. It is enough to put anyone off trying to walk. As with wheelchairs, anyone dispensing them should be made to use one first, for at least a week.

A step backwards?

I was lucky to be young in the 60s. In spite of the equalities legislation that has come in since, I was walking – albeit unsteadily – in a narrow gap in history when the few disabled people who were out and about, found society to be less judgemental than it may have been through history, and sadly seems to be now.

Find out more about 100 days, 100 stories, and read the rest of the stories so far.

Why did Valerie campaign to change the name of The Spastics Society to Scope?

Five things I’ve learnt about accessible events

Disabled Access Day takes place tomorrow. It’s a day about getting out there and trying something new! The Science Museum in London was recently named as one of the most accessible tourist attractions in Britain so we asked one of their Special Event Developers, Claire Hazell, to share their advice on how they do it.

Being a Special Events Developer means that my team and I write, develop and present a large programme of events aimed at families during holidays and weekends. We also run a variety of events aimed at making the Science Museum accessible to everyone. During my time I have learnt a lot about museums and their role in accessibility, here are my top five things:

1) There is a big difference between accessible and inclusive

Presenter signs
Presenter signs “Galaxy”. Everyone who attends the show learns a few science related signs.

Our deaf-led SIGNtific programme is a great example of an accessible and inclusive event. The science shows, storytelling sessions and workshops are all presented in British Sign Language and are suitable for both deaf and hearing visitors. They are on during the day and advertised to everyone that comes into the museum. It’s a great way to increase deaf awareness in hearing children and to include deaf children and adults in museum activities.

Our Early Birds early morning Autism event is different. The museum opens early five times a year for families with children on the autistic spectrum. The museum is quieter and there are tailored events and activities for the families. This event is accessible but does not include everyone. This is because it can’t include everyone; the reason we open it up to families early and make the spaces limited is so that the museum is quieter and has less going on. Families asked us to run the event this way and our research has shown us that this is the right environment for their needs.

2) Accessible means different things to different people

Gallery at the Science Museum
(photo credit)

Every visitor that comes to the museum wants to get something different out of their visit. From finding their favourite object, or enjoying a new gallery to just finding a toilet!

Making the museum accessible can mean different things for everyone. It could just mean giving someone a map so they can find their way around but it could also mean coming to an event which has provision for their needs. We try to make the museum accessible for as many people as possible and we are always willing to take suggestions and listen to what our visitors want from us.

3) Don’t make assumptions

Interactive gallery
Launch pad (photo credit Heather Cowper)

While planning for a recent Early Birds session we did some research and found out that sensitivity to loud noises was common among children on the Autistic spectrum. We decided that we should turn off all loud noises and try and keep the museum as quiet as possible. We had planned to turn on one of our large engines and as such included this in our visual story. Families were able to avoid the engine as it was only turned on late in the session. What we found was that lots of families loved seeing and listening to the engine and talking to our engineers about the engine. We assumed that this wouldn’t be the case because of some research we had carried out.

We soon realised that we should never assume and we use this attitude in all our new developments and make sure we look at developments from every angle and assume nothing!

4) You can’t do it alone

Where do you start when trying to run an event when you don’t know much about what the event would need?

You start with people that would know. When we developed our new audio described event we spoke to local councils, charities, specialist organisations, schools, other museums, and of course families themselves. The information from these groups was invaluable and will help the team provide a new event that opens up the museum and its collection to even more people.

5) Taking the first step is hard but the rewards are worth it

Convo 800x392All our events had to start somewhere. A brainstorm, a query from a visitor or an idea you have just before you go to sleep. But turning that first idea into an event can be daunting and sometimes scary.

All our events have amazing teams that run them and supportive managers to coordinate them. It is always an amazing accomplishment to open the door for an event for the first time. I loved seeing the smiles on the faces of the families when they came into the museum for our first Early Birds session, and I still find it amazing to see children communicating with our deaf presenters in sign language. I’ll end with a quote from one of them:

“SIGNtific is fantastic at encouraging children to learn about science without realising they are learning, a brilliant opportunity for deaf and hearing children and their parents to talk and share their experiences after the events. It is always a thrill to be a role model to all children at the events!”

Find out more about accessibility at the Science Museum.

Get involved with Disabled Access Day.

Lack of representation of disability in the fashion industry

Guest post from Chelsey Jay – model and ambassador for Models With A Disability.

People often say to me –

“Chelsey, what is the hardest part of being disabled?”

They imagine me to answer with what you may think is the obvious – how hard it was to give up my career, or how hard it was to have to leave my house behind and move into a bungalow and a whirlwind of ramps and wide doors.

But in fact, even though these things did cause significant heartbreak and anguish, the hardest part of becoming disabled, for me, was the fact that, at age 20, not only was a wheelchair thrust upon me, but so was a sudden eternity of exclusion.

