Tag Archives: scope for change

Could you be part of the next generation of disability campaigners?

We are looking for aspiring young campaigners to join Scope for Change, our campaign training programme for disabled people aged 18 to 25. It’s a free, six-month programme, and no previous campaigning experience is needed. Find out more and apply to take part.

Disabled people face many barriers to equality – whether it’s negative attitudes, unnecessary extra costs, inaccessible environments or a lack of support in education or work. But we know that it doesn’t have to be this way, and that young disabled people have the drive and skills to help make change happen.

We first launched the Scope for Change programme in 2016 to support young disabled people gain the skills and confidence to campaign on issues they cared about . This first group of campaigners set out to tackle a variety of issues: encouraging museums to be more autism-friendly, making British Sign Language lessons at university more accessible and affordable, gaining step-free access to local transport, and raising awareness of hidden impairments.

Ellie, who took part in 2016, campaigned for greater accessibility at nature reserves. Here’s what she had to say about her campaign:

“I want to further educate those working in the conservation sector to make sites of natural interest as accessible as possible: providing ramps up to bird hides, having blue badge parking spaces, braille or audio information boards, allowing assistance dogs, and accessible toilets… Opening up the senses in particular for those with profound and multiple disabilities is so important – and where better to do that than a national park?”

It wasn’t just their campaigns that benefited – many of the group said that being part of Scope for Change gave them a sense of solidarity with other disabled people and boosted their confidence. No longer feeling like they were working alone, the campaigners could collaborate, share experiences and learn from each other.

Why get involved?

Now Scope for Change is back for a new generation, to tackle more obstacles on the road to everyday equality. We want disabled young people to be empowered to make decisions about their lives, influence change, and make real progress in their communities and wider society.

Over a six-month period, we will support the Scope for Change group to plan, launch and their own campaigns to make change on the issues that matter to them. This will be backed up with ongoing support from Scope staff and a three-day residential training event to learn all the skills needed to create a winning campaign strategy.

Does this sound like the opportunity for you? Apply for Scope for Change now – applications close on Monday 28 May.

Scope for Change: “Campaigning is a marathon, not a sprint”

Scope for Change, our training programme for campaigners, is supporting a group of disabled people to launch their own campaigns.  To help them on their way, we invited Kajal Odedra from Change.org and Lucy Ann Holmes from No More Page 3 to share their campaigning experiences and expertise.  

“Campaigning is a marathon, not a sprint”

This was one of the key messages which emerged from a training session on Saturday 9 July  when disabled  campaigners involved with Scope for Change came back together for the first time since their residential training weekend in early April.

Seb, a Scope for Change campaigner laughing
Seb, a Scope for Change campaigner

Since the training weekend, the campaigners have been developing their strategies, tactics, and creating change through their exciting campaigns.

The campaigners taking part in the programme come from all over the country and are aged between 18 and 25 with a wide range of impairments.

Coming from a variety of background with varying degrees of campaigning experience, the campaigners are focusing on very different issues and are using different methods to achieve their goals.

The training day was to give everyone the opportunity to meet up, compare their campaigns and share their experiences.

Diverse campaigns for a diverse community

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Kajal and the Scope for Change group

There are nearly 12 million disabled people in the UK.  The Scope for Change group reflects that diversity within the disabled community. Some of the group are focusing their campaigns on making train transport more accessible, while others want to raise awareness of hidden impairments.

A number of the campaigners are working together on a campaign to end domestic and sexual violence against disabled women. Other campaigners are focusing on making museums more accessible to people with autism, making wildlife reserves more accessible and improving access to gyms for disabled people.

Many of the campaigns have a very local focus, as the campaigners want to play role in improving their own communities.

A packed agenda

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Kajal presenting

We had a full agenda with presentations from Kajal Odedra from Change.org who spoke about building your campaign support.  Lucy Ann Holmes from No More Page 3 gave her own personal story of running a campaign and discussed the various challenges she faced.

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Richard from Scope and Lucy from No More Page 3 presenting

Other workshops covered areas such as the importance of robust research to help your campaign succeed and advice on fundraising techniques, as well as advice on how to sell your campaign to the media.

