Tag Archives: Work Capability Assessment

Budget 2017 – so near and yet so far

The Chancellor today has announced the second Budget of this year and the first since the General Election. It was a deliberately low-key affair after a turbulent few months for the Government.

In this blog, we take a look at the impact that this will have on disabled people’s lives.

There was a much-needed announcement to Universal Credit which is a step in the right direction for disabled people. The seven-day initial waiting period for processing claims has been scrapped and the repayment period for advance payments has been extended from six months to twelve. Claimants will also be able to get a 100 percent advance now, rather than 50 percent.

However, as our helpline calls demonstrate, we remain concerned there are still fundamental problems with Universal Credit that were not addressed today.

The Government is failing to collect data on the number of disabled people claiming Universal Credit and their experiences. We know from our helpline that many disabled people are worried about what the shift to Universal Credit means for them and the loss of disability premiums means many disabled people will be financially worse off. With disabled people already paying extra costs of £550 a month related to their disability and less likely to have savings we oppose the loss of these premiums.

We need to see urgent reform

The Government has promised to get one million more disabled people into work by 2027. In order for that to happen, we need to see urgent reform to the Work Capability Assessment (WCA) so that it better identifies the barriers disabled people face to finding work.

With the Government expected to publish their response to the Improving Lives Green Paper shortly, we need to see ambitious reforms to support disabled people to find and stay in work. As well as reforming the WCA the Government need to look at what more employers can be doing to support their disabled employees and make sure schemes such as Access to Work are available to everyone who needs them.

Disappointingly the Chancellor did not take the opportunity to confirm that there will be no further cuts to disability benefits in this Parliament. We’d like to see the Government commit to protecting the value of vital payments such as Employment and Support Allowance and Personal Independence Payments.

A missed opportunity

While the announcement of more funding for the NHS was welcome, the Government has failed to act on social care again. The social care system is increasingly under pressure and while the Government has set out plans to consult on social care for older people it’s not clear what they’ll be doing to support the 278,000 disabled people who rely on social care for basic support.

Overall this Budget looks like another missed opportunity to improve the lives of the UK’s 13.3 million disabled people. With action needed to tackle the barriers disabled people face at work, at home and in their communities, we’d like to have seen the Chancellor be bolder.

If you have any questions or concerns about the changes made to your support, please call Scope’s Helpline on 0808 800 3333. 

Visit our website for more information on disability benefits.

How can the next government improve disabled people’s work opportunities?

We want the next government to deliver Everyday Equality with disabled people. It must put the interests of disabled people at the heart of its agenda, and deliver meaningful change over the next five years to tackle the barriers that prevent disabled people from participating fully in society.

One area where disabled people face challenges is employment. We know that many disabled people want to work and are pushing hard to find jobs, but many continue to face huge barriers. Disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people. 

That’s why we  are calling on the next government to improve disabled people’s work opportunities.

Halving the disability employment gap

The latest labour force stats show that 49 per cent of disabled people are in work compared to 80 per cent of non-disabled people. This difference is known as the disability employment gap, which has stood at over 30 percentage points for over a decade.

The recent Green Paper on Work, Health and Disability was a useful opportunity to begin to identify how to tackle the barriers disabled people face to entering, staying and progressing in work. It is vital that the next government builds upon the feedback and ideas shared through this consultation.

Text on infographic reads: Disabled people are almost twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people

A failure to address this is a missed opportunity. Our research shows that a 10 percentage point rise in the employment rate among working-age disabled people would generate £12 billion for the Exchequer by 2030 and see an increase in Gross Domestic Product of £45 billion.

We want the next government to halve the disability employment gap, and set out how it will measure progress towards this goal through public reporting.

Improving support for disabled people both in and out of work

Too often, disabled people who want to work don’t get the right support. This means that disabled people either struggle to move into employment, or else once in work, risk losing their job.

Reform is needed if we are to see a meaningful increase in disability employment.

That’s why we want the next government to improve the support that disabled people receive in and out of work.

This needs to include:

  • Reform of the Work Capability Assessment: The current assessment for out-of-work benefit for disabled people is not fit for purpose. We want to see a new assessment that takes a “real world” approach to identifying the range of employment barriers a disabled person faces, and the support needed to overcome these.
  • End Jobcentre requirements: Some disabled people who don’t meet Jobcentre requirements to prepare or look for work face sanctions. These only make life harder for disabled people, which is why we want to see an end to benefit sanctions.
  • Expand Access to Work: The next government should expand this scheme so that more disabled people can access the specialist support and resources they need to do their jobs and stay in work.
  • Reform of statutory sick pay: We want to see changes to the way sick pay is paid, so that disabled people have more flexibility in managing their impairment or condition whilst at work, or when returning to work after a period of absence.

Providing better employment guidance and support to young disabled people

Too many young disabled people are not getting the guidance and support they need to move into and prepare for work. For instance, in our research with young disabled social care users, 60 per cent of respondents said they are not currently receiving the information and advice they want about employment.

We want the next government to improve the provision of careers advice, work experience, and opportunities for apprenticeships for young disabled people.

Tell us what would help to improve your work opportunities

You can read more about our priorities for the next government and how you can register to vote in this election.

What would help you to find and stay in employment? Email the stories team and tell us your experience – stories@scope.org.uk 

You can also join the conversation on social media by using the hashtag #EverydayEquality.