Tag Archives: Training

Could you be part of the next generation of disability campaigners?

We are looking for aspiring young campaigners to join Scope for Change, our campaign training programme for disabled people aged 18 to 25. It’s a free, six-month programme, and no previous campaigning experience is needed. Find out more and apply to take part.

Disabled people face many barriers to equality – whether it’s negative attitudes, unnecessary extra costs, inaccessible environments or a lack of support in education or work. But we know that it doesn’t have to be this way, and that young disabled people have the drive and skills to help make change happen.

We first launched the Scope for Change programme in 2016 to support young disabled people gain the skills and confidence to campaign on issues they cared about . This first group of campaigners set out to tackle a variety of issues: encouraging museums to be more autism-friendly, making British Sign Language lessons at university more accessible and affordable, gaining step-free access to local transport, and raising awareness of hidden impairments.

Ellie, who took part in 2016, campaigned for greater accessibility at nature reserves. Here’s what she had to say about her campaign:

“I want to further educate those working in the conservation sector to make sites of natural interest as accessible as possible: providing ramps up to bird hides, having blue badge parking spaces, braille or audio information boards, allowing assistance dogs, and accessible toilets… Opening up the senses in particular for those with profound and multiple disabilities is so important – and where better to do that than a national park?”

It wasn’t just their campaigns that benefited – many of the group said that being part of Scope for Change gave them a sense of solidarity with other disabled people and boosted their confidence. No longer feeling like they were working alone, the campaigners could collaborate, share experiences and learn from each other.

Why get involved?

Now Scope for Change is back for a new generation, to tackle more obstacles on the road to everyday equality. We want disabled young people to be empowered to make decisions about their lives, influence change, and make real progress in their communities and wider society.

Over a six-month period, we will support the Scope for Change group to plan, launch and their own campaigns to make change on the issues that matter to them. This will be backed up with ongoing support from Scope staff and a three-day residential training event to learn all the skills needed to create a winning campaign strategy.

Does this sound like the opportunity for you? Apply for Scope for Change now – applications close on Monday 28 May.

A driver wouldn’t let me on the bus. When I complained, they offered me a job – #100days100stories

Guest post by Jean from London. Jean has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a painful condition which means she is prone to muscle tears and dislocated joints. She uses a wheelchair most of the time. Jean is an active campaigner for disability rights. She is sharing her story as part of our 100 days, 100 stories campaign.

At the beginning of 2013, I had to put a complaint in to a London bus company because a driver refused to deploy the ramp and let me on.

Instead of dismissing my complaint, the company actually asked me to go in and speak to the management about how disabled passengers should be treated.

Then they asked me to go in again and speak to the bus drivers – and after a couple of months they said, “How would you feel about us paying you for it?”

Jean holding the catBefore that, I hadn’t been able to work for seven years. Part of the time this was because I was unwell, but for a lot of the time it was because employers weren’t prepared to support my needs or make adaptations.

A couple of places I applied even offered to give me an interview, but then withdrew the offer because their offices weren’t wheelchair accessible. It was ridiculous.

Getting support

My new bosses have been really supportive, even offering to contribute towards a new reclining wheelchair, which I will need at work.

However, when I applied for funding from Access to Work for a support worker and a better wheelchair, I was rejected.

One of their reasons was that I wouldn’t be working enough hours, and would still need to claim benefits. But how am I supposed to build up my hours, and start to come off benefits, without the right level of support and equipment?

At the moment, my fiancé has to take me to work and act as my carer. It is difficult – we find it hard to balance his being my partner and being my employee. When he doesn’t do things how I want them, it feels very hard to tell him so.

Add in his own health issues, and wanting to pursue his own interests which have to constantly be put on a back burner, and it causes conflict in our private time.

I felt this was unfair so I appealed, and with the help of my MP I was successful in getting funding. I’m now in the process of finding a support worker, and Access to Work also paid towards the cost of the wheelchair and a small travel allowance.

My work

I’ve looked at how the company views and treats disabled passengers, and made some recommendations for improvements.

I’ve also run disability awareness training for bus drivers. We simulate various impairments – such as being blind or mobility impaired – and ask staff to try to move around inside the bus while it is in motion. It demonstrates how difficult travelling can be for disabled passengers.

