Tag Archives: #SportsForAll

It’s time to shatter your perceptions of sport – #SportForAll

Souleyman is a Team GB Paralympic hopeful and World Junior 100m gold medalist. Having a visual impairment has never held him back in his sport and he is currently working towards competing at the 2020 Paralympics.

Here, he spoke to us about how he feels attitudes have changed since London 2012 and the challenges he faces in his own sport.

The attitude to disability in sport has definitely changed for the better in the past five years. London 2012 gave disability sport a focus, an exposure and a celebration it has never seen before and the world accepted this with huge interest and curiosity.

Since then, it has only improved with more people taking an interest in para-sport. There’s still work to be done such as giving para-sports more coverage and exposure on mainstream channels more frequently. At the moment, unless it’s the Paralympics or World Championships, people don’t get to see the amazing athletes that are competing all year round.

However, I think disability is finally being acknowledged in society and people are seeing that disabled people can do the same things that non-disabled people can do. They just need to do it in a different way.

Souleyman warms up before a race
Souleyman is World Junior 100m gold medalist

Sport challenges perceptions of disability

If you want to shatter your perception of what is possible, then you have to watch a para-sport competition at least once in your life. To see an athlete with no arms or legs complete lengths of a swimming pool or an athlete with one leg do the high jump is just something really extraordinary.

If you are disabled, I think it’s really important to get involved in para-sport at a level you feel comfortable with. It gives you a new purpose and challenges negative perceptions of disability. Your impairment isn’t something that holds you back.

Personally, my visual impairment has brought a number of challenges to my life. To go from being told that I wouldn’t be able to drive, read text or see the incredible sights of the world to now being able to train, compete on a world stage and inspire so many people at the same time is amazing. It’s given me a more positive definition to my visual impairment.

Souleyman pours a bottle of water over his head to cool down following a race
Souleyman cools down after a race

I’m a huge believer in whatever you can imagine for yourself, you can achieve it. It’s about finding what needs to be overcome – more often than not, it’s people’s attitudes.

As part of our mission for everyday equality, we are going to be running a ‘Sport For All’ series to encourage better representation of disability in sport, as well as challenging attitudes towards disability. Find out how you can get involved with Sport For All. 

You can expect new research, blogs, videos and social media events. These will showcase some of the best athletes and storytellers involved in disability sport today.

Keep up to date with #SportForAll on our Twitter.

Read more Sport For All blogs.

How CP Teens and sport changed my life – #SportForAll

Ellie was just 18 years old when she set up CP Teens UK as a way of reaching out to other young people who feel a bit lost and isolated. The response was fantastic and CP Teens UK has grown into a vibrant community, both online and offline. Now, at 22, Ellie continues to pretty much single-handedly run this amazing organisation.

When I was younger, people at school all wanted to be my friend because I’m a little bit different and children quite like that. But as I got older, by 14 or 15 they didn’t want to be with me anymore. At the time I didn’t really realise I’d become socially isolated because I was concentrating on my studies.

I felt like, socially, there was nothing out there for people like me and I didn’t have the confidence to go out and get a job. So I decided to set up CP Teens UK. I wanted to connect other people who, like me, just felt a little bit lost and to tell them that they’re not the only people out there who feel isolated.

It made me feel less alone

At first, I just set up a Twitter account because I was a bit bored! I thought it was going be something I would get tired of after a week and never log back on. However, I woke up the next morning to find that people like Francesca Martinez and Sophie Christiansen were followers!

Other young people were getting in touch saying “I’m a teenager too and I feel the same way, it’s so nice to find someone else.” I got so many emails like that I couldn’t believe it. So I just kept going. I set up a website and then a Facebook page and it just kind of grew.

I just thought it was me feeling that way so it was really nice to know I was helping other people through my own experiences. It made me feel less alone. I’ve met some really cool people too and I even hear from people overseas.

