Tag Archives: Young people

Mental health – “It’s a conversation for everyone”

Abbi was born with a genetic bone disease called osteogenesis imperfecta, also known as ‘OI’ or brittle bones. She also has mental health conditions.

In this blog, she responds to the speech the Prime Minister made at the annual Charity Commission yesterday. The Prime Minister made an announcement of additional support for those in the workplace with mental health issues.

On my ninth birthday, I was given a fluffy, purple, ‘Groovy Chic’ journal. It was one of those lockable ones which came with a set of tiny keys and quickly became one of my most prized possessions. Inside, I kept all my innermost thoughts – lists of my favourite Beanie Babies, ways in which I could become more like my idol, Jacqueline Wilson.

And regular updates on how much I wanted to die.

We need to feel able to talk about mental illness

In her speech at the annual Charity Commission yesterday, Theresa May noted that 50% of adults with mental health problems began to develop their illnesses before the age of 14. If that seems scary, it is. In fact, by the time I was 14, the only thing I detailed in my diary was my food intake and the number of sit-ups I’d done that day. Yet it would be seven more years before I finally received an intensive course of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to treat my anorexia.

Since the days of my fluffy, purple diary, my mental illnesses have cost the government untold amounts of money in hospital admissions, medications and police call-outs. They have had a tangible effect on my performance at school and university and they continue to cause trouble in both my personal and professional life.

As Mrs May identified yesterday, early intervention is both critical to the recovery of those with mental illness, and of great long-term benefit to the economy. If we want to increase the recognition and treatment of mental illness in children and teenagers, then we urgently need to feel able to talk about mental illness ourselves.

Abbi, a young disabled woman, smiles and sits in her wheelchair behind a table

Mental illness isn’t palatable, but it’s a fact of life

When we talk about talking about mental health, we often make a comparison with how we talk about physical health. Whilst that’s not entirely helpful – our societal and medical treatments of physical illness still have a long way to go – it’s nevertheless often easier to discuss most physical illnesses than it is to discuss most mental ones. I’m happy to publicly disclose that I have both, yet even I regularly blame psychological symptoms on my physical conditions. After all, ‘my arthritis has flared up’ sounds a lot more palatable an excuse than, ‘I’m afraid that if I leave the house, the voices in my head will make me throw myself in front of a bus.’

Mental illness isn’t palatable. It’s rarely an easy fix. But it is a fact of life, and when we make it difficult for people to talk about – when we make employees feel uncomfortable disclosing mental illnesses, or brush off symptoms of self-harm as ‘teenage angst’, or refuse to believe that children might be capable of suicide – then we allow those illnesses to flourish.

Closing her lecture yesterday, Mrs May made an important point – ‘Mental health problems are everyone’s problem.’ Mental illness isn’t just a conversation for doctors’ offices and psychiatric hospitals. It’s a conversation for classrooms, and car rides, and water coolers. It’s a conversation for teachers and parents and friends. It’s a conversation for everyone. Join in.

Read Scope’s response to the Prime Minister’s mental health pledge.

For free information and support about disability, please contact Scope’s helpline at helpline@scope.org.uk.

You can also join Scope’s Online Community where you can share experiences, get disability advice and discuss the disability issues that matter to you.

Young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to in their lives

Today we launch Leading my life my way, a new research report looking at young disabled people’s experiences of using support services to live independently.

We carried out this research because we wanted to find out what young disabled people expect from care and support services, what their experiences are and to what extent they are supported in different areas of their lives.

Our research shows that young disabled people don’t have sufficient control over their care and support plans and consequently in major decisions affecting their lives.

With this in mind, we designed our research to ensure young disabled people’s experiences and opinions were at the centre, through a series of face to face and telephone interviews as well as a wider survey of disabled people aged 17 to 30.

Young disabled people want to do all the things that every young adult does. But the social care system is letting them down and holding them back in many crucial areas of their life.  This is leading to social exclusion and affecting young disabled people’s wellbeing.