Jack Welch, who’s running a campaign to make museums more accessible, told us how he was going to use some of the more practical advice:

“It was brilliant to have some of the most experienced and prolific figures in the campaigning circuit. What especially struck me was that the more authentic and connected you were to your cause, the greater chance it is to be successful. For me, I’ll personally have to take Lucy’s advice that doing too much in such a short space of time can quickly exhaust you – the impact will be much better if you spread your efforts over an extended time frame. ”

Sarah Troke had been following  Lucy’s No More Page 3 campaign from the start, and thought it was really useful to hear about her positive and negative experiences first hand: “It was really inspirational to hear from someone who had succeeded on such a big campaign, but was also important to hear how she learnt to be realistic and how to deal with ‘campaign burnout'”.

A strong support network

It was great to catch up with everyone and see the progress they have made with their campaigns. It was wonderful to hear the campaigners talk about how being part of the Scope for Change programme has given them the confidence to speak publicly about their impairments for the first time, and explain the impact this had on their lives. Being able to share their experiences has strengthened their resolve to address the negative attitudes and discrimination that affect them and other disabled people.

The campaigners are working hard to improve the lives of other disabled people, including those who may not be able to campaign on their own behalf. Many of them have said that being part of the Scope for Change community has given them a sense of solidarity with other disabled people and boosted their confidence. No longer feeling like they are working alone, the campaigners are part of a group that is struggling for equality and for the same life opportunities that so many of their peers can take for granted.

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Scope for Change campaigners

This is the first time Scope has run this type of training programme. We will be working closely with the current group of campaigners to plan for the next stage for the programme in 2017.  We want to improve upon what has been achieved this year so watch out for applications to open for the next Scope for Change.

I want people to have a say in the future of our country

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This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Alice is a keen campaigner and star of our Scope for Change training program.

As part of 30 Under 30, she shares her experiences of the program, how it has given her the confidence to run her own campaigns and why it is important that everyone uses their vote in the EU referendum.

I’ve been interested in activism ever since my dad introduced me to grassroots politics as a kid. He took me to my first demo when I was twelve years old and I’ve been hooked ever since.

I love the way direct action works, how it unapologetically demands our voices be heard. Change will never come about whilst we are unwilling to engage in the system, despite how broken it may be. Direct action gives us the opportunity to challenge and offer an alternative.

Alice, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera with her dad

Getting the tools I needed

I had never organised my own campaign until I joined Scope For Change. I applied to the program last year and I was over the moon when I found out I had been accepted. We are a group of twenty-two young disabled people all interested in activism.

In March we attended a ‘bootcamp’ where we had extensive training on how to run a successful campaign. We were taught a wide range of tactics from how to utilise social media to getting the support of politicians. This training not only gave me the tools I needed, but also the confidence!

Running my own campaign

Currently I am running a campaign to encourage people in my neighbourhood to vote in the EU referendum. Engaging people in politics is something that I am passionate about. Too many people bury their heads in the sand and become ever increasingly apathetic. I can understand why this happens, I too have little faith in our current political system.

However, I believe referendums give the electorate a rare chance to participate in a form of direct democracy and we should be excited about this opportunity!

Our community is one which doesn’t have much of a voice in society. We live in social housing and the vast majority of us can’t find work because we are disabled. We are often judged and not listened to.

The aim of my campaign has not been to tell people how to vote but to empower them to go out and exercise their democratic right. I wanted people to know that not only does their opinion matter, but that it is significant and can make a difference.

A pile of leaflets relating to the EU referendum. They say "Should we stay or should we go?"

A unique opportunity to have a say in the future of our country

Over the last few weeks I have made hundreds of leaflets and posters explaining how to register to vote and why it is so important to do this. I have printed these in a large font and on coloured paper to make them as accessible as possible. Two of my lovely neighbours have been wonderful and helped me deliver these. I have assisted people to sign up who would have otherwise struggled to do this independently. Door knocking has also played a big part as some people are unable to read English, this has sparked conversations and it’s been interesting to hear how people are voting and why.

Throughout my campaign I have emphasised that we will not be voting to elect someone to represent us, but are being asked a direct question. Should we remain in the EU or should we leave? This is a unique opportunity to have a say in the future of our country and we should embrace this.

On 23 June, I have arranged a meeting place for local people to gather at various times throughout the day. We will be walking to the polling station and voting together. I believe this will encourage people, especially those who are unsure where the polling station is or are unfamiliar with the process. I know some of my disabled neighbours will really struggle to do this independently and my hope is that voting collectively will provide the support they need.

I have always been an activist, but Scope have given me the confidence I needed to run my own campaigns and I can’t thank them enough for this gift. I plan to run many more in the future which I hope will be as successful as this one promises to be!

