Tag Archives: visual impairment

“My guide dog isn’t a sat nav!”

Guest blog by Emily Davison, otherwise known as Fashioneyesta. Emily is a Scope for Change campaigner and stars in our new End the Awkward film made with UNILAD.

My name’s Emily Davison, otherwise known as Fashioneyesta. I’m a university graduate, writer, fashion and beauty blogger and YouTuber. I also happen to be visually impaired and work with a Guide Dog.

Every day I come across many misconceptions towards my disability and in turn I usually find myself in front of my camera or typing away at my laptop discussing these with my followers.

I was keen to take part in Scope’s End the Awkward campaign – to represent the sight loss community and to show that sight loss does not equate to ignorance, being un-fashionable or being stereotyped.

You can’t give my guide dog directions!

In my new film, you see me in an awkward situation around one of the most outlandish myths surrounding my guide dog – which is the common belief that people can give her directions instead of myself, and that she can follow them like a GPS system!

But, of course there are plenty more awkward moments where that one came from…

‘You’re well dressed for a blind person’

As a fashion blogger, comments I hear a lot are to do with my appearance. People will say ‘you don’t look blind!’ or ‘you’re very well dressed for a blind person.’

As if anyone with a visual impairment – simply because they lack sight – cannot have a conception of style, beauty or looking good, which is of course not true.

‘She’s blind and she’s wearing high heels!’

Another one I encounter on a regular basis is ‘Oh my god! She’s blind and she’s wearing high heels, how ridiculous!’ My answer to this is what does sight loss have to do with the clothes I wear? In what context do those two things relate?

I chose to take an interest in fashion because I enjoy the shopping process, I enjoy looking and feeling good and I happen to love wearing high-heeled shoes.

Awkward speed dating

Another time I went speed dating, and after talking to the person opposite me for a few minutes I got onto the subject of being visually impaired.

When I told him about my vision he sat back, blinked and said ‘Oh…Well what do you expect me do say to that?’ And the conversation came to an abrupt, very awkward end.

Young woman sitting on steps near a beach

‘But you don’t look blind…’

On the bus one day I sat on one of the priority seats – those usually reserved for disabled people, elderly people or those with child.

But my guide dog was out of view and therefore to some I could appear to be a ‘normal person’ – a term I use very loosely.

An elderly gentlemen boarded the bus and said to me ‘Can you move please! These seats are for disabled people.’

It just so happened that my stop was next and so instead of staring a brawl I got up to expose my little four-legged friend, in all her guide dog splendour (neon harness).

There was a deadly silence…..He then responded ‘Oh god! No sit back down… it’s…it’s just…you don’t look blind!’

We all make mistakes

Awkwardness is something I experience in my everyday life, we all do, but disability shouldn’t be something to feel awkward about.

If you have ever felt awkward around disabled people – maybe you said something wrong or made someone feel embarrassed – the thing to do is simply apologise.

We all make mistakes in life and as long as we move forward and learn from them, this is what truly matters.

Follow Fashioneyesta

If you would like to keep up to date with my work you can find me on my blog, Twitter and YouTube. And don’t forget to share your awkward stories too as part of End the Awkward.

He’s the Paralympic hopeful who’s taking the athletic world by storm – Souleyman

30 under 30 logo

This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Souleyman is a 16 year old runner. He’s visually impaired but that hasn’t held him back – it just means he needs to find a different way of doing things. He recently took part in the Junior Paralympics and won gold.

As part of our 30 Under 30 campaign, he spoke to us about his love of running and competing, overcoming barriers and how he’s working towards the 2020 Paralympics.

Ever since I was young I really enjoyed competing. I always used to win races in primary school. I enjoyed sports day, I enjoyed all kinds of races at the park with my friends and it turned into a passion. In year 7 at high school my teacher said “you have a talent, you should join a club”. So I joined a club and started getting better.

The British Athletics Paralympics selected me to do the School Games, which is also known as the Junior Paralympics. This was in November last year and I won gold. I’ve competed for my club, Kingston, but to be at a major championship, it was a great experience. And Brazil itself was cool. The sun was out all day, it was warm, the people were amazing, and the vibe was so good.

I didn’t expect to be at that level so to actually come away being the world number one was a huge shock. I knew I was decent but I didn’t know I was that good. All my family and my friends were so buzzed, they were like “You’re going to be the next Usain Bolt”. Another door has opened, and it’s just a case of seeing where that can go.