Support with personal care

While access to support is a significant barrier faced by young disabled people, our research found a much more widespread issue of being able to access to support in other areas like employment. Of respondents to our survey, 60 per cent said they aren’t getting the support they need to get into work.

Decision making

A quarter of our survey respondents said that they are either only ‘slightly’ or ‘not at all’ involved in making decisions relating to their care and support plan. This highlights a worrying lack of choice and control young disabled people have in making decisions about how they live their lives.

Information and advice

Our research also found that information and advice services could be improved to better serve the needs and expectations of young disabled people. While a fifth of our respondents would like to access information and advice on smartphone apps, only one per cent are currently able to.

The impact of poor quality information and advice was clear in interviews we conducted with respondents, with many instances of young disabled people not knowing how or where to access meaningful support in areas such as finding a job, managing support using direct payments and finding the right place to live.

Daily activities

A lack of support beyond daily living activities can result in a negative impact on young disabled people’s wellbeing.

Of the young disabled people we surveyed, a majority had experienced a significant setback in their lives such as not getting a college place or somewhere they wanted to live.

Text reads: Two thirds of respondents have had significant social care setbacks that have stopped them living indpendtly. 82 percenthad to wait at least six months for a solution

Of these people, 82 per cent had not had this resolved within six months, despite this being an obligation of local authorities under the Care Act. Such experiences are resulting in many young disabled people feeling that their lives are on hold while they struggle for resolution in specific areas of their lives.

Our research provides evidence that many young disabled people are not being supported to do the things they want to in their lives.

This is a denial of opportunity resulting in many young disabled people feeling they are being left behind while non-disabled friends and relatives leave home, progress in work, continue in education, play an active role in their communities and develop relationships. If we don’t get social care support right then the huge amount of potential young disabled people have in these areas could be wasted.

The Government needs to look beyond funding support for the ‘basics’ in social care and ensure young disabled people are supported to live independently in all areas of their lives.

Read more about our work to improve social care on our website.

I used to hide my autism from employers, now I see it as a positive – End the Awkward

Felix took part in First Impressions, First Experiences, a pre-employment course for young disabled jobseekers. Since then he’s been working hard to reach his goals and he’s passionate about changing employers’ attitudes towards disability. 

For End the Awkward, Felix talks about how he learned to see disability in a positive light and why employers need to do the same.

Before I joined Scope’s pre-employment programme, I was working for a firm in East London. Unfortunately it didn’t go according to plan and I realised that, while my autism can’t be ignored, it isn’t something that I should be ashamed of.

Now I talk about disability in a positive light

In the past, I wouldn’t have disclosed my autism to potential employers, but Scope’s pre-employment programme taught me how to talk about it in a positive way. Now I do talk about autism and those who I’ve worked with have seen it in a positive light. Instead of just seeing autism as a negative, I’ve shown that there are many positives as well.

I think there are two ways to improve inclusiveness in the workplace. The first thing is for employers to be educated about disability, but another way is for potential candidates, who are disabled, to strike up the confidence to say “This is my condition, this is why I need support”. I’ve also learned to highlight the positives that I can bring to the workplace so that potential employers don’t feel the need to question my abilities.

Employers shouldn’t hide from disability

I read an article about how 49 per cent of companies don’t want to hire someone who has learning difficulties and that affected me because I’m part of that demographic. And unfortunately, it said further on in the article that only 7% of people with learning difficulties are in employment which means that 93% have been forgotten about.

Workplaces can be more autism friendly by being patient when it comes to communication, reinforcing boundaries regarding employee relations, and if there is an incident where the individual is anxious then it would be best to find to out why. They should acknowledge that autistic people have skills and see how those skills could be best utilised by the organisation.

Felix laughing with a friend

Education is key

I discovered that two thirds of the public are still uncomfortable with people with disabilities, and that’s very clear in terms of employment and in terms of social life. There’s a long way to go to improve attitudes and awareness.

I feel like there’s a lack of diversity regarding the public image of disabled people. When people think of a disabled person they usually think of somebody who’s using a wheelchair. But it’s so much more.

