Tag Archives: social model

Scope’s 100th film launched – our top 5 favourites to date

2014 was the most successful year yet for film content from Scope. Our videos played a big part in some of our most high profile work to date in things like End The Awkward and Strip For Scope. Along the way we also achieved some fantastic things too.

We now have well over 1,000 subscribers to our YouTube channel. We screened some of our films in cinemas around the country for the first time. We produced our first content in British Sign Language and in audio description versions. We also released our 100th film at the end of the year.

To celebrate, we put together a list of our top five favourite films to date.

  1. End the Awkward – In the office

    495,586 views
    This film is one of the three main adverts for our End The Awkward campaign. Star Alex Brooker couldn’t stop laughing at the funny expression on the actor playing the male office worker’s face. The actor was probably less amused as it meant he had to maintain that awkward expression on his face for half a day.

  2. Strip For Scope

    152,675 views
    This film has the dubious honour of being the first Scope film to feature any sort of nudity – but hopefully you’ll agree that it was done tastefully. Jack Eyers, the male model who features in the film, didn’t allow himself to eat or drink across the day of the shoot in order to maintain the look of his physique.

  3. What is the social model of disability?

    25,913 views
    This film might also have featured silly faces and nudity if Mik Scarlet, who features in the film, had had his way, but thankfully we talked him out of it on the day of the shoot. (Just kidding, Mik.) Thankfully instead, we have perhaps one of the most interesting films Scope has produced to date. It features prominent disabled people discussing the social model of disability – and what it means to them.

  4. Cycle Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 for Scope

    3,830 views
    Scope are really excited to be the official charity partner for the famous Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 bike race. This film doesn’t even go half of the way to illustrating how awful the conditions were on the day in 2014, so a massive thanks again to all our cyclists and cheerers on the day!

  5. About Scope

    5,015 views
    Last and by no means least is our new film all about Scope and our work in England and Wales. We didn’t want to produce a slick, flashy promotional film so this film was shot in a “selfie”-style across a year at locations all over the country by disabled people themselves, along with support from Scope volunteers and staff.

So what was your favourite Scope film from 2014? Let us know in the comments below.

We’ve got some really exciting projects coming up in 2015, so if you want to be the first to see our content before everyone else, please take a minute to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Scope’s 2014 highlights

2014 has been a really exciting year for Scope – full of awkward, nostalgic, sexy and some just Breaking Bad moments. We’ve rounded up a selection of just a few of the most memorable. Let’s hope 2015 is just as eventful!

Name change

We celebrated 20 years since we changed our name
from The Spastics Society to Scope, with a Parliamentary reception. We also looked at how life has changed for disabled people in that time.

The extra costs of disability

The Price is Wrong game show bannerCan an adapted BMX for a disabled child really cost four times the amount of the average child’s bike? Well yes, it can – and that kind of shocking fact is why you all got so involved with our Price is Wrong campaign and 550 challenge, to raise awareness of the extra costs that disabled people and their families face for everyday items.

Top films

Man bending over to talk to a wheelchair userOur End the Awkward adverts featuring Alex Brooker got almost 10 million views! They helped us to raise awareness of the fact that 2/3 people feel awkward when talking to a disabled person, mostly because they don’t want to offend or are scared of coming across as patronising. But we can all get over it!

Disabled model taking off his clothes in Scope charity shopThis year, our Strip for Scope film shocked everyone with a cheeky play on the sexy Levi’s Launderette advert, featuring disabled model, Jack Eyers. It was our most successful stock campaign –  we received over 1.2 million donated items to our shops.

We also created a film featuring disabled people talking about what the social model of disability means to them, the confidence and liberation it gives them – and how it can encourage everyone to think differently about what an inclusive society really looks like.

Face 2 Face befrienders

Two parents talking in a kitchen over a cup of teaWe were delighted to open new Face 2 Face befriending services in Oxford, Coventry, Lewisham, and three London locations – Islington, Waltham Forest and Redbridge, and Newham and Tower Hamlets. It means loads more parents with disabled children can get the vital emotional support they need, so they don’t feel like they have to cope alone.

Support and information

Our helpline staff have expanded on their lead roles in specialist areas, so they can give more thorough advice to people who need it, and share their knowledge within the team. The areas cover cerebral palsy, social care, welfare benefits, finance and housing, disability equipment and provision, early years, employment, and special educational needs. We also launched a new online community to reach even more people.

Get on your bike

Not only did over 4,000 people take up an events challenge for Scope this year, but we were thrilled to find out that we’ll be the official charity partner of the Prudential RideLondon–Surrey 100 for 2015. It’s worth a whopping £315,000 to Scope and means we have over 600 places for Scope participants.

New friendsRJ Mitte posing for a photo with a young disabled girl in wheelchair

And last but not least, we were very chuffed to welcome RJ Mitte, aka Walt Junior from the hit US drama Breaking Bad to Scope. He has cerebral palsy, but he’s never let it hold him back. He spoke to some young disabled people who are currently on our employment course, First Impressions, First Experiences, to tell them how he started his career.

What have we missed? If you’re part of Scope – what have been the highlights of your year?

Alice Maynard on her six years as Scope Chair

In October Scope’s Chair Alice Maynard steps down after six years.

Over the coming months we’ll be marking some of the big changes she has overseen.

We kick off today with Alice describing in her own words the highs and lows since 2009.

In her own words…

I’ve been Chair of Scope since 2008. I’m stepping down this year after two terms.

I’m most proud about how we’ve been able to turn the organisation around financially. Scope wasn’t in a great place. It was struggling to be sustainable. But we turned it around. That has given us the strong foundation to develop a bold, unambiguous strategy, and build an organisation ready to deliver it. We want disabled people to have the same opportunities as everyone else. Everything we do – from our care homes to our campaigns – has to reflect how ambitious we are when it comes to disability. But we have to be financially sound to be able to do this.

My background is in the private sector. Hopefully I’ve helped bust the myth that the commercial and voluntary sectors have nothing to learn from each other. We need to keep breaking down the barriers between the two and bringing learning across the divide.

Our relationship with Disabled People’s Organisations has improved. We’ve put time and effort into being an ally. I was privileged to have the launch of DisLIB as my first public event. If you want to see how far we’ve come, you just have to watch our new video on the ‘social model’. We’re a platform disabled people can use to explain in their own words to the public why thinking differently about disability makes all the difference.

We can be proud of ourselves and what we’re trying to do once again. We have helped people understand what it means to be disabled and the positive contribution we can make to society when properly supported (for instance, in managing the extra costs of being disabled).

The Olympic and Paralympic effect which, though patchy and in some ways hard to hang onto, has changed what people think is acceptable – for instance in access provision in the transport system.

In many ways, life for disabled people in 2008 was easier than it is now – it was just before the financial crisis, laws that demanded disabled people should be treated equally were being strengthened. The impact of the recession and austerity on disabled people and their families has been disastrous, taking away dignity and independence.

I think the future is a challenging place. But there are causes for optimism with the advances in technology that help people communicate, and manage their lives in innovative ways. There are real opportunities with the improvements in the built environment. But we are in danger of losing those opportunities if we don’t actively seek to capitalise on them.

People undervalue disabled people. You can see the impact from hate crime at the extreme end, to just not getting jobs because of unconscious bias at the other.

Scope in five years’ time. Stronger, louder, prouder! You can have as many Chairs in an organisation as you like, but without the volunteers, staff and supporters, nothing will happen.

A piece of advice for the new Chair of Scope? Look after Scope well – it’s precious. Keep it true to its mission in everything it does, use its resources wisely, and you can’t go wrong.