Tag Archives: photography

Wildlife photographer shares his top ten snaps

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This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Oliver Hellowell is a young nature and wildlife photographer who happens to have Down’s syndrome. This Nature Photography Day, Oliver tells us what photography means to him.

I was about 10 years old when I first started taking pictures. I like wildlife, I like birds and I like the landscape and taking pictures of the trees. I like water and I like going for walks out into ‘the wild’ and the countryside.

We once had an exhibition and lots of people came to see my pictures. I gave a speech and we sold lots of pictures and with the money I bought a Chinese takeaway for us on the Sunday night when we finished, and bought a week in a holiday cottage in Wales in the middle of nowhere! I’m very proud when I have an exhibition.

My fans say ‘that’s amazing!’ about my pictures and write messages to me. I like it when we get more places to put on the map!

You should give photography a go. Just do it. Just go out there and do what you want!

As part of 30 Under 30, Oliver shares the top 10 photographs that he has taken.

Canada Geese Flying

This is my all-time favourite image. I have a canvas of it in my bedroom. This is my best one with the three Canada geese flying.

A photograph taken by Oliver Hellowell. 3 Canada geese fly over a field

Clown fish in an anemone

I took this through the thick glass of an aquarium which is very difficult. I got the clown fish just right – it’s a really good picture.

A photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A clown fish hides behind an anemone

Cormorant

I took this one and the cormorant was in the tree and looking out and I got it.

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A cormorant bird sits in a tree.

Grey Squirrel

I was on a day out with my friend Adrian and I got this picture of a squirrel. I got it straight on and he’s got his paws up eating and everything it’s brilliant. 

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A grey squirrel eats a nut with its front paws.

Red Kite

I took this at the International Centre for Birds of Prey in Newent. I love the sharpness of this one and the brightness of the eye. It’s just very cool!

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A red kite bird of prey looks menacing.

River Dart in Devon

This is a long shutter speed shot which I’m very pleased with. It takes a bit of effort and you have to keep the camera dead still or on a tripod. I love the colours in the water.

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A shot of a still river shaded by trees. The trees are being reflected in the water,

Single swan

I waited as all the swans bobbed their heads up and down in and out of the water to pick up the food which had just been given out and sunk to the bottom. I waited to catch a shot with just one head and beak showing.

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A group of swans huddle. One swan has his head poking up out of the group.

Tulips

I said to my mum, “Mum you know those red flowers outside in the corner? Well, look! I really got them!”

A close up shot of a bunch of red tulips

From the ground

When I’d just taken this, I called my mum over to where I was standing, pointed to the ground and said, “see that bit of ground there? I’ve just got it just right! See the little green leaves and the light? I got that perfect!”

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A close up shot of the forest floor. A number of small plants are growing through the the soil.

Watersmeet in Devon

I was very pleased with this long shutter-speed shot. I got it by standing my camera on a rock.

Photo taken by Oliver Hellowell. A small waterfall in a river. Trees surround the banks.

Oliver is sharing his story as part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Keep up to date with all of our new stories on our 30 under 30 page.

You can visit Oliver’s website to see and purchase his photographs as prints or greetings cards. You can also like Oliver’s Facebook page and get up to date news from his sightings in your newsfeed. 

“I see more because I see less” – partially sighted photographer Ian Treherne

Ian Treherne is an Essex based photographer, who has Usher Syndrome type II. He was a 2012 nominee for the London Fringe Festival Photographer of the year award.

This is an extract of an interview in #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine Issue 3, written by Daisy Ware-Jarrett and Genea Bailey.

Black and white portrait of the photographer Ian Treherne

Q: Most photographers rely on their vision and visual aesthetics in their work. We’ve read up on Usher Syndrome but for anyone who doesn’t know what it is, could you briefly explain what it is and how it affects you?

A: There are different types of Usher, I have Usher type II, which means I was born partially deaf, then later on in life I found out I had limited vision. My eyesight is basically what they call tunnel vision, I have a small window in front of me that I can see out of. I can’t see below, above and to the sides. It affects me on a daily basis, more so at night time as I rely on everything being lit up. Some days I don’t think about it, sometimes I do. Everyday is hard work, but somehow being stubborn and ambitious means that I seem to just get on with it really.

Q: In relation to your tunnel vision, we found a quote from one of your past interviews saying that your vision is similar to constantly looking through a view finder?

A: Yes that’s correct, though my eyesight is just a little bit smaller than the view finder. I guess I think I see more because I see less if that makes sense. I don’t know any different really.

Q: I (Daisy) found out when I was 10 that I was born with cataracts in both eyes and my eyesight would deteriorate over the years. I also discovered it could lead to operations and in the worst case I could slowly become blind. From this point on I became more creative in all aspects of life, and as I began to take photos, it had a profound effect on the way I made images. They became very visually pleasing and more creative. I almost overcompensate for my fear of losing sight through my images.

Do you feel having Usher type II has subconsciously had the same effect on your work?