People need to be educated about what cerebral palsy is, about what autism is, how they can make adaptations, and so on. Education is key so that employers know how to support that person’s needs. You could have a positive mindset but if the work environment isn’t supportive, it can go downhill from there.

Everybody brings something new to the table

I think that awareness campaigns like End the Awkward can have an impact on employers and on the wider public. Disability is a broad spectrum. Just because someone is disabled, doesn’t automatically mean they can’t do something.

You can’t compare yourself to everybody else. Can you imagine how bland and boring the world would be if everybody was the same? Everybody brings something new to the table. My achievements are a testament to how disability doesn’t have to be a barrier to having a good life. It’s time other people realised that.

You can stay up to date with everything End the Awkward on Twitter and Facebook using #EndTheAwkward or visiting Scope’s End the Awkward webpage.

Dyspraxia and social anxiety: why I’m not hiding anymore – End the Awkward

Guest post by Rosie, who has dyspraxia, which affects her movement, balance and sensory processing. For End the Awkward, she talks about feeling different, her journey to acceptance and how she stopped hiding.

I’ve always been aware of how differently I learnt and how tasks which everyone else found really easy took me so much longer. At the age of 4 I was diagnosed with dyspraxia, an invisible difference which is still very misunderstood. Dyspraxia is thought to be caused by a disruption in the way messages from the brain are transmitted to the body. This affects my ability to perform movements in a coordinated way, balance, motor skills and sensory and emotional sensitivity.

Every person with dyspraxia is affected differently. Even though I’ve always been very determined, I was also very shy and self conscious. I hated being centre of attention and any fuss made feel uncomfortable. I really struggled making friends as everyone was very different to me.

People didn’t understand

The lack of understanding which surrounds dyspraxia didn’t help at all, a lot of people didn’t and still don’t know what it is. I was misunderstood, judged and negative assumptions were made about me. I was called clumsy, careless, stupid, lazy and told that I simply wasn’t trying hard enough.

If you had asked me to describe what dyspraxia was and how it affected me I would have avoided the subject completely. I just didn’t know how to talk about it and was scared that people would run a mile if I disclosed to them. Awful bullying and ignorance at work had left me too anxious to speak, struggling with social anxiety and in a dark place.

Feeling different

A common theme for many dyspraxics is feeling different and struggling to make and maintain friendships. Over the years I’ve beat myself up a lot and wondered why I couldn’t be as socially confident as others, which is an ongoing challenge. I struggle with managing my emotions and can be prone to panic attacks and sensory sensitivity, which means the environment around me can be very overwhelming.

I’ve also spent a lot of my life hiding. Hiding from situations or environments which either triggered my anxiety or where I’ve felt uncomfortable. I concealed my  dyspraxia and social anxiety which lead to me experiencing depression. For ages I thought it was just me being me.

Rosie dressed up for an event

Anxiety was taking over my life

Social anxiety made me feel in constant worry that I was going to embarrass or make an idiot out of myself. I worried that I would have a panic attack, experience sensory overload in public or say something that nobody “gets”and have everyone laugh at me.

Then there’s the constant worry that you’ve done something to upset someone and that people hate you and are simply putting up with you. When you’re anxious your whole body can tense up, you can start feeling sick and you can struggle to give eye contact, which is hard enough when you’re dyspraxic. It was easier to avoid doing anything or going anywhere.

After hitting a very low patch I realised I couldn’t  go on like this. Anxiety was slowly taking over my life, stopping me enjoying the things I loved and leaving me fearful, low and constantly on edge, unable to sleep and with zero confidence and self-esteem. The more anxious I became the more clumsier I was and the more mistakes I was making and the more I beat myself up. It was a vicious circle.

Meeting others helped me stop hiding

I got involved in Dyspraxia Foundation where for the first time I felt like I could be myself. Nobody judged me if I made any mistakes. I met others who were dyspraxic and I didn’t feel so alone. I began to learn about how dyspraxia affected me but also the strengths which dyspraxia can bring, which to me are being caring, creative, able to think outside of the box and I’m a very determined soul.

