Tag Archives: World Book Day

World Book Day – “How many characters can you think of that have a disability?”

To celebrate World Book Day yesterday (1 March) , we got in touch with writer and blogger, Emily Davison to talk books. Emily recently graduated with an Masters in Children’s Literature and was keen to tell us about some of her favourite disabled characters in Children’s and Young Adult Literature. 

World Book Day one of my favourite days of the year. Many of you might be dressing up as your favourite storybook character today, but ask yourself this question; how many characters can you think of that have a disability?

Admittedly there is not a huge deal of authentic disabled characters represented in children’s literature, however that certainly doesn’t mean to say that there isn’t any at all. There are a number of authors who have created authentic, relatable and positive disabled characters in their books and today I wanted to acknowledge their efforts.

So, without further ado, let’s begin!

Charlie Ashanti from Lionboy by Zizou Corder

Book cover of LionBoy

The Lionboy trilogy is a series about a young cat-speaking boy Charlie Ashanti who embarks on a journey across the world to rescue his kidnapped scientist parents.  Charlie is an incredibly interesting character alongside being mixed raced and growing up in a bi-cultural background, he also lives with an invisible disability. Charlie has asthma and throughout the series has to deal with the task of managing his health condition, alongside being the hero of story.

The series is an example of a book that features a disabled character without pigeonholing it as the main aspect of the book. Charlie is an empathetic, clever, competent and incredibly brave character and one that no one could help but admire.  This book remains one of my absolute favourite stories.

William Trundle from The Christmasaurus by Tom Fletcher

Christmasaurus

 The Christmasaurus tells the magical story of William Trundle who forges a very special friendship with a dinosaur. As a wheelchair user, William knows what it feels like to be different but that doesn’t stop him from having the journey of a lifetime when he and the Christmasaurus embark on a journey to return to the North Pole.

Tom Fletcher doesn’t scrimp on the important details that come along with being a disabled child, like when William gets bullied for his disability and experiences feelings of isolation or when William can’t use stairs due to his wheelchair. Past all the twinkling lights, singing elves and the magical dinosaur the story tackles serious issues of bullying, loss and overcoming internal ableism.

Linh Cinder from The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer

lunar_chronicles

The Lunar Chronicles is a dystopian fairy-tale centered around the young cyborg mechanic Linh Cinder. Cinder is an amputee, having lost a hand and foot as a result of being caught in a fire accident as a child. However thanks to the advances of future technology, she becomes a cyborg fitted with computerised prosthetic limbs which enable her to regain her mobility.

Alongside her battles against the evil Lunar, Queen Cinder also battles prejudice and discrimination as a Cyborg, something that I as a disabled woman could relate to. Sometimes where disability is concerned especially in the fantasy or sci-fi genre there are more disabled characters than you might imagine, you just need to try looking at it another way.

Vanez Blane from The Saga of Darren Shan by Darren Shan

DarrenShan Saga

Now although Vanez Blane is a minor supporting character in the series, his story is certainly one worth mentioning. Vanez is the robust Games Master of Vampire Mountain, responsible for training the Vampire Generals.

He’s strong, skilled and and a highly respected Vampire in the community. Vanez is also partially sighted, having lost an eye in a fight with a mountain lion .Despite losing his sight, he continues to train the would-be Vampire Generals and can still put up a good fight in any duel!

Ms. Elwyn from Moses Goes to a Concert by Isaac Millman

Moses goes to concert

Moses Goes to a Concert is a fascinating depiction of deafness with its illustrations of sign language and its inclusion of a large cast of deaf characters, including Moses the protagonist. However, the character I want to draw your attention to the Ms. Elywn, a Percussionist who also happens to be deaf. On a visit to a concert she inspires Moses to one day become a percussionist like herself.

Her presence in the book is incredibly empowering to readers and reminds us all not to presume a disabled persons capability.

So those are a few of my favourite disabled characters that I have come across in Children’s Literature. Do you have any to add to my list? Comment below with your favourite disabled characters from literature.

You can see more of Emily’s work on her blog

Encouraging children who struggle with reading

Guest post from Rose-tinted World – a parent of a family affected by Irlen syndrome and dyspraxia. She blogs to raise awareness of these condition and to share information with others affected.

World Book Day is an annual celebration of books and reading. This year World Book Day falls on 7 March. World Book Day offers a great opportunity for children – it allows everyone to find something to enjoy about literature. This seems quite obvious but it is a point worth making. Not every child is a natural reader and all develop as confident readers at their own pace. Some, like my daughter, have to contend with a learning difficulty that makes independent reading more difficult.

How wonderful to have day where everyone can talk about their favourite books and fictional characters. At my children’s school the children are allowed to dress up as their favourite character for the day. This makes all the children equal. Nobody has to read out loud, or show how slowly they read or even say how many books they have read themselves. They only have to share their love of their favourite book with their peers.

We have always read to our children. This proved particularly helpful when my daughter’s problems with reading started. We were able to read her far more complicated books than she could read to herself. This enabled her to listen to chapter books and to develop an understanding of more complex narratives and extended character development. This also allowed her to continue to build on her love of literature.

Come World Book Day two years ago she chose one of the characters from the books we had been reading to her. This was one of the fairies from the ‘Rainbow Fairies’ series of books by Daisy Meadows. She loves these books and has collected many of the series over a number of birthdays.

Son dressed as dinosaurLast year my daughter dressed as the witch from the ‘Worst Witch’ by Jill Murphy. My son dressed a dinosaur from ‘Dinosaurs and all That Rubbish’ by Michael Forman. We also attended the book fair that was put on at the school. My children love this event – All the children love this event and it is always a pleasure to see children so excited by books.

Last year both my children chose books and we went off to meet a friend for dinner. Our friend was running a little late and my daughter took out her book and asked if she could read it. At this point she had only managed to read picture books but I didn’t point this out as she happily held up the chapter book she had chosen. My friend arrived and we started nattering not really noticing how quiet my daughter was being. My daughter read all through our visit with our friend and then went off to her room when we got home. The next morning my daughter announced she had read the book and it was great. I was amazed that she had managed to do this and a bit confused about where this sudden breakthrough had come from. So I asked her how come she had read the whole book and she answered quite simply – because she had picked it up from a shelf that said ‘read it yourself’.

"Read alone" sign

I always remember this moment with warmth. We had had so many struggles in the years before this – fraught home work sessions and frustrated reading practices. We had also had uncertainty about where progress could come from. It made me laugh that my daughter had taken a sign so literally and that this has enabled her to take a massive leap in her own development.

We are always happy when World Book Day comes around. We have always had the belief that the joy of literature can communicate itself and that there are many ways to appreciate books (listening, dressing up, drama etc). We enjoy World Book Day because it gives us the perfect opportunity to remember all of these things.

Find information on World Book Day
Ideas on World Book Day costumes