Black and white portrait photo of a woman with short shiny fair hair, and a black t-shirt, looking seriousA: Sorry to hear that Daisy. I’m like you, that I have an imaginary clock on my shoulders ticking away. I’ve been told my eyesight may stay the same or it may deteriorate over time. It’s something I don’t think about, but unconsciously I have fire in my creative roots that’s making me do as much as possible while I still have the sight I have. I think myself ‘lucky’, as I’ve met people who have lost their eyesight and are younger than me and are also creative. I see their frustration and it makes me sad, so I guess I’m doing as much as possible.

I’ve only been able to talk about it within the last year, before then I kept it inside, struggled and pretended I was ‘normal’ like everyone else. Last year I did an interview with the BBC and it was my way of ‘coming out’, as many people I’ve known for years didn’t even know I had the condition. It was something I wasn’t able to talk about.

Q: That sounds like a really hard time. Since you’ve ‘come out’ do you feel like it’s helped your confidence?

A: It hasn’t changed my confidence as such, but it was a huge relief to be able to talk freely about it, as I’ve always seen it as being a weakness. I still find it difficult, but I’m able to talk about my condition without feeling bad, which I can assure you was a giant step for me! I couldn’t even be in a room with someone who had the same condition as I found it difficult to face. I’m not very good at being labelled disabled, it’s not a word I feel fits in with me.

Q: Your openness about your experience is really inspiring and by talking about your struggles you are helping other people.

So one obvious question, is why photography?

A: Well I know it’s helped me overcome some of my issues with talking about it, which is huge for me! I think the recipe of stubbornness, ambition, passion, drive for the creative world of photography and bad eyesight, only makes me more determined than ever to be known as a photographer. Knowing there’s nothing I can do about my eyesight, is to make the best of what you’ve got.

Black and white portrait photo of a topless woman with her back to the camera, looking over her shoulder directly into the cameraWhy photography – well I LOVE being creative, whether it’s doing art, playing guitar, or films, making it is what makes me tick. I was never going to be a scientist, I just don’t have that kind of mind, but with being creative I just come alive, I live and breathe it. When I was 15 I used to look at fashion magazines, I remember I was bowled over. Digital cameras weren’t invented at this time, so I carried on with my art work. While digital was making it’s way into the world, I decided I would have a go learning. I sat and learned the ins and outs of the camera. I combined my artistic skills with my camera and the new world of photography opened up. I think because it’s portable, instant and flexible it was the medium that fitted with me.

Q: One of the reasons we found out about your work was due to Photosense, a project we ran as part of #Phonar. It explores the relationship between photography and all five senses, and how they interact with each other. How important do you think the senses are in relation to photography?

A: For me it’s pretty important. For example, I photographed a building once that 99.9% people wouldn’t have noticed. I think with photography it enables me to step out the ‘box’ and look into it with my camera, I literally switch off from the mundane hustle of life and look and see everything as an artistic picture. Most people are so wrapped up with the rat race that they often don’t see the beauty around them. To me it’s obvious, others it takes time or they never really get to see it. I guess photography allows me to show what I am thinking and seeing, I like to share that with people.

Q: And is it this ‘stepping out of the box’ technique that allows you to incorporate all your senses?

A: I don’t analyse how or why I do it. It’s all about ‘the feeling’ which is instinct, you don’t question it, you just do it because you know it’s right. Music can affect your photography in some ways, I always have music on when doing a studio shoot. With my style of photography it’s about elegance, sensitivity, emotion and atmosphere.

Q: It’s really nice that you can see the beauty in such minimalistic things. With my photography (Daisy again) I try to avoid using black and white and enjoy the chaotic kitsch photography of practitioners such as David LaChapelle because I am compensating for having cataracts. So it’s great to see a completely opposite preference.

A: In photography there is no right or wrong, it’s all about preference isn’t it. It would be boring if we all liked the same things.

To see the full interview, head to #PHOTOGRAPHY Magazine

Does your impairment or condition influence or inspire your artwork? We’d love to hear about your experiences and see any images you have to share! 

“Oliver sees details the rest of us miss” – a young photographer’s story

Oliver is a young nature photographer who happens to have Down’s syndrome. Here, Oliver and his mum tell us what photography means to him.  

Q&A with Oliver

Scope: When did you first start taking photos?

Oliver: I was little – I was about 10 years old.

Scope: What is it about nature that you find so interesting?

Oliver: I like wildlife, I like birds and I like the landscape and taking pictures of the trees. I like water and I like going for walks out into ‘the wild’ and the countryside.

Close up photo of an eagleScope: Do you have a favourite animal?

Oliver: I like birds of prey and I really like long tailed tits.

Scope: How did you feel when you sold your first photograph?

Oliver: We had an exhibition and lots of people came to see my pictures. I gave a speech and we sold lots of pictures and with the money I bought a Chinese takeaway for us on the Sunday night when we finished, and bought a holiday in a cottage in Wales in the middle of nowhere! I’m very proud when I have an exhibition.