It wasn’t just my mobility that I lost back in November 2012, but unbeknown to me, my significance as an individual would be stripped away too. Not through my own choice or decision. But by those that believe a disability is you and not just a part of you.

The Fashion Industry is a powerful, powerful industry.

It instructs us on what we should/shouldn’t be wearing that season, the latest era to be revisiting, whom from an array of famous faces we should be inspired by, what staples we all need in our closets, but most of all, and by far most important of all, it gives every single person who follows it, the vital sense of belonging.

That is however, unless you are disabled.

Through Models Of Diversity, a Campaigning Group that contacted me almost a year ago, I now am the Ambassador For Models With A Disability and I strive to change the aforementioned.

I will not have the fact that I essentially ‘stay sitting down’ stop me from being reflected in mainstream media – and on the larger scale, I am fighting for all the other 11million disabled people in the UK too. Not for special treatment, but the same treatment.

We may have missing limbs, or suffer with debilitating conditions, due to circumstance or just purely our bodies own choosing, but to have that as our definition! I don’t think so!

I challenge the Fashion Industry to include and not exclude people with disabilities and to realise that they are orchestrating an old fashioned and out dated version of ‘reality’. People want what I like to call the Next Generation Models, people that are not perfect but are an actual illustration of real life! This ‘out of sight, out of mind’ illusion that the Fashion Industry projects on to us, where no disabled people are represented, is just utterly preposterous and an awful, a somewhat bitter reflection of times past when black people were shunned from the world as though they too, did not exist.

In a bewildering puzzle of blame – the industry manages to get away with this clear discrimination. Brands that I pled with blame the Modeling Agencies for not supplying Disabled Models to castings, the Agencies blame the Brands for their non-existent demand for Disabled Models in the first place.

Fundamentally. They all need to be held accountable as they are all to blame.

Along this journey we are gaining incredible support, not just here in the UK but across the pond! LA Talk Radio favourites Dr Estelle Snider and John Johnson, modeling elite such as the likes of Christie Brinkley and other ends of the spectrum, that being, Members Of Parliament such as the Minister For Disabled People Kate Green – we really are gaining incredible momentum.

If the Fashion Industry is so concerned with Disabled People’s ability to model then they seriously need to wake up! Disabled people are attractive too – who knew!

Even though I too am struck with the industries banish, I am taking the power back, and not just for myself, but every other person forced to hide, in the shadow of their disability.

Visit Chelsey’s website and follow her on Twitter.

I was 21, a new mum, and terrified about the future: #100days100stories

We first shared Dionne’s story and film in August 2014. We’re republishing it here as part of Scope’s 100 Days, 100 Stories project. 

Dionne was in her first year at university in London when she became pregnant with Jayden, now aged seven. He has cerebral palsy, epilepsy and global development delays and isn’t able to walk, talk or sit up.

“I had no problems during the pregnancy, the problems started during labour,” Dionne says. “Jayden stopped breathing and had to be resuscitated at birth. He had seizures when he was just a day old and ended up in the special care unit. Doctors had no idea what was wrong with him.”

“I just had to get on with it”

Dionne had planned to go back to university to finish her degree, but Jayden’s care needs and many hospital appointments ma de that impossible.

She also faced a huge struggle getting any support for Jayden. He was born in one London borough but the family lived in a different one, so neither council wanted to take responsibility – and in any case, services were overstretched. Dionne and Jayden were living alone in a mother and baby unit, with no outside support.

“For the first three years of Jayden’s life we had nothing. No equipment at home, no physiotherapy other than a sheet of paper with instructions, and no real support. Everyone was talking but most people were not doing. I had so much hope in care services but time after time I was let down.

“I was 21, terrified about the future and extremely depressed. There were days when Jayden cried endlessly and didn’t sleep at all. We were both exhausted. I was always on standby for something to go wrong with my son and I hated feeling helpless. I was very critical of myself, and so were the people around me.”

“I go back time and time again”

Dionne originally contacted the Scope Helpline for advice about physiotherapy. She was put in touch with Vasu, a Scope regional response worker, who visited her at home to discuss the kind of support she needed.

Since then, they have worked together to tackle a huge range of issues relating to Jayden’s care, health and education. Vasu wrote to social services pushing them to take notice of Dionne’s case, and this led to Jayden finally being offered a physiotherapist.

Dionne says: “Vasu has sent me so much information about sources of funding and the latest treatments for cerebral palsy. He emails me application forms and sends them in the post as well just to make sure I receive them! He rings me unprompted to give me advice and see how I am. He’s even offered to send job opportunities my way.”

RS3249_DSC_0014Vasu also introduced Dionne to a solicitor to pursue a successful negligence
case against the hospital where Jayden was born, which will be a huge help in providing for his needs in the future.

“Out of all the organisations I’ve been to, Scope’s the only one that’s stuck,” Dionne says. “It’s an organisation I go to time and time again because things actually get done.