Alice is sharing her story as part of 30 Under 30. We are sharing one story a day throughout June from disabled people who are doing something extraordinary. Visit our website to read the stories so far.

Are you voting in the EU referendum? We want disabled people to have a clear understanding of their voting rights and options. Read our blog about voting and elections for more information.

We need to do more for disabled survivors like me – Ashley

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This story is part of 30 Under 30.

Trigger warning: mentions sexual assault, rape, suicide attempt

Ashley is a campaigner. As a survivor of sexual assault, Ashley is passionate about bringing about change for disabled survivors, who are often overlooked. Through Scope for Change – Scope’s training programme for young disabled campaigners – Ashley has teamed up with others to set up Disabled Survivors Unite. Their goal is to combat domestic abuse and sexual violence against disabled people.

As part of 30 Under 30, Ashley talks about the need for disabled survivors’ voices to be heard, shares their own journey and talks about their plans for the future.

I am a survivor of sexual assault

I’m going to share my story because I don’t want others to feel ashamed or alone. I was drugged and assaulted in London when I was 21. Due to my autism, I often go non-verbal under stress, but I was very clear that I did not want to have sex with this man, this stranger. What I wanted was of no importance to him. Afterwards, I fell into a deep hole that no one seemed prepared to help me out of. The knowledge wasn’t there for someone like me, a rape victim with autism, chronic illnesses, and ill mental health.

And so the months went by without proper support and, upon hearing the case would not go forward, I tried to kill myself. I remember waking up in the hospital bed with an apologetic doctor explaining that England didn’t have any support set up for people like me. My family watched as my physical health deteriorated and I retreated further into my head. No one knew what to do.

I found support from other survivors

Two years later, I made it to a survivor’s writing session and found a group of people just like me. Most had disabilities of varying kinds and it was the first time since my assault that I felt a sense of purpose. We decided to band together and start something – we came up with The (re)Storytellers Project.

The idea was to create a template to be used at universities for writing groups of survivors and victims to support each other, as the waiting lists for Rape Crisis counselling can be incredibly long. Through this group, I discovered that the most important thing to me was to protect the countless others who had been through what I had.

Ashley at a garden party, smiling with a drink

Working with other young campaigners

Through Scope for Change, a training programme for young disabled campaigners, I learned just how valuable our voices are as young disabled people. We were taught how to utilise social media, film, and various other campaign tactics to get our voices out there; but, most importantly, I think we all came away more confident in asserting ourselves and our varying needs.

It’s hard to express just how important Scope For Change is to me as a disabled person who has spent most of their life incredibly isolated – to be in a room full of fellow disabled people who want to change the world is absolutely glorious.

Why we set up Disabled Survivors Unite

I struggle every day with the knowledge that my situation is not an uncommon one. As I’ve become more involved with the disability community, it’s been made very clear that sexual violence is an epidemic that is rarely discussed with us in mind. It’s my goal to change that.

People like me often go unheard. Disabled people are desexualised to such a degree in the eyes of the public that the possibility of us being victims doesn’t even occur to people. When I was raped, my disabilities were ignored by those in charge of helping me.

At the Scope For Change residential several of us realised we wanted to campaign about similar issues. As a survivor myself, I’ve had many difficulties getting specialised support and couldn’t stand to let others feel alone in that. We want Disabled Survivors Unite to become a non-profit organisation built around fighting domestic abuse and sexual violence against disabled people.

Our plans for the future

Our first step towards our goal is The (re)Storytellers Project. With Disabled Survivors Unite, we’re taking that idea to the next level and collecting stories, letters, and notes of support, anonymously or otherwise, to better amplify the voices of disabled victims and survivors.

We hope that sharing these stories will both create a feeling of community for those involved and bring about change in the way that disabled victims and survivors are viewed and treated.

If you have been affected by the content of this blog, you can contact the Samaritans or Scope’s helpline for support.

To find out more and support Ashley’s work, visit Disabled Survivors Unite.

Ashley is sharing their story as part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Read other stories from 30 Under 30.

Game on! Looking at accessibility in video games

Phil, Scope’s Stories Manager, is a self-confessed video game geek. With game developers and software companies beginning to take accessibility in gaming to a whole new level, Phil and some of the campaigners from Scope for Change talk about their experiences and what should happen next.