Souleyman on the running track, smiling at the camera, hands on hips

Getting to the 2020 Paralympics

Competing at the 2020 Paralympics in Tokyo is my main goal. My coach and I sat down and made a plan of what we’re going to do, how we’re going to get there. Before then there are championships like the Europeans, Commonwealth and World Championships – all these other competitions that I can compete at.

Wherever you hear “Olympics” you also hear “Paralympics” so there’s been a huge shift. It’s being acknowledged in society and people are seeing that disabled people can do the same things that non-disabled people can do. They just need to do it in a different way.

Souleyman running on the track

Overcoming challenges and attitudes

The way my visual impairment works – I can’t see through one eye, and the other eye is tunnel vision, so I don’t see what’s around me in my peripheral vision. It makes it hard to stay in my lane and see who’s next to me and how fast I should be running. I can see straight ahead, which is good for the 100m. But you need to see who’s beside you to judge your pace. It is very difficult in all areas of life.

People’s attitudes are quite frustrating. For some reason they think because I have a visual impairment or a disability I’m not cognitively able to do things. I’m not stupid, I just can’t see! I’m a huge believer in whatever you can imagine for yourself, you can achieve it. It’s about finding what needs to be overcome. Especially with me, with my visual impairment, I’ve never thought there’s something I can’t do. I can do it, but I have to find an alternative way of doing it.

Souleyman laughing and pouring a bottle of water over his head

Inspiring others

In athletics I want to achieve as much as possible. Whether it’s winning gold, getting a world record or being a role model for other people. After I won at the School Games in Brazil, visually impaired people and disabled people contacted me and said “It’s amazing what you’ve achieved as a young disabled person and you’ve inspired me” which is something I never thought I’d hear. That just made me want to push harder.

Souleyman is sharing his story as part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Read more from our #30toWatch on our website.

“You’re very well dressed for a blind person” Fashioneyesta, the fashion blogger

30 under 30 logo

This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Emily Davison, also known as Fashioneyesta, is a Master’s Degree Student, Journalist, Writer, YouTuber and Blogger. She also happens to be visually impaired and works with a Guide Dog. Emily’s goal is to change perceptions of disability with her writing and love for making videos.

At 4pm today, Emily is doing a Facebook Live video Q and A. She’ll be talking and answering questions about fashion and beauty, writing, vlogging, attitudes and more. Here’s a little preview.

DSC_0126

As a fashion blogger, I get a lot of comments about my appearance

People will say “you’re very well dressed for a blind person.” As if anyone with a visual impairment – simply because they lack sight – cannot have a conception of style, beauty or looking good, which is of course not true.

Style is a form of expression and it depends on passion and imagination and not on your level of vision. As a visually impaired person I appreciate clothes from the fabrics and embroidery used, to the outline of the garment and how it makes me feel when I wear it. I interact with style based on a number of different senses.

There are many different visually impaired people, who appreciate clothes for their shape, quality and attention to detail. After all, fashion is a creative outlet and is not exclusive to one set of individuals.

 Young woman hugging her guide dog

Emily also starred in our awkward moments film introduced by Warwick Davis

Every day I come across many misconceptions towards my disability and in turn I usually find myself in front of my camera or typing away at my laptop discussing these with my followers.

I was keen to take part in Scope’s End the Awkward campaign – to represent the sight loss community and to show that sight loss does not equate to ignorance, being unfashionable or being stereotyped.

Emily would love to hear from you. Tune in to our Facebook page at 4pm with your questions at the ready!

Emily is part of our 30 Under 30 campaign. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Keep up to date with all of our new stories on our 30 under 30 page.

‘Are you blind, love?’ Why attitudes matter – #EndtheAwkward

Guest post from Elin Williams, a student from north Wales, who is visually impaired. In this post for our End the Awkward campaign, she talks about two different types of awkwardness she’s encountered.

Scope’s research shows that two-thirds of people feel awkward around disability, so when Emily Davison aka Fashioneyesta asked me to join in with Scope’s End the Awkward campaign, I couldn’t wait to get involved and share my own cringey moments…

‘Are you blind, love?’

A few years ago I was travelling alone on a train. I hadn’t long been travelling independently, and was still getting used to using my cane on a regular basis. Growing up, I always felt that the cane made me stand out and was reluctant to use it for fear of not looking ‘normal’.