Ellie smiles with a London skyline behind her
Ellie Simpson, founder of CP Teens UK

I want it to be for everybody

CP Teens UK has an online service so people can connect and chat. We have social get-togethers and we do a ball every year. Teenagers and young people from across the UK come together. It’s really nice. We have a RaceRunning club which is really good and we also have partnerships with some fantastic charities, including CP Sport and Accessible Derbyshire.

I get a lot of parents contacting me who have young children who’ve just been diagnosed, so I’ve set up another part of CP Teens called CP Tinies and CP Tweens. It covers 0 to 13 years and children can get involved too. I want it to be for everybody.

In my gap year, I got into Paralympic sport and it just changed my life so much. I started to wonder how many other young people like me think they can’t do sports.

Sport can really change lives

Now that I’ve finished my university degree in Sport Development with Coaching, I work on CP Teens UK full-time. I also have a part-time role with Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreation Association as a Sport Development Officer, particularly working on the development of RaceRunning.

In March, CP Teens UK received full charitable status and we’ve just moved into an office at the local football club. It is amazing to see how much it has grown and continues to grow. I am beyond excited for the future of CP Teens UK!

Ellie, a young disabled woman, races on an adapted tricycle on a racing track
Ellie competes in RaceRunning

I get so many emails from people saying “because of CP Teens I’m much more confident and I’ve done this and that”. I can remember, before CP Teens UK, thinking I was the only person on the planet with cerebral palsy. I think it’s important to let people know that they’re not alone.

Sport can really change lives. Before I was involved in sport, I avoided it at all costs and I most definitely did not see it as ‘life changing’. As well as it changing my life, it has also enhanced my life in so many different ways. I now don’t know where I would be without sport and RaceRunning!

To get involved with CP Teens UK and find out more about Ellie, visit the CP Teens UK website.

As part of our mission for everyday equality, we are going to be running a ‘Sport For All’ series to encourage better representation of disability in sport, as well as challenging attitudes towards disability. Find out how you can get involved with Sport For All. 

Read more Sport For All blogs

Let’s celebrate a summer of sport for all

There has been a definite buzz of excitement in the Scope office as London hosted the World Para Athletics Championships. Over a thousand athletes from over 85 countries competed and it was clear everyone was behind them. The event boasted the largest audiences in world Para sport championship history outside of the Paralympic Games.

Our athletes won a staggering 39 medals, placing Great Britain third in the medal table.  #TeamScope were cheering them on all the way. If you missed out on the buzz, check out what was happening during the event over on Twitter.

It’s not over yet

The event may have drawn to a close, but there’s still work to be done.

Last year, disabled people told us they felt attitudes towards them had begun to change after London 2012. 72% believed the games had helped to lift the negative attitudes they all too often experience. However, they also told us that over half of them regularly experienced discrimination.

A group of Scope staff standing outside the Olympic stadium in London
Some of Team Scope at the Olympic Stadium

#SportForAll

As part of our mission for everyday equality, we are going to be running a ‘Sport For All’ series to encourage better representation of disability in sport, as well as challenging attitudes towards disability.

You can expect new research, blogs, videos and social media events. These will showcase some of the best athletes and storytellers involved in disability sport today.

To get you started, read Sascha Kindred’s blog on how he thinks disability sport can help combat negative attitudes.

How you can get involved

Tell us what sport means to you

If you’re a disabled person, let us know what sport means to you. Just tweet us (@scope) with a photo, video or tweet using the hashtag #SportForAll.

Like, comment and share

There will be loads of exciting content coming your way so make sure you stay tuned, like, comment and share! Look out for video and blog content on our social media channels, our blog and in the ‘Everybody’ series on Huffington Post.

Make a difference

Support us fundraisers this year in accessible events such as The Superhero Triathlon and Parallel London. Find out more about our full list of challenge events.

It’s clear that sport has the power to bring us together and sporting events have the power to change people’s attitudes.

However, we all have the power to ensure that disability is celebrated and championed all year round, not just during events like the World Para Athletics Championships or the Paralympics.