I love video games. Sometimes, there is nothing better than holding off a zombie hoard or exploring the deepest, darkest corners of space. However, I will be totally honest and admit that I have never thought about the accessibility of gaming. It’s definitely something that I’ve always taken for granted.

So when Sony released a video last week which detailed the extensive list of accessibility features that they have introduced for the first time in their new game Uncharted 4, it really hit home that many disabled people have missed or are missing out on the gaming world.

The video follows Josh Straub, a disabled gamer, who met with developers of the game to express his frustrations of the lack of accessibility in previous games. Thankfully, the developers listened and introduced a whole host of different features to make Uncharted 4 one of the most accessible video games ever made.

I asked the Scope for Change campaigners to tell me their experiences of gaming and what they think needs to be improved to make games more accessible.

SamSam Pugh, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera

“I do love my video games. I often have issues with them not being captioned, especially with the influx of voice acting in video games – very often the actual game play will be captioned, but opening scenes and extra bits (like in game radio) just aren’t.

I feel like there are some elements of video games that would transfer really well over to a gaming platform designed with visually impaired people in mind. If you take the story and the voice acting and combine them with elements of choice and problem solving, you could create something really strong and immersive.”

Jack Welch, a young disabled man, smiles at the cameraJack

“I’m not much of a gamer myself these days, but I was always a bigger fan of the open ended and more relaxed options, as it was much better for staying calm (e.g. The Sims).”

 

JamieJamie, a young disabled man, smiles at the camera

“Since my stroke, I’ve lost most dexterity in my left hand and using the left trigger/shoulder buttons on my Xbox controller is very difficult. It’s a big problem for playing shooters as these are often the aim/throw grenade buttons. There are a lot of great games where these buttons are less important and phone games and a lot of PC games are far more accessible.

However, I am finding it increasingly difficult to find accessible big budget titles as the industry puts more and more emphasis on making every button on a controller very important. The Dragon Age games are a good example, as the left trigger/shoulder buttons weren’t very important in the first 2 games, but control changes made the third game much less accessible. So it’s a very good sign that developers are becoming more aware of this and taking steps to make the games more inclusive.”

AliceAlice, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera

“Generally, games cannot be played by photosensitive people as most have flashing lights. They now warn people beforehand which is great as we can make an informed decision not to play. It would be amazing for games to be more accessible though!”

 

BeccaBecca, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera

“I like to play video games but I’m not very good at them! A family friend loves video games though and growing up I have noticed that not all games have consistent captions or subtitles which can be difficult for those with hearing difficulties.”

 

SarahSarah, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera

“Ever since I had my head injury, I had real difficulty with games and the noises and explosions. I have really bad reactions and hand eye coordination! My brother and my boyfriend love gaming and when they are playing the noises and lights really trigger me. I don’t really know how much of that can be changed as it’s part of the game really but it would be great if maybe the designers thought about it.”

HollyHolly, a young disabled woman, smiles at the camera

“I don’t really game. There are a couple of blind gamers, but very few mainstream games can be played by us. Just three or four fighting games as far as I know.”

 

CharlieCharlie, a young disabled man, smiles at the camera

“I play a lot of games but only use subtitles as an accessibility option. Generally I think that the games industry is inaccessible, but is trying to reach out. Phone games and handheld games are probably, ultimately more accessible than console ones that use a controller. Games that are on the PC often have more accessibility options.

As with everything, accessibility makes everything easier for everyone and gives people the option to make the choices they want to, whatever media they want to enjoy.”

Close up of someone holding a Sony Playstation 4 controller

Accessibility in gaming is obviously getting better but there is still a long way to go before it can accommodate everyone. The news from Sony highlights how important it is for disabled people to start conversations with game developers on what they need from a game.

Disabled consumers have the power to help shape what the future of video gaming looks like and companies are listening.

Have any questions or advice about accessible video gaming? Join our online community and start a discussion today!

Cover image of Playstaton controller used under a Creative Commons license from here.

#Attenborough90: Why nature should be accessible for all

Ellie is one of our Scope for Change young campaigners. Here she talks about how David Attenborough inspired her to fall in love with nature, and why she believes everyone should have the opportunity to enjoy it. Ellie standing in a corridor, wearing a blue jumper with a dog on it, and smiling

An inspiration

From a young age, I remember waiting in anticipation on a Sunday evening for the latest wildlife programme, narrated by the voice of the natural world, Sir David Attenborough. He’s ensured the BBC have covered a wide diversity of animals from dung beetles to red kites, to snow leopards over the years. This week he turned 90, and the nation has been celebrating by re-visiting many of his iconic TV highlights, such as when he was preened by mountain gorillas in 1979 for Life on Earth.