I go to conferences and events, and we do a lot of work with mental health and learning disability charities.

One thing I’ve noticed is that disabled people will come and speak to me because they see me in a wheelchair. The fact that I have an understanding of what their situation might be seems to make a big difference.

My work is challenging, fun and rewarding, and it brings confidence and self-worth. I feel like I’m contributing something and making an improvement. Even though the majority of my income is still benefit-based, I am hoping that I can slowly build up my hours.

My employers saw something in me and built a new role around my abilities, and are investing quite heavily in me to ensure I have everything I need to fulfil my potential. I love it.

Read the rest of the stories in our 100 days, 100 stories campaign.

Are you 10-18 years old? Want to change something in your community?

Scope is offering the opportunity for young disabled people (aged 10-18 years old) to learn campaigning skills so that their voices may be heard in their communities. To achieve this, the Community Campaigns Team will be holding training sessions in London in May and June.

These events will give you the chance to learn new campaign skills and tools, and to hear from other people who have been able to make life better for disabled people and others in their community.

The events will be held from 10.30 – 3.30 on the following dates:

  • Saturday 10 May
  • Saturday 24 May
  • Saturday 7 June

At Scope, 6 Market Road, London, N7 9PW.

If you’re a young disabled person aged 10 to 18 and you want to change people’s attitudes towards disability and improve the way disabled people can get involved in the life of your community, please come along.

The events are free to attend and we will provide you with lunch and cover the cost of your transport.

These first sessions will be held in London but we will be delivering a similar programme later in the year in other parts of the country.
To find out more about how you can take part and book your place please email YourCampaigns@Scope.org.uk or phone Rosemary Frazer, on 0207 619 7718.

Better sleep for disabled children

Guest post from Emma Sweet from Scope’s sleep team.

Emma holding a sign which says - Desperate for a good night's sleep? Ask me anythingThanks to everyone asked questions during our sleep question-and-answer session on Facebook. We had a big response.

We run workshops which cover all the basics in addressing sleep problems and provide a toolkit to address your child’s sleep problems. Our workshops are for 10 professionals and 10 parents. If you’re interested in booking, email sleep@scope.org.uk.

Tips for tackling sleep problems

Boy sleepingI hope you can join us for one of our training sessions. In the meantime, here are some of my tips you might like to try for dealing with sleep problems:

  1. Certain foods can help at bedtime – 1 hour before bed – like bananas and warm milk. Food and drinks with colouring or sweeteners can affect a child’s ability to settle at bedtime.
  2. Some children use bedtime as an attention seeking exercise, attention, good or bad, is all attention to a child. Children are clever, and find some amazing distraction techniques to avoid going to bed.
  3. Some children are lacking a routine at night time or haven’t learnt appropriate behaviour at bedtime. Visual clues and consistency are key for all children. Children with learning difficulties may not understand why or when they need to go to sleep.
  4. Addressing sleep problems is exhausting for all the family, but given time, patience, and support they are many approaches that will help.
  5. Older children and teenagers naturally experience a shift in their body clock, meaning they want to go to sleep later and get up later. Modern technology impacts on this even further.
  6. Many disabled children need moving and repositioning in the night, if you do this near the time of one of their natural night wakings they are more likely to wake up. You need to work out when they are in a deep sleep so if you do it then they are less likely to wake.
  7. If your child suffers with anxiety, the physical symptoms of anxiety will impact on their sleep. Try doing anxiety exercises at the beginning of your bedtime routine.
  8. Many people think sleep problems are linked to a child’s impairment. This is not always the case – there are many causes of sleep problems which need to be explored.
  9. Research has shown that using a behavioural programme to address sleep disorders can help almost all children. However it can take longer to see improvements if a child has a neurological condition.

More about Scope’s sleep support for families and professionals.

“It’s like baby steps, one step after another” – Michael’s story

Landing your first “proper” job is tough for many young people in the UK. For 19-year-old Michael, having a learning disability has made that challenge all the harder. After a disrupted education, the East Londoner left school without his GCSEs and with his confidence badly dented. But everything started to change for Michael when Scope’s First Impressions, First Experiences programme set him up with a work placement at London Overground. 