Elin, a young woman, with her guide dog

So there I was. Along came the food and drinks trolley, and I plucked up the nerve to say ‘excuse me’ to flag the trolley down. I think this was the first time I’d ever done this – not being able to make eye contact or see people’s facial expressions has always made me  nervous of situations like this.

I asked the man pulling the trolley: ‘Do you have any drinks on this trolley?’

My inquiry was met with the scornful reply: ‘Ha! Are you blind, love?’

‘Well, yes,’ I said, lifting my folded cane from the seat next to me to show him.

The deathly silence that enveloped the passengers nearby let me know this encounter hadn’t gone unnoticed. I obviously couldn’t see how red he went, but considering the tremor in his voice, and how his hand shook when he dropped my change, I think he was a little embarrassed.

But he’d embarrassed me too. His smart-arse attitude made me feel so small and stupid.

A better experience

Only about a month ago, I and two other visually impaired friends had just got off a train and were standing outside the station, figuring out whether to get a taxi or to walk home. I had my guide dog Jazzy with me, while both my mates were using canes.University of Chester student Elin Williams aged 19 from Porthmadog with her guide dog Jazzy. Elin was born with a degenerative condition called Lebers Congenital Amaurosis and lost most of her vision when she was 15. A Welsh speaker, she is studying English Literature. Elin has written a first person story about her first year with Jazzy as a student.

A young guy came up to us and quite smugly said: ‘Did you have fun hiking today, guys?’

‘Those are some funky looking hiking sticks you have there,’ he elaborated, going on to ask us where exactly we’d been hiking, in Cambridgeshire, where there are no mountains…

It finally dawned on us that the guy had mistaken the canes for hiking sticks! We explained that we hadn’t been hiking, that we were blind and that they were our canes, whilst trying not to laugh along with his mates who’d witnessed his blunder.

Pointing to Jazzy, I added: ‘Yeah, she’s my hiking dog. I ride her up the mountains…!’

The poor guy was pretty embarrassed and very apologetic, but we reassured him that we weren’t offended.

It’s attitudes that make things awkward

From my experience, it’s much better to laugh at yourself and with others rather than get stressed out or touchy about silly mistakes.

Elin walking with her guide dog

What makes it awkward is when the perpetrator can’t laugh along with you, because they’re too mortified at having possibly offended you to see the funny side. It makes it much more awkward than if they’d just share the joke.

End the Awkward is a fantastic stepping-stone towards dispelling the taboo that surrounds disability, but I think it’s also important to remember that it starts with us as disabled people.

If you’re uncomfortable about your impairment and don’t know how to talk about it – and laugh about it – you can’t make others feel comfortable addressing it either.

A version of this story was first published on Elin’s blog, See My Way. Want to know more about ending the awkward? Watch our awkward short films, produced in partnership with Channel 4.

Photos courtesy of the Daily Post, north Wales.

“Everyone close your eyes so you know how Holly feels” – #EndTheAwkward

Holly is currently at university studying to become a teacher. She’s blind and writes a blog documenting her everyday experiences. Here she talks about some of her awkward moments as part of our #EndTheAwkward campaign.

Using a cane

I was using my cane around school, doing the usual left-to-right motions when I accidentally knocked someone with my cane. This person was in the same year as me and she started shouting and swearing at me in the corridor in front of others. I felt really embarrassed because it was an accident. This really did knock my confidence when using my cane and at one point I didn’t use it at all because I was so anxious. I have always felt that when using my long cane it makes me stand out so I don’t look “normal” so as you can imagine, this encounter really did have an effect on me.

“Everyone close your eyes so you know what it’s like to be blind”

It was my first day of year seven, and like everyone else I was very nervous because I was starting a new school and meeting new people. I had my first P.E lesson (I hated doing P.E) so I wasn’t really looking forward to it but I had to do it anyway.
Things were going well until one moment which changed everything. The teacher said to the class “everyone close your eyes and carry out this activity so you know what it’s like to be blind, and you know how Holly feels.” I felt embarrassed and upset and angry. Not only was this wrong, I also thought that people would just have that opinion of me, ‘the blind girl.’
I would just like to point out and say that this is not a representation or a true picture of what it’s like to be blind. Many people that are blind or severely sight impaired, including myself do have light perception or other vision.
The teacher did eventually apologise but this is something that I will always remember.