Scope: If you weren’t taking photos in your spare time, what do you think you’d be doing?

Oliver: I play football and snooker, and I don’t do so much skateboarding so much anymore. I read my books and my magazines and I like to watch TV. I still do bird-watching and walking in the countryside even if I don’t take pictures with my camera.green forest and woodland

Scope: What would you say to other young disabled people who don’t have much confidence?

Oliver: Just do it. Just go out there and do what you want!

Scope: How have your followers on Facebook and the publicity around your photos made you feel?

Oliver: It’s good. I like it. My fans say ‘that’s amazing!’ about my pictures and write messages to me. Yeah it’s good. I like it when we get more places to put on the map!

Wendy, Oliver’s mum

Oliver was born with Down’s syndrome, and severe cardiac issues requiring open heart surgery at three months old. During his early years he was also diagnosed with severe hypotonia (poor muscle tone) and verbal dyspraxia. I was told he wouldn’t be able to take part in sporting activities, and that his speech would probably never reach a point where he could be understood by an unfamiliar lA baby photograph of Oliver with blonde hairistener. However with belief, determination and input from myself and Oliver’s big sister Anna (who was eight when he was born)  by the time he was eight years old he was skateboarding as well as playing football, basketball and snooker, and at 10 years old was asking perfectly clearly for a Subaru Imprezza with a spoiler on the back and a Bugatti Veyron for his birthday!

Oliver is testament to the fact that anyone can achieve and prove negative predictions to be wrong, when they are surrounded by optimism, belief, determination and encouragement. My partner Mike has been best mate and stepfather all rolled into one for Oliver – they both love wildlife, the countryside, and bird-watching. Mike came into Oliver’s life when Oliver was nine. When Oliver was about 10 or 11 he started to want to take photos “like Mike”.

A close-up of some green ivy leavesMike’s targeted tuition and guidance has helped Oliver to use the world of photography as both a tool for him to record what he sees in the way he sees it, and as something which brings Oliver a great sense of pride and self-esteem. He takes pictures of everything and anything which ‘catches’ his eye and will spend as much time and effort on a torn and ragged leaf or some broken sticks as he will on a beautiful bloom. He loves the light catching anything and particularly water. He will spend ages capturing splashes at the bottom of a waterfall or in a rocky river. Birds are probably his greatest love and his knowledge and ability to identify any bird at a glance and even from a distance is astounding. Oliver takes pictures of things other people walk past because he notices the detail the rest of us miss. He sees beauty where we do not, and to a certain extent his having Down’s syndrome ‘releases’ him from the ‘rules’ and expectations of what is perceived to be worthy of a picture, which the rest of us adhere to without even realising. Oliver makes weeds look brilliant!

He is a truly inspirational young man who loves life and loves what he does, and seeks to be a ‘professional’ earning a proper income from his talent. His achievements are changing and improving the expectations A robin standing on some grassof others, championing disability, and helping to banish outdated and negative stereotypes associated with Down’s syndrome. We receive so many heart-warming messages from parents of disabled children explaining the huge difference Oliver has made to their lives by restoring hopes, dreams and aspirations for their children. He illustrates just how important it is that we value and enjoy diversity in society, and spreads the news that ‘difference’ can be something to be truly celebrated.

Oliver was recently featured in a lovely film piece on the One Show, and on BBC news worldwide. He’s currently crowdfunding for his first coffee table book to be published – so get in quick and bag yourself a copy of the first edition. 

You can visit Oliver’s website to see and purchase his photographs as prints or greetings cards. You can also like Oliver’s Facebook page and get up to date news from his sightings in your newsfeed. Feeling inspired?

Using photography to challenge people’s stereotypes

Guest post from Elle Jepson, a photography student at Middlesex University in London.

Four photos of Elle's brother, with difference facial expressionsI think it’s very important to capture people with disabilities and mental health issues in a way that shows it’s only a small part of them, not entirely who they are.

Having had two profoundly autistic brothers and a best friend with schizophrenia means I’ve often battled with prejudice. When I was younger, just being related to two people as profoundly disabled as my brothers, was enough to be belittled and mocked – and I wasn’t even the person dealing with the disability.

These experiences have shown me that people have such a set idea of what it means to be disabled, influenced by what they see in the media and in things like art and photography.

Four photos of Elle's other brotherMy new project is called ‘Identity’, and it’s about how people are boxed into a stereotype once people have found out a person has a disability, and my aim is to take pictures where you can’t tell if the person in the pictures is disabled or not because it’s not about that, it’s about who the person is aside from that.

Basically my aim is to show in portraits that there is more to a person than what they may be diagnosed as, if that makes sense. I feel this project is one way I can help change the bias surrounding disability.

If you’d like to get involved with the Identity project you can email Elle at ellejepson@yahoo.co.uk. See more of Elle’s photos on her blog.