By spending so much time hiding I wasn’t showing the world all of Rosie and I was missing out on so much. With the support that’s out there, I’ve been able to achieve a degree and a masters degree. I’m also learning strategies to help me cope with day to day life and support my mental health.

Ending the Awkward

I’ve been able to help others by writing blogs and raising awareness, helping them feel less isolated and alone. It’s given me more empathy when supporting students in my job as a learning support assistant. I’m determined that nobody should go through or feel what I have. Learning to be kind to myself is something I’m still working on but I’m fighting my fears one little step at a time.

That’s why I’m getting involved in Scope’s End The Awkward campaign. Disability and difference is nothing to be scared of – we’re human beings with feelings. A little bit of patience, time, and kindness can go a long way. Nobody deserves to be made to feel embarrassed or ashamed of being different. After all, wouldn’t the world be such a boring place if we all were the same? You never know what you might find out when you take the time to get to know someone.

You can stay up to date with everything End the Awkward on Twitter and Facebook using #EndTheAwkward or visiting Scope’s End the Awkward webpage.

To read more from Rosie, visit Rosie’s blog.

The hidden sex lives of disabled people – End the Awkward

Alice is a disability rights activist and journalist. As part of our End the Awkward campaign, she shares her views on the media’s portrayal of sex and disability.

Content note: this blog references offensive disablist language and contains discussions about sex.

Disabled people don’t have sex, do they? It certainly seems that way as our sex lives are so rarely represented in the media, if at all.

Have you ever seen a disabled person having sex in a film, TV program, or a mainstream porno? Me neither.

We are a generation which loves to talk about sex, so why aren’t disabled people part of the conversation? Why are our sex lives are being hidden? And why are we being desexualised? We are consistently portrayed as people who never get our leg over and this couldn’t be further from the truth.

However, things have started to change with Maltesers recent ad campaign. The brand launched three disability-themed adverts which premiered on the opening night of the Paralympic Games, and one in-particular really stood out to me.

A text description of the advert is available at the end of this blog post.

Three women are sat around chatting about sex and one (who is a wheelchair user) talks about getting frisky with her boyfriend who didn’t complain when her hand started spasming! Funnily enough Storme Toolis who plays the part is thought to be the only disabled actor to ever have had a sex scene on UK TV.

It is hard to put into words just how happy I was to see this advert, it reminded me of the conversations I have had with friends leaving them in stitches when sharing my sex stories.

Disability in the bedroom

I have spasms and seizures, and I have them when I’m in bed. This can make sex both awkward and absolutely hilarious, not too different from non-disabled sex right?

In the past I’ve had to explain to a partner that my legs weren’t shaking because I’d had an orgasm – they were going into a spasm.

I’ve also come round from seizures before and not remembered who the person on top of me was. You can’t really get much more awkward then that, especially when you’re in a long term relationship!

Disability certainly keeps sex interesting and there are also some perks. Having so many seizures during sex forces me and my partner to have regular breaks which means it usually lasts much longer then it would without them. And telling people I’m disabled early on is also a great dickhead-filter, especially when online dating. You’d be amazed at how many people have stopped talking to me once they discovered I was disabled, but this has meant I’ve only ever met up with open minded people who I know I can trust to get into bed with.

Having barriers in the bedroom also means disabled people have to be more creative and our sex lives are often far from vanilla, trust me. Look at Scope’s A to Z of sex and disability if you want to find out more!

End the awkward

Maltesers are paving the way to end the awkwardness around sex and disability, but there is a long way to go yet. This is evident from some of the online comments left on the advert such as: “Retards who have sex are disgusting.” And: “I don’t really understand how disabled ‘people’ can be sexual beings without having souls.”

These attitudes need to be challenged, and the best way to do that is for more brands and broadcasters to follow in Maltesers footsteps. The more disabled people’s sex lives are accurately represented, the better perceptions will become. I hope one day I can turn on my TV and see disabled characters (played by disabled actors) having sex and for it not be out of the ordinary.