Michael's face, smiling
Scope’s First Impressions, First Experiences programme gave Michael the confidence to begin his dream career.

When I was in school my confidence was knocked. I was diagnosed with my condition in year eight. I was diagnosed because I had problems with my attendance. My mum thought I might have a bit of a learning disability because she works with kids herself. The day I was diagnosed with autism I felt a whole lot of relief.

I thought that without many skills and GCSEs it wasn’t going to be worth applying for things like apprenticeships. I thought I had no chance. Before I came to Scope I thought to myself I wasn’t going to get anywhere. But from day one at the course things started to look better.

When I first started the course, I was down in general and didn’t have much self-confidence. I couldn’t see how I’d get to where I wanted to be. I’ve always had a passion for transport, and working on buses was my dream job.

Getting my first work experience 

First thing in 2013 I got the news that London Overground wanted me – brilliant. When I started with London Overground at the end of January, things picked up a lot more.

The Scope course dramatically improved my confidence and filled that gap that was holding me back. It gave me the chance to do work experience with London Overground, where I helped and assisted passengers with tickets and travel enquiries at Surrey Quays station. This work experience helped me to think “I can do this” and gave me a more positive outlook on life.

Now, I’m working part time at Stagecoach as a Customer Assistant on the number 15 bus route from Tower Hill to Trafalgar Square. I check tickets, offer travel advice to customers, supervise the platform and assist passengers with getting on and off the bus safely. I really love my job and I’m hoping that it will help me to achieve my dream of becoming a bus driver. Without First Impressions, First Experiences, I don’t think I’d be here.

A new outlook on life

I’ve always got a smile on my face and I’m cheery with customers. When they see that, they are more likely to have a chance of being a bit happier. Even a “good morning” or a “hello” makes someone feel a bit cheered up.

It’s like baby steps, one step after another. One step at a time is always the best policy and disabled people should be entitled to work no matter if it’s in an office or what.

When it comes down to it, go for it, no matter what way you take, you are going to get where you want to be.

Find out more about the First Impressions, First Experiences work training.

Can I give more? The answer is usually yes.

For the past few months I have been writing blog posts to showcase the amazing grit and determination of our event participants as they’ve supported Scope by taking on marathons, triathlons and extreme bike rides.

Now it’s time to turn the spotlight on myself. I want to tell you about my personal running experience; the highs, the lows, and my motivation to pick up a pair of trainers again. The quote in the title is from Paul Tergat, a Kenyan professional marathon runner. I’ve found myself relating to him a lot recently!

The pledge

Back in April I made a promise to our director of fundraising, Alan Gosschalk, that at some point this event season I would get involved in a Scope challenge event. It’s almost a rite of passage in the events team.

Conveniently for me, my pledge went forgotten for some time. That was until we met our Ironman UK participants in Bolton in August. I told them it would be a walk in the park and that they would enjoy the whole experience – which made me feel like a total fraud!

I remembered my promise and decided it was time to stick to my word. That evening I signed up for my first ever 5K run.

These shoes were made for running…

I begun my training routine in earnest using the NHS couch to 5K training plan. I had seven weeks to make sure I would get round the course without stopping.

I decided to invest in a decent pair of running trainers after having gait analysis at a top running shop. Gait analysis is a system where the motion of your feet is analysed to make sure your get the correct footwear. This involves running on a treadmill at three different speeds whilst a staff member watches the angle of your feet.

I managed the 5K distance in training, and was aiming to improve my speed. But two days before my run disaster struck! On my last training run, I couldn’t even complete 500 metres. My shins were in agony. I hobbled home in tears, upset that my weeks of hard work had come to this.

But after talking to my brother – who was doing the run with me – I was determined to carry on. I thought the pain was caused by shin splints, pain and swelling in the lower legs as a result of my body not being used to running.

Race day

A hilly running route
A challenging course

On the day I turned up to Leeds Castle near Maidstone in Kent ready to give it my all. I hadn’t done my research on the course and was shocked when I was faced with a cross-country, hilly route. I had only trained on the roads in suburban London!

There was no time to worry about that though. The klaxon went and my adrenaline kicked in. Thankfully, my brother stayed with me the whole way, chatting to me non-stop and helping to keep my mind off the pain.