“Jayden is so aware and so intelligent. No matter what he goes through, even a seizure, he still has a smile for me. He just needs decent support so he can gain the independence he craves. I want Jayden to enjoy being a child, without restrictions, and I want to enjoy being a mum.”

Today is Time to Talk Day, which asks everyone to take five minutes to talk about mental health.

Find out more about 100 Days, 100 Stories, and read the rest of the stories so far.

 

“I’ve talked about doing a marathon for 10 years, and this was the catalyst”: #100days100stories

Dan and Mel first shared their story in July 2014. We’re republishing it here as part of Scope’s 100 Days, 100 Stories campaign.

Dan and Mel’s son Oliver was recently diagnosed with cerebral palsy. Despite seeing specialists since a very young age, they had a long battle to get Oliver properly diagnosed, including nine months’ worth of tests.

“Oliver was different to other children, and we couldn’t explain why. Because of the issues and complex needs he had, he would do things like lick the radiator and lick the floor where it was cold. You’d go out into an environment where there were loads of other kids, and it was very obvious that he was different but we couldn’t explain why. You’d put him down on the floor and he would only crawl a little bit and then he would start eating the end of the table. We laugh at it now because we understand what he’s doing and why he’s doing it, but until that point we closed ourselves off and saw fewer people. We didn’t really want to go out – not because you’re ashamed, but you couldn’t turn round and say ‘This is why he’s behaving that way’.”

Dan and Mel's son, Oliver
Dan and Mel’s son, Oliver

Mel explained that it was incredibly hard to get a firm diagnosis, “but as soon as we got one and accepted it, it made us even more proud of him. We knew he had problems, but we didn’t ever dream he’d have cerebral palsy. I even remember saying at the beginning [of the road to a diagnosis], ‘Oh yeah, but it’s not like he’s got cerebral palsy or anything, it’s not so major.’ He doesn’t look like what many people would think a child with cerebral palsy looks like. He can walk and he’s got a voice – he’s non-verbal, but he has a voice and he uses it.”

Oliver’s condition left many paediatricians guessing for nine months, with Dan and Mel persisting that his behaviour wasn’t right. “At first we went to a private paediatrician who told us there was nothing wrong with him at all. It was at a young age, but other things had been picked up by health visitors. I contacted the NHS to get him into the system and the paediatrician we got is fantastic.” Putting Oliver through months of tests was difficult on his parents, and particularly Dan. “It was certainly hard putting him through it, watching him being tested. He was getting to the point where he understood enough to know ‘Oh, it’s another person prodding me.’ He would cry as soon as somebody came near him, because even though he didn’t understand everything, he understood that things were going on. That was quite difficult.”

For Mel, she was determined to get a diagnosis. “It was really important to me. Not that it changed anything – I don’t care if he’s got two heads! But it mattered, and I can’t explain why. The moment we had a diagnosis and it had sunk in, for both of us it felt like a weight had been lifted.” Dan goes on to explain that “there were definitely more tears shed in the run-up to the diagnosis than since the diagnosis. We do not feel sorry for ourselves or wish for different things, whereas before we were searching. Now there’s no need to search – it’s difficult to get the diagnosis, but once you do it’s a lot of help.”

Dan with Oliver
Dan with Oliver

Dan and Mel are clearly both very committed to their son, persisting to ensure he has the best support and stimulation possible including occupational therapy and sensory integration. It’s clear they have an eye to the future but it is still very early days for them in terms of Oliver’s diagnosis. Getting Oliver’s diagnosis was the catalyst for Dan to take on a challenge he’d been talking about for 10 years – the London Marathon – an emotional rollercoaster or excitement and apprehension. “I went through a phase where there was lots of pressure – you just think to yourself, ‘I just can’t let anyone down on the day’.”

The couple chose to support Scope as it captured a charity that helped others with similar needs to Oliver. “It goes to helping people, that’s the main thing.” Thanks to the overwhelming response of friends, family, colleagues and strangers, Dan has now raised more than £15,000. As well as support at work, Mel explained that Oliver’s nursery did a mini-marathon. “All the kids walked round the park – they raised £1,200, and that was just amazing. I think it makes a difference that it’s his first time running, and we’ve just had the diagnosis. For us, it’s been wow! We didn’t dream we’d get anywhere near this.”

There are still places available to run this year’s Brighton Marathon for Scope on Sunday, 12 April.

Find out more about the 100 Days, 100 Stories project.

Disability doesn’t have to be a barrier to starting your own business

Just four days until our event in London for disabled people who are thinking about setting up their own business, as well as entrepreneurs who have already taken the plunge. Book your free space today! Paul Carter who is speaking at the event explains why disability doesn’t have to be a barrier to starting your own business.

Paul CarterI founded my own media production company Little Man Media two years ago and haven’t looked back.