David Attenborough has inspired many people in this country and the world to stand up and take notice of the animals and plants we share the earth with. As a result, people are more actively involved with local and national wildlife charities, learning about conservation and many have been inspired to work in the industry.

Everyone has a right to enjoy nature

Only a couple of weeks ago, David Attenborough opened Woodberry Wetlands, a new nature reserve owned by the London Wildlife Trust, which is accessible to all. In an interview with BBC news, he talks about the importance of access reserves:

“We are part of it and if we lose contact with the natural world, you lose contact with a great source of pleasure and delight which is your birth right.”

Disappointing experiences

I regularly walk to my local community garden. It’s brimming with wildlife and it’s where I take many photos of toads, grasshoppers and buzzards. My favourite animals are insects, especially butterflies.

Last year I looked into volunteering with my local butterfly conservation charity, as I wanted to learn how to survey species and the different tools used to conserve them. I don’t drive because my cerebral palsy and learning difficulties effect my hand-eye coordination. So I tried to find alternative public transport to get me to the nature reserve, but because I live in such a large county, a lot of the transport isn’t very regular. You have to really plan in advance to make sure you can get home.

In the end, I decided not pursue the role because of the practicalities in getting there and back. It made me feel down because I knew in my heart it was something I really wanted to do, but due to circumstances it wasn’t realistic. It’s a shame there aren’t organisations working with the major environmental and wildlife charities to support more disabled people to get into conservation. I very much doubt I’m the only person with a disability who’s wanted to be involved in this area and been let down.

Getting my ideas together

Though not all has been lost! I’ve had really positive experiences with my local Wildlife Trust. I’ve been involved in various activities, such as getting teenagers interested in getting outside, and supporting primary school children to build insect hotels. At the beginning of this year I was invited along with four other volunteers to be part of Darwin’s Childhood Garden project. We were all asked to contribute something to the project, and I decided to run a workshop for children with disabilities from a local school. We’re now in the process of waiting for funding for it, but in the meantime, I’m wanting to create greater awareness about why nature should be accessible to all.

My campaign to make nature more accessible

‘All for nature and nature for all’ is the name of my campaign. I want to further educate those working in the conservation sector to make sites of natural interest as accessible as possible: providing ramps up to bird hides, having blue badge parking spaces, braille or audio information boards, allowing assistance dogs, and accessible toilets. I’d also love more exclusive workshops that allow disabled people to participate as much everyone else, and having resources such has easy-read, Makaton and BSL signers and accessible transport when needed. Opening up the senses in particular for those with profound and multiple disabilities is so important – and where better to do that than a national park?

I would like to see that nobody is left behind in my campaign. This week, wildlife presenter Chris Packham opened up about his life with Asperger’s. It really highlighted to me that we need to do more, so that many other disabled people feel they can be involved with the natural world.

Ellie would love to hear from disabled people about their experiences at nature and wildlife reserves – the good and bad! Whether you volunteer yourself at your local wildlife park, or have an experience to share from a trip to your local nature reserve, it will really help Ellie to build her campaign. Please leave a comment below. 

If I became Mayor of London

Voting is in full swing as the people of London decide who will be the Mayor of their city. This time tomorrow, the decision will have been made and the new Mayor of London will be ready to make their first moves. We asked some of the Scope For Change campaigners what they would do if they became Mayor of London.

Becca

“I would endeavour to make all modes of transport accessible for wheelchair-users. I say endeavour, because I realise that this could be quite expensive, all things considered, and the term ‘disabled-friendly’ has a habit of being quite subjective. Therefore, a consultation for disabled people would be vital to get opinions on what needs changing. The fact that only 25% of tube stations on the Underground are accessible is a big issue that needs to be dealt with.

With more ramps and spaces for wheelchairs (which is also required in rail services), this will also benefit those with small children in buggies. ”

Becca, a young woman, smiles in a power chair

Jack

“I would establish a new free of charge emergency helpline for disabled people who are victims of disabilist attacks on the streets. I’d also ensure extra training is provided for police officers to effectively support those who are disabled or are vulnerable individuals generally.