Sarah Bowes after completing a 5K run
Happy after completing my first 5K

We crossed the finish line in exactly 37 minutes and I was thrilled! It took a good 48 hours to wipe the huge smile from my face and I was incredibly proud that I had actually done it, bursting into tears of exhilaration.

It may not be the quickest time but I know that my efforts in training and fundraising would make a big difference to the cause I was supporting.

The future?

Eight and a half weeks ago I couldn’t run the 200m from my house to the top of the road and I’m more determined than ever not to get in that state again. My doctor confirmed that the pain in my legs is shin splints so I have three weeks off from running, dancing or jumping to recover.

But I will be back to running as soon as I can. I know 5km is not the longest of distances but for me it was a big personal challenge that I managed to overcome.

My brother and I are already looking to do another 5K before Christmas. My aim for 2014 is to get a minute a month off my 5K time by pushing myself like Paul Tergat. When I can comfortably do a 30 minute 5K I will increase my distance and go for 10K. Watch this space!

If my story has encouraged you to get up off the couch, take a look at what Scope event you could get involved in next year.

Will you catch “the running bug”?

Like many of us, Ellen O’Donohoe was more likely to put her feet up on an evening then get out and go for a run. But that all changed when she caught the ‘running bug’ from her housemate and in just three weeks time Ellen will be running her first ever half marathon for Scope at Run to the Beat. Like many of our participant’s, Ellen’s motivations for signing-up with Scope are personal – here’s her story documenting her training, injuries and fundraising over the past few months:

I was never very sporty growing up. I was always happier reading a book rather than playing sports. I surprised myself by getting into running. I was looking for a way to exercise (to lose some weight, if I’m honest) and decided that sticking to an exercise routine would be easier with a friend so I began joining my housemate who liked to run. It took a while, and I didn’t see it happening, but I grew to love running.

A tough Winter

Even so, earlier this year, during the bitterly cold winter months, I was finding it harder and harder  to go running. I decided to sign up for a race, something I’ve never done before,  so that I would have something to work towards. Running for charity made sense to me because I knew it would help to keep me motivated. My cousin had cerebral palsy and knowing of the support that Scope provides to people like her made me want to raise money for them.

The highs and lows of training

I started training right away, I had a long way to go from my two-three miles every week. I steadily increased the miles I was doing and was very proud the first time I reached 10K. Something I never would have believed I could do just a few years ago. Unfortunately, I pushed too hard and pulled a calf muscle. It was so frustrating. I was unable to run for six weeks!

Ellen's Colleagues Limbering Up for their Bleep Test

During that time I focused on fundraising instead. I organised a sponsored bleep test at work and convinced a few colleagues to join me. I planned it well in advance so my leg had time to heal (although it was close) five racers took part, including myself, and together we raised nearly £80.

Ellen's relieved finishers!A dash to the confidence

To help with my training and to get me used to the race atmosphere I signed up for a shorter race. I agreed to be part of a relay team for the Upton Tri in July, running 10k. It happened to fall on one of the hottest days of the year. By the time I was due to run my section the temperature had already reached 30 degrees. It was horrible. I made it half way around before the heat got the better of me and forced me to walk/run the rest. It took me a long time to reach the finish line, so much longer than I hoped. I finished the race disheartened, wishing I could have done better and worried about what this might mean for the race in September.

A little over a week later, I ran 10 miles for the first time in training. It did wonders for my confidence. It was such a difference from my practice race. For the first time I felt that no matter what happened, I would be able to make it across the finish line.

Injury free until race day?

As far as fundraising goes, my friends and family have been very generous. I still have a little way to go to reach my target but I’m hopeful I’ll make it. For now, I’m keeping my fingers crossed that I will stay injury free until race day. Despite all the ups and downs that I now know comes with training I hope, that by race day, I will be strong enough and prepared enough to run the whole 13.1 miles.

If you’d like to sponsor Ellen and help her reach her fundraising goal then do visit her online giving page. We’ll be there on race day to cheer Ellen and our other Team Scope runners along the Run to the Beat course – if you’d like to be there with us then please do volunteer by emailing us at events@scope.org.uk. Or why not take on your own challenge for Scope?