Beyond the bedroom

But this goes beyond sex, Scope’s 2016 Disability In The Media Study found that 80 percent of disabled people felt underrepresented by TV and the media on the whole.

It seems like this is only addressed for a few weeks every four years when the Paralympics comes around and this needs to change. We are the world’s largest minority group and we need representation every day of the year.

So decision makers, please don’t stop broadcasting about disability just because the games are over, let’s keep it on the box, and while you’re at it why not start representing disabled people’s sex lives too?

Read more End the Awkward blogs, or get involved in the campaign by submitting your awkward story.

Video description: Three women sat outside around a picnic bench. The person telling the story is a wheelchair user and she is holding a bag of Maltesers in her hand. As she tells the story she shakes the bag and chocolates spill over the table. Her friends looked shocked at first but then everyone laughs. Text reads: “Look on the light side”.

I’m not a hipster, I’m epileptic! – End the Awkward

Bekki is 21 and an intern in Scope’s Campaigns team. She studied History at Oxford University, exploring disability and discrimination.

For End the Awkward, Bekki shares her own experiences of awkwardness and explains why there’s no need to hide from disability.

Awkwardness is a natural part of human interaction. However, when it comes to disability, awkward encounters often take on a slightly more negative tone.

Some conditions fall into a grey area between visible and invisible. Like mine, I have photosensitive epilepsy which you might not know just by looking at me. But I do have to use aids, such as specialised sunglasses, in order to go about my everyday life.

On top of this, there’s the stereotypical view that an epileptic seizure is always a convulsive seizure. In fact, there are over 40 different types of seizure which all look very different. This can be alarming and confusing if you aren’t familiar with them.

People often overreact when I have seizures

I have three different types of seizures; convulsive, prolonged partial and partial. Partial seizures happen most often and these are the ones I often encounter problems with.. They occur between ten and twenty times a day and can range from blank staring, to violent head shaking, or my eyes rolling back into my head.

During my more ‘alarming’ seizures, I’ve had people yell “WTF, are you the possessed or something?!” followed by that person rapidly removing themselves from my presence to avoiding assisting me because “I must have done something to deserve it”. I’ve even had religious officials telling me they’ll pray for me or making the sign of the cross at me, so I don’t go to hell.

Rebekka smiles at the camera

I’m not hungover, I’m epileptic!

The more typical responses I get are based on assumptions about why I’m wearing my sunglasses or using a Mac computer. They’re not what traditionally spring to mind when someone thinks of accessibility aids.

Because I wear my sunglasses on overcast days, during the winter months or inside, and can only use Mac computers (due to different pixel technology), I can no longer count the number of times I’ve had to say “I’m not a hipster or hungover, I’m epileptic”.

I’ve even had to avoid wearing hats because of the comments I get and the ease at which people can remove them from my head.

Avoidance really isn’t the answer

There is a reason why priority seating signs on transport and in bathrooms have been changing their disability signs. In the twenty first century we have begun to recognise that there are a range of different access needs and we shouldn’t make assumptions based on traditional representations of disability.

Some people may have never seen a seizure before, but street harassment and avoidance isn’t the answer. This only isolates disabled people further and makes everyone feel awkward about something that can’t be changed. It may look weird to you, but it’s part of my everyday life. And that’s okay. I came to terms with it a long time ago and often laugh about it with family and friends.

Engage with the awkwardness – it’s a fact of life, not a fact of disability. Maybe next time, talk to me instead of comparing me to a demonic entity?

 You can stay up to date with everything End the Awkward on Twitter and Facebook using #EndTheAwkward or visiting Scope’s End the Awkward webpage.

Scope Role Models: we want to End the Awkward before it starts

Today (24 August) we’re launching Scope Role Models, our new education programme aimed at secondary school students aged 11 to 16. In hour-long workshops we’ll work with pupils to help them End the Awkward before it begins and to learn about disability in a friendly and engaging way. 

All of the sessions will be led by a disabled role model who’ll share their story and take part in an ‘Ask Me Anything’ question and answer session to help students tackle stereotypes and misconceptions. 