A new Deputy Mayor will also be appointed with a specific portfolio in ‘Wellbeing and Inclusion’, incorporating the needs of disabled people and ensuring the emotional wellbeing of the population remains high on the agenda.

Lastly, I will work closely with TfL to make sure the process of fully accessible underground stations is accelerated, with the busiest stations taking priority.”

Jack, a young man, smiles at the camera

Becky

“I would  make sure that all of London’s transport system is accessible for everyone. The same with all of the attractions.”

Becky, a young woman in a power chair, smiles at the camera

Gabi

“As humans we are unique, we’ve travelled different paths and experienced different pain. I’d want to introduce methods to help people recognise difference positively; putting an end to stigma, discrimination, bullying and years worth of irreversible emotional damage.

Disability, ethnicity, sexuality, status, class, age, gender, religious and cultural beliefs will no longer be attacked or ridiculed. Having identified in my life as an openly disabled, gay, catholic, homeless woman, I feel best placed to head the ‘celebrating diversity’ campaign and hope to make this a citywide priority.

Challenge the stereotype, not the person!”

Gabi, a young woman, smiles at the camera

There’s still time to vote in today’s elections. Read our blog on voting to make sure you’re clued up on your rights and options. 

“We are reinvigorating the disability movement” – Scope For Change launches

Scope For Change is a unique scheme from Scope to train a new generation of young disabled campaigners. In April 2016, the first recruits attended a training bootcamp to learn the latest campaign skills and tactics.

 

Young disabled people who we speak to say there are still too many barriers in society that prevent them from doing the day-to-day things that many people take for granted.

Much of this is down to the physical and attitudinal barriers people face along with the negative attitudes towards disability.

Through this weekend, we hoped to give young disabled people the skills they will need to create their own campaigns to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else.

Rosemary Frazer, Campaigns Manager at Scope, said “This has been a long time in the planning but it’s been worth every second of it. The positive feedback that we have had from everyone who attended shows that this hard work has really paid off.”

“Watching the campaigners getting stuck into their campaigning and getting excited about learning new skills was very emotional for me. I was reminded of myself at that age and how I was determined to campaign for disability equality through getting the Disability Discrimination Act.”

“I feel the future of disability campaigning is in very safe hands and I have no doubt that these young activists will achieve great things.”

As Charlie Willis said, these young campaigners hope that they can play their part in “invigorating the disability movement”.

We campaign on a local and national level to change attitudes and to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. Visit our website to find out more about campaigning with Scope.

 

Scope for Change – get involved and change the country

Today we are opening applications for Scope’s new campaign training programme ‘Scope for Change’.

Between the ages of 18 and 25 and want to learn campaigning skills? Then find out more and apply for the new programme.

Young disabled people who we speak to say there are still too many barriers in society that prevent them from doing the day-to-day things that many people take for granted.

Much of this is down to the physical and attitudinal barriers people face along with the negative attitudes towards disability.

Thankfully we know that young disabled people from across the country are passionate about making a Britain a better place. We want to hear from these people who want to campaign for change, meet new friends and learn new skills.

Rebecca’s campaigning

Rebecca Bunce is a campaigner who’s learnt valuable campaigning skills with Scope and Campaign Bootcamp.

“Scope kindly gave me the opportunity to learn exciting and valuable campaigning skills – and now I’m campaigning with IC Change on the important of issue of stopping domestic violence against disabled women. Disabled people must be represented across all campaigns, as disabled people are represented across all of society.”

Scope is working with Campaign Bootcamp to provide this training opportunity of a 10 month course which includes on and offline training modules, including a four-day residential weekend where you’ll meet other campaigners and learn new skills. You’ll learn how to develop a winning campaign strategy as well as the best use of tactics including digital and social media, film and story-telling.

You don’t have to have run a campaign before. You just need to be committed, willing to give up some of your free time and possess a passion to bring about change in your community. 

Sulaiman’s campaigning

Sulaiman Khan is a passionate activist who has many years of experience campaigning on a wide range of issues from improving public transport to increasing the voice of disabled in Parliament. He argues that the key tools for any campaigner is tenacity and good people skills.

Sulaiman wearing a suit and tie in his wheelchair“The most important thing for me as a campaigner is to never give up. However many times you are told no, keep going. If the issue is important enough to you then you owe to yourself to keep going. I would also say to your young campaigners they need to build relationships. It’s vital in any successful campaign.”

If you would like to improve your campaigning skills to help bring about the changes you want to see in your community then please apply today.