Leaving full-time employment was one of the best things I ever did, and now I want to show to other people – not just those with disabilities – that being your own boss needn’t be a pipedream, and is something that can change your life for the better.

Flexibility is far and away the biggest benefit of being your own boss. As a disabled person, the ability to be in control of your own time and your own commitments is really, really helpful and can often make the difference between a bad day and a good one.

One of the things I’m often asked is whether or not I’ve encountered any discrimination, prejudice or negative attitudes due to the fact that I’m disabled. For the most part the answer is no. Although there was one memorable occasion when applying for Access to Work funding (the government scheme that helps cover some disability-related costs in employment) when the assessor asked me how I could possibly operate a camera without hands, and that I should consider giving up and trying something “more suited to my condition.”

Such instances aside, I’ve not found that having a disability has been any form of hindrance or barrier, certainly not at least in terms of attracting new business, if anything it has helped open doors. A lot of my work has centred around equality issues and social justice, and being able to bring some lived experience or show that I have an understanding of or connection to my subject is something that people often find appealing.

There are considerable physical and societal barriers to getting disabled people into work so becoming your own boss might be the best option. But it’s not right for everyone and we certainly need more and better awareness among employers that disabled people aren’t going to cost loads of money or have a negative impact on the business – I think there’s still a long way to go there to change attitudes.

An often unaddressed issue is that disabled people’s conditions sometimes fluctuate, and a greater willingness to embrace flexible working would open so many more doors for disabled people, particularly those with mental health problems.

Nobody should be under the impression that running your own business is easy, it isn’t! You never truly switch off from the stresses and strains, and can’t leave work behind at 5pm when you shut down your computer and leave the office. I often find myself thinking about work last thing at night and first thing in the morning. Some people may find that thought unbearable or think it unhealthy, but if you truly love what you do and are passionate about your business, then it becomes an extension of yourself, and you’ll do whatever it takes to make it a success.

Having self-belief and being certain that you’re doing the right thing is absolutely critical, because there will undoubtedly be points where it looks and feels like everything is going against you, and you need to be able to pick yourself up and keep on going. But you need a bit of single-mindedness and the courage of your convictions, because running your own business is the best thing in the world. When you love what you do, it isn’t work. I get to spend my time meeting incredible people, telling amazing stories. Making films has allowed me to meet people who’ve spent time in foreign prisons, Paralympians, politicians, pop stars, and everyone in between. I’ve the best job in the world, and I wouldn’t swap it for anything.

Paul is speaking at a free event for disabled entrepreneurs and disabled people who are thinking of starting their own business in London on 13 February, organised by Natwest, Scope and Livability. 

National Paralympics Day: join the legacy debate

Saturday is the first National Paralympics Day. It’s one more chance to relive the magic of London 2012.

The spotlight will again be on Queen Elizabeth Park. Here’s a plug from Paralympic Judo bronze medallist Ben Quilter:  “There are elite sport matches taking place at the Copper Box Arena, opportunities to meet Paralympic athletes, come-and-try sessions for people to get involved in, and the fantastic Liberty Festival to experience”.

The milestone is also another chance to ask if the Paralympics improved daily life for disabled people.

To mark National Paralympics Day we’re publishing exclusive new interviews with gold medal-winning Paralympian Sophie Christiansen – who’s going to be at Queen Elizabeth Park this weekend – and Tyler Saunders, who left his job last year to make it in wheelchair basketball.

Paralympian Sophie Christiansen asks ‘Did the Paralympics improve the lives of disabled people?’

Professional wheelchair basket player Tyler Saunders  says “Disabled sports have slipped back into the shadows.”

Here is an interview with Tyler reflecting on a what’s happened since London 2012, and here’s Tyler doing pull ups sat in his wheelchair!

And check out disabled entrepreneur (and good friend of Scope) Martyn Sibley. He’s setting off on an epic journey from John O’Groats to Land’s End in his electric wheelchair. Martyn hopes to raise awareness of the challenges disabled people face and how they can be overcome… even if you’re not a gold medal winning Paralympian.

For Scope it is really important that we ask disabled people about legacy.

The Government had big ambitions for how the Paralympics could change the lives of all disabled people (not just Paralympians), and although legacy is a long term project, a year on is a good time to ask how it’s going.

The legacy debate has been bubbling away for the last month.

In July the Government published independent research. Well known former Paralympians had their say. Scope has been asking disabled people, what they thought, and in August we published a summary of their views.

Overwhelming people said that 2012 was an incredible moment, but that one year on legacy is in danger of going off course as a result of hardening attitudes to welfare and a crisis in living standards for disabled people.

There’s still time to join the debate. We want to hear your hopes for Paralympics legacy and what needs to be done to achieve it. Tell us on Facebook or tweet using #paralympicseffect and #NPD13.