“She’s blind, she can’t sit there”

A few years ago I was going on holiday with my mum and dad and was pretty excited. We arrived at the airport to check-in etc and when it came to getting our seats, my mum and dad asked if we could sit near the front. The woman behind the desk simply told my parents “she’s blind so she can’t sit there.” They asked why and she didn’t really say. We came to some arrangement but then she said “Does she even have a passport?” Just because I’m blind why would I not have a passport? I’m just like everyone else. I felt quite self-conscious and embarrassed.
Also, why couldn’t she have asked me myself instead of asking my parents for me? Whenever this happens I do speak for myself all the time but it still makes me feel very awkward in situations like this.

You’re blind so how do you have an opinion?

I’ve come across many people that think just because I’m blind, I cannot have opinions or like things that everyone else can. I have often been asked this when I’ve been talking about a band or artist I like, or clothing for example. I’ve been asked when I’ve been on the way to a concert, “You don’t know what they look like so why are you going to see them live?” I do have other senses that I can use to determine my opinion!

How do you play an instrument?

I’ve been playing the flute since I was nine and have been in a band and taken part in many concerts. One thing I often get asked is “how do you play the flute when you’re blind?” I always say “just like you are doing. I learn in exactly the same way apart from the fact that I read braille music.” Disabled people can carry out normal activities just like any other person.

These are just a few of the awkward moments that I’ve experienced, they might not seem awkward to you but there’s so many more that I could include – I just had to select a few!

Personally I think that if you aren’t comfortable with your disability, can’t laugh about it or talk about it then it makes other people feel uncomfortable about it as well. If we share our experiences then we can raise awareness and help #EndTheAwkward

Find out more about our #EndTheAwkward campaign

“I think that’s an ice cream van, love!” #EndTheAwkward

Blogger and Youtuber Natalie has an eye condition called Congenital Nystagmus, sometimes described as ‘wobbly eyes’ or ‘dancing eyes’.

As part of our End the Awkward campaign, Natalie explains her ‘moody looks’ aren’t personal, and why she cringes every time she holds her arm out to wave down the bus…

Growing up, I used to think that if I tried to hide my disability things would be easier.

My visual impairment is not necessarily obvious to an onlooker; however situations that occur as a consequence of having poor vision can be quite noticeable.

Often, friends tell me I did not wave back at them and I explain it is because I had not seen them. With people who know me, they generally understand, though it can be embarrassing when people think I am just ignoring them.

The perils of waving down the bus

Four photos of Natalie doing different poses
Natalie writes a blog about life with a visual impairment

I’m registered partially sighted and getting off the bus at my stop and waving one down is quite challenging. Many times I have been waiting at a bus stop and the bus has just driven straight past.

One time I was waiting for the bus, I began to wave it over, but it didn’t slow down. As it passed in front of me, the lady next to me said ‘I think that’s an ice cream van love’.

Still waiting for my bus, a white van slowed down next to me and a guy popped his head out and said “alright darlin’, where can I take you to?” Obviously I politely declined the offer.

Shame the ice cream van didn’t stop as I could have done with an ice lolly waiting for the bloody bus!

But I do slightly cringe when I stick my arm out to flag down a bus because I’m not sure what I’m going to get.

The blind lollypop lady

A friend of mine, who is also visually impaired, said her bus company offered a ‘STOP’ sign for her to hold up while waiting for a bus.

Unsurprisingly she declined the offer and who could blame her? Would you like to hold a guide dog in one hand and in the other, a huge STOP sign?

My friend would have looked like a blind lollypop lady!

I’m not really grumpy

My facial expression can sometimes look like I’m really grumpy, often interpreted as ‘moody looks’.

Misunderstandings happen when I’m trying to focus on what I’m seeing, but I seem like I’m frowning with my eyes darting about due to Nystagmus.

So if you see me, I don’t wave back, I look at you with a frown and walk straight past, it is nothing personal, I’m just a VIP, a Visually Impaired Person!

Raising awareness and ending the awkward

I think the best thing to do in life is just keep trying. There might be awkward moments along the way but if you don’t try, you might not find what you are looking for.

These stories are not the half of what I’m dealing with as someone with a visual impairment. I hope that my sharing them some people might learn more about disability, a great place to start to #EndTheAwkward.