We’re launching Scope Role Models in response to research that shows that one in five young adults have actually avoided a disabled person and 67 per cent of the British public admit that they feel uncomfortable talking to disabled people.

A classroom of schoolchildren
Richard and Rosemary from Scope’s Campaigns team talk to a busy classroom

We also found that over a quarter of people say that getting advice from disabled people would make them feel more confident talking to or interacting with a disabled person. So we’ve decided to give students an opportunity to do just that – by going into schools and introducing them to a disabled role model.

Role models in the classroom

Mary Russell Great Baddow High
One of our disabled role models, Mary Russell, presenting at a session at Great Baddow High School in Chelmsford

We’ve already been into schools across the country, presenting to over 500 students and have received great feedback from students who have participated in the workshops.

At Gresham’s School in Norfolk we delivered two days of workshops to Year 8 pupils. The pupils engaged positively with the sessions and importantly, it aligned with their curriculum. Many pupils told us that it was the first time they’d learnt about disability, stereotypes and the negative attitudes that sadly still exist.

Kim Quick, Special Projects and Outreach Coordinator at the school, told us:

“We make a point of including the topic of ‘role models’ in our PSHE curriculum and, generally speaking, our pupils are pretty astute at recognising, in theory, the qualities of a role model.

Often, they identify these role models in the media or those having celebrity status, so it was our privilege to welcome Rosemary and the Scope team to our school for the day.

Rosemary is, indeed, the embodiment of a Role Model and shared her infectious capacity to educate our pupils with her openness, sense of humour and set of values. Rosemary broke down the barriers with her honesty, likeability, and respect for our pupils’ initial reluctance to ask her questions.

By the end of the sessions, many of them were quite at ease and it was so wonderful seeing them ask questions that they might not otherwise have felt able to ask. While she was talking, I was watching the faces of our pupils; they were engaged, alert, and definitely in a place of learning.

The sessions we had were worth a thousand theoretical situations in the classroom and I am so grateful to her for coming to school and helping our pupils understand how her motivation for social change has far reaching benefits for the next generation’s attitudes.”

Thank You from Gresham's
Thank you messages from Year 8 pupils at Gresham’s

How you can get involved

We’re excited to get out to other schools across England and Wales and to continue sharing our work with students- but we need your help. If you are connected to a school that would be interested in booking a session, please complete our school bookings enquiry form and we’ll be in touch.

So far we have 10 trained Role Models ready and raring to get out there and be part of the sessions but we’re always on the lookout for more!

If you’re a disabled person and feel you would make an amazing role model for students then please complete this short role models enquiry form and we’ll be in touch.

This Dad turned his disabled daughter into a comic book hero

Dan White is the author of the brilliant Department of Ability comic book, featuring a cast of superheroes whose impairments are their greatest superpower.

In this blog Dan tells us how his daughter Emily was disappointed to find that she there weren’t any superheros that looked like her – so he decided to make his own!

“Born to be different. Born to save the world”

My name is Dan and I am an artist with a beautiful, talented daughter called Emily, who I adore. We are both proud to be part of an incredible community of people.

Emily was born with Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus. This is a condition where the spine does not develop properly, leaving gaps in the spinal cord. When she was younger she was a very impressive bum-shuffler! But around five years ago, we bought Emily her first wheelchair. She loves exploring the world around her, and in her new wheelchair she could introduce herself to all sorts of new exciting things.

Like so many other incredible kids, Emily is blessed with endless amount of curiosity. She is a complete book-worm and absolutely loves learning through books, comics, films and music.

“Something had to change”

Unfortunately, this wonderful curiosity often gave way to frustration, annoyance and bewilderment. Emily always wanted to find characters, icons and images that she could relate to. However, very few made her feel accepted and included. Speaking to other kids, it became clear that they often felt the same.

Soon it became obvious to me that something had to change. I started gnawing on my pencil and, very soon, the ideas started flowing.

Just like Emily I love comics, and I have always enjoyed drawing. Before long I had sharpened my pencil and started developing