Tag Archives: videos

Scope’s 100th film launched – our top 5 favourites to date

2014 was the most successful year yet for film content from Scope. Our videos played a big part in some of our most high profile work to date in things like End The Awkward and Strip For Scope. Along the way we also achieved some fantastic things too.

We now have well over 1,000 subscribers to our YouTube channel. We screened some of our films in cinemas around the country for the first time. We produced our first content in British Sign Language and in audio description versions. We also released our 100th film at the end of the year.

To celebrate, we put together a list of our top five favourite films to date.

  1. End the Awkward – In the office

    495,586 views
    This film is one of the three main adverts for our End The Awkward campaign. Star Alex Brooker couldn’t stop laughing at the funny expression on the actor playing the male office worker’s face. The actor was probably less amused as it meant he had to maintain that awkward expression on his face for half a day.

  2. Strip For Scope

    152,675 views
    This film has the dubious honour of being the first Scope film to feature any sort of nudity – but hopefully you’ll agree that it was done tastefully. Jack Eyers, the male model who features in the film, didn’t allow himself to eat or drink across the day of the shoot in order to maintain the look of his physique.

  3. What is the social model of disability?

    25,913 views
    This film might also have featured silly faces and nudity if Mik Scarlet, who features in the film, had had his way, but thankfully we talked him out of it on the day of the shoot. (Just kidding, Mik.) Thankfully instead, we have perhaps one of the most interesting films Scope has produced to date. It features prominent disabled people discussing the social model of disability – and what it means to them.

  4. Cycle Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 for Scope

    3,830 views
    Scope are really excited to be the official charity partner for the famous Prudential RideLondon-Surrey 100 bike race. This film doesn’t even go half of the way to illustrating how awful the conditions were on the day in 2014, so a massive thanks again to all our cyclists and cheerers on the day!

  5. About Scope

    5,015 views
    Last and by no means least is our new film all about Scope and our work in England and Wales. We didn’t want to produce a slick, flashy promotional film so this film was shot in a “selfie”-style across a year at locations all over the country by disabled people themselves, along with support from Scope volunteers and staff.

So what was your favourite Scope film from 2014? Let us know in the comments below.

We’ve got some really exciting projects coming up in 2015, so if you want to be the first to see our content before everyone else, please take a minute to subscribe to our YouTube channel.

MMA is a physical sport, we’re not baking cookies in there – #100days100stories

100 shttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFOKAFe0UXU

Seventeen-year-old Jack says he took up mixed martial arts (MMA) – which combines elements of kickboxing, wrestling and jujitsu – three years ago for “the wrong reasons”.

Jack has cerebral palsy and was getting bullied at school for being the “fat disabled kid”. He wanted to do something to boost his confidence, so he started boxing with some friends.

“But then a couple of weeks into doing the boxing, my coach turned out to be an MMA coach as well, and started teaching us some ground game”, explains Jack.

“Then from that I’ve just been doing MMA ever since.”

The right side of Jack’s body is a lot weaker than his left and he has limited use of his right hand – but Jack fights confidently against able-bodied men, often much older and bigger than he is.

Three years since taking on the full contact combat sport Jack is leaner, stronger and more confident.

Jack trains with a coach three times a week for three hours and does extra training during the week. His hard work pays off – Jack often wins fights and has the titles and trophies to prove it.

“Cerebral palsy has given me the determination to never give up and I think that if I didn’t have this disability, I wouldn’t even like MMA – I would be too scared to do it.”

Jack running
Jack in training

Jack’s determination does come at a price: “MMA is a physical sport with a physical consequence – you can’t come into this sport not wanting to get hurt – we’re not baking cookies in there.”

“I can’t tell you how many times I’ve broken my nose, I’ve been knocked out five times I think, and I’ve had black eyes, I’ve had busted lips.”

Jack is sure he’s the only disabled MMA fighter in the UK – and aims to be the first physically disabled MMA fighter in the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).

“Being in the UFC would mean everything. I may never get to the point where I am a champion, (but) I’m gonna give it my best try. It would mean I’ve made it, it would mean I’ve proved everyone wrong – everyone that’s said I can’t.”

“Someone said, ‘those who say they can, and those who say they can’t – they’re both right, because those who say they can’t give up, and those that say they can, strive and they make it.”

Now, Jack doesn’t worry about bullies: “After a couple of months (of doing MMA) I realised that I just needed to chill out.”

“There are going to be people in the world that are just idiots, they have no idea what they’re on about, they throw the word spastic around like it’s funny, and it’s not.”

Find out more about 100 days, 100 stories and read the rest of our stories so far

My little sister, who happens to have Down’s syndrome

Agi Kolaczynska (11) has been making films about her little sister, who has Down’s syndrome, since she was eight. Here she talks about film-making, changing attitudes about Down’s syndrome and what sparked off her ‘My Little Sister’ project.

I have been an enthusiastic filmmaker since I got my first camera on my sixth birthday, and have taken it everywhere with me ever since, filming and taking photographs of everything – and I mean everything.

When I was eight, my mum found a great new website called Netbuddy (which is now part of Scope) who were running a short film competition. She suggested I make a film about what it’s like being Magdalena’s sister. The deadline was that night, so I engrossed myself in editing a year’s-worth of footage I’d taken of me and Magdalena. I called it My Little Sister (who happens to have Down’s syndrome) and uploaded it to Netbuddy.

My film won the competition, and I started getting lovely messages and feedback from all over the world. People were asking me “when is the next one coming out?” and I thought wouldn’t it be be fun to make this into a lifelong project. So, I made a website and started blogging about our lives together. The film – which now has 23K views on YouTube – became the first episode of “My Little Sister (who happens to have Down’s syndrome)”. It now has ten episodes in total, with more to come.

Changing perceptions of Down’s syndrome

From the feedback I was getting, I could see my films were changing what people thought about Down’s syndrome. They were encouraging other families to feel good about the future. As I got older I experienced some of the stereotyped ideas people have about Down’s syndrome, and how hurtful these could be to Magdalena and the people who loved her. This made me want to make more films to show the world all the magical moments we shared, and the parts of Magdalena’s character they would see if they looked beyond the Down’s syndrome.

As I heard other people’s stories and experiences of how hard it had been for people with Down’s syndrome in the past, I felt even more strongly about the need to stand up for my sister and other people with Down’s syndrome. I started getting messages from people who knew nothing about Down’s syndrome or had had a completely different view before they had watched my films. Others started asking questions about Down’s syndrome. People were writing to me from all around the world and featuring my films on their blogs in Spain, America, Morocco and loads of other places.

The National Youth Film Festival Awards

Last Autumn I submitted my films to the National Youth Film Festival Awards and was amazed when, a few weeks later, I received a phone call saying I’d been shortlisted for the ‘Ones To Watch award.’ This award was to honour young people with “exceptional talent and ambition in film.” It felt amazing to be recognised for doing something I loved.

An invitation followed to attend the Gala Award Ceremony at the Vue Cinema in Leicester Square. So we trooped down to London, not really knowing what to expect. It was very glitzy, like the Oscars, with actors and producers and golden envelopes with the winners names in. As the winners walked on stage to be presented with their award, their images were blown up huge on the cinema screen.

To be honest, I felt overwhelmed as I had never experienced anything like it before. I didn’t expect to be called on stage, as I didn’t expect to win, but suddenly I heard my name called up, and I had won! Jim Carter from Downton Abbey presented me with my award and I really enjoyed meeting the other young filmmakers, hearing about their projects and asking people what films they liked watching.

Winning the award has made me determined to learn more, and this year I am going to think about how to get access to better equipment, training and a better website. Most of all, I will carry on enjoying spending time with my sister and making movies.

Check out Agi’s blog and website  See Agi on YouTube and follow her on Facebook

Top 5 videos challenging attitudes to disability in 2013

As the year draws to a close, we’ve been looking back at the videos which got people talking about disability in 2013. Here are our top 5.

What have we missed? Let us know in the comments below.

#BornRisky Alternative Voices

Channel 4 recruited five people with communication difficulties to join their continuity team in December.  “An estimated 2.5 million people in the UK have some kind of communication impairment. We want to give them a platform and normalise the presence of disabled people on TV by adding fresh, representative voices to the rich diversity of our existing pool of announcers.” Find out more about the campaign and read our guest post from one of the announcers.

Five-year-old signs for parents

Claire Koch from America got the internet smiling when she was filmed enthusiastically signing for her deaf parents during her school Christmas carol performance so that they could fully enjoy it. The film has now been viewed by over 6.3 million people.

Britain’s Got Talent

Jack Carroll, a 14 year old with cerebral palsy, made it all the way to the Britain’s Got Talent final with his unique stand-up comedy style. Unfortunately he didn’t win, but with over 7.1 million views, we’re sure he has a great future in comedy ahead of him.

Guinness advert

A recent Guinness advert has received over 7.8 million views. It’s shows a group playing wheelchair basketball with a great twist at the end. See it for yourself.

People with disabilities react to mannequins

Pro Infirmis, a Swiss disability advocacy organisation created this video showing disabled mannequins as part of their campaign for International Day for People with Disabilities. This beautiful video has received over 8.4 million views.

Here at Scope we’ve been busy creating some fantastic videos too. Our videos about a young disabled girl’s experiences of bullying and of a mother sharing her experiences of caring for two autistic sons shocked many and prompted others to share their own similar stories. We met some inspiration people like Jamie who attended our school in Wales and Brett who ran the Brighton Marathon whilst pushing his son in a wheelchair! We’ve been supported by a number of celebrities; Arabella Weir and Rory Kinnear helped us talk about fostering disabled children; our Britain Cares video was voiced by Stephen Fry; and Paralympian Sophie Christiansen spoke to us about the Paralympics legacy