Through her blog, YouTube and social media, Natalie shares her world as a disabled person with a visual impairment and how this has influenced her love for art, healthy living and fashion.

Have you got an awkward tale to tell? Share your story with us.

Disability Innovations – iBeacons help blind people conquer the Tube

Disability Innovations is a blog series that gathers some of the most interesting new products and services that aim to make disabled people’s lives easier. We hope it will inspire more innovation in the disability field.

What is it?

We all love to talk about how stressful travel in London is – particularity on the underground. Our usual complaints (the sights, the smells, the tourists standing on the left) pale into insignificance when compared with the challenge of navigating the system with a visual impairment.

Wayfindr is an app that aims to help blind and visually impaired people to use the London Underground (LU) more easily and independently, by giving the user accurate audible directions as they make their way through the station. A trial has just been undertaken at Pimlico station, and the hope is that if successful it will be rolled out across the LU and other transport networks.

“When I tested the app at Pimlico last week for the first time it was awesome, it made me feel free.” Courtney, Royal London Society for Blind People (RLSB) Youth Forum member.

Who did it?

The project was born out of the Royal London Society for Blind People (RLSB) Youth Forum, which in March 2014 highlighted travel as a key issue. They collaborated with ustwo (a studio which builds digital products and services) to develop the Wayfindr app. After an initial trial RLSB and ustwo approached LU to see how they could use this technology.

How does it work?

Bluetooth ‘iBeacons’ transmit signals that are picked up by the Wayfindr app, which uses them combined with ustwo’s positioning technology to work out where the user is. From this information the user is given audible directions which guide them around the ticket hall, down stairs and escalators, and onto the platform.  Directions are received though bone-conduction headphones, which are unique as they allow users to continue to hear what’s going on around them.

Young visually impaired Londoners involved with the charity were involved in testing the Wayfindr app. Feedback was positive, with those who were initially insecure reporting feeling more confident at the end of the trial sessions. There were some constructive points that will be addressed in future trials, and more iBeacons would need to be put in place before it can be used more widely.

Check out RSLBs Wayfindr page and video for more information about the trial and how the technology works.

What’s the dream?

The results of the trial will inform how this technology could work on the underground, to help fulfil the ambition of standardising all this technology and make it seamless across the transport network. Ustwo are also aiming to try out Wayfindr with multiple modes of transport, using various technologies to complement beacons for more accurate navigation.

If it is rolled out, it would offer a simple way for thousands of people to navigate public transport, making a dramatic difference to visually impaired people’s lives.

Why we like it

This ground breaking trial has been driven directly by a group of young people and the real issues they face, and has been achieved through close collaboration between charity and private company. We love how this technology is being developed on an open basis, to allow other developers to take the technology forward and build apps that work with the beacons. We hope the results of the trial mean that this is adopted across the London Underground and that other transport providers are encouraged to invest in this area.

This blog is for information only. Scope does not endorse this product or service. We try to make sure our information is up to date and accurate at the time of publishing.

To tell us about a Disability Innovation, please email innovation@scope.org.uk.

Disability Innovations: App lets volunteers lend their eyes to assist visually impaired people

Disability Innovations is a blog series that gathers some of the most interesting new products and services that aim to make disabled people’s lives easier. We hope it will inspire more innovation in the disability field.

What is Be My Eyes?

Be My Eyes is an iPhone app that connects visually impaired people with volunteer helpers from around the world via live video chat. The app allows sighted volunteers to ‘lend’ their eyes to a visually impaired person to assist them with tasks such as navigating their surroundings and identifying food labels. Hans Jørgen Wiberg, the app’s inventor says that “being visually impaired myself I know the challenges blind people face. It’s my hope that by helping each other as an online community, Be My Eyes will make a big difference in the everyday lives of blind people all over the world.”

What’s the idea?

From his personal experience, and his work for the Danish Blind Society, Hans Jørgen learned first hand that as resourceful and independent as people with visual impairments are, everyone needs help once in a while! As a non-profit app, Be My Eyes hopes to provide that help by creating a community all about contributing to and benefiting from small acts of kindness.

The idea behind the app is simple. To ‘ask for help’ a visually impaired user touches a button to request the assistance of a volunteer (the app itself is designed around users using iPhone VoiceOver technology).  The sighted volunteer then receives a notification for help which they can either ignore or accept. If they accept, the app uses live video technology to enable the visually impaired user to direct the camera on their smart phone to stream an image of the object they need to see to the sighted volunteer’s phone. The volunteer can then describe the objects or surroundings, and answer questions such as ‘when is the use by date on this carton of milk?’ Requests for help can currently only be made between 7am and 10pm and sighted volunteers can earn points and promotions to new levels of experience, the more people they help.

The power of the crowd

Not only does the app itself make the most of ‘the power of the crowd’ to help its visually impaired users, but it is also uses a network of volunteers to contribute to the technical side of things! To date, the app has already been ‘crowd translated’ into over 34 languages, (a Crowd sourcing platform which allows volunteers to contribute and approve translations online). The app itself is also ‘open source’, which means that the source code or how the app is built in coding is freely available online, for anyone to access, use, change or distribute. Be My Eyes hope that in doing so, more talented people will have the chance to improve the apps software and to continue to develop it by contributing with new features or fixing bugs.

The app is free to download on iOS and an android version is in development.  Be My Eyes has gathered over 160,000 sighted volunteers and 16,000 visually impaired users to date (that’s 10 volunteers to every user) and has made over 56,000 ‘helping connections’ in more than 80 languages.

Why we like it

We think that Hans Jørgen’s idea of a network of ‘good Samaritans’ to help others is a really interesting take on the idea of the ‘shared economy’. Be My Eyes has the potential to make a real difference in helping disabled people to live more independently by offering a new type of flexible support on hand, as and when required. We also love how it uses technology to create micro volunteering opportunities in such an easy, and informal way- you could even be ‘volunteering’ during your commute!

This blog is for information only. Scope does not endorse this product or service. We try to make sure our information is up to date and accurate at the time of publishing.

To tell us about a Disability Innovation, please email innovation@scope.org.uk.

Disability Innovations: How bats can help visually impaired people cycle

Five cyclists in a line with UltraBike technology affixed to their bikes

Disability Innovations is a blog series that gathers some of the most interesting new products and services that aim to make disabled people’s lives easier. We hope it will inspire more innovation in the disability field.

What is the UltraBike?

If you have a visual impairment and want to cycle, your only real option right now is to ride a tandem with a sighted ‘pilot’, who can steer you and guide you . The UltraBike is a ‘kit’ that can be fixed to the handlebars of a bicycle to enable a visually impaired person to cycle independently.

How does the UltraBike work?

The UltraBike uses technology inspired by bats, who use ultrasonic hearing to avoid obstacles when moving around the dark.

The technology was originally applied to the UltraCane, a high-tech white cane for people with visual impairments. It emits ultrasonic sound waves, which bounce off objects and back to the cane. The cane then beeps and vibrates in response, to alert the user of the obstacle. Beeps and vibrations increase in frequency as the object gets closer.

The UltraBike kit is detachable and can be fixed to the front of any bike. It’s made up of two ultrasound sensors on the handlebars, which detect obstacles in the cyclist’s path, both in front and to either side of the bike. Then there are two ‘arms’ attached, one on each handle, containing “tractor” buttons. The cyclist places their thumbs on these buttons, which vibrate when the sensors detect obstacles. Sensors work up to 8 metres ahead, so can give the cyclist plenty of warning to change direction or stop.

Who can use the UltraBike?

The kit can be attached to the handlebars of any child or adult’s bicycle. It is only designed for use on a controlled cycle track and not on busy roads or streets. It has great potential for future use in sports and velodromes, as an alternative to tandem cycling.

The kit has already been used by many cycling clubs with visually impaired cyclists, at large cycling events and has even been featured at the Science Museum.

The developers behind the UltraBike, Sound Foresight Technology, are looking to further develop the UltraBike kit this year, to enable it to be adapted for more types of bicycles. They will be holding more events with it in this summer.

Why we like UltraBike

The best bit about the kit is that it’s portable, and allows you to adapt any mainstream bike into an accessible bike, without the need for expensive specialist technology.

We love how it takes the existing technology used in white canes, and puts it to a whole new use. After all, innovation is all about taking old ideas and using them in new and exciting ways!

This blog is for information only. Scope does not endorse this product or service. We try to make sure our information is up to date and accurate at the time of publishing.

To tell us about a Disability Innovation, please email innovation@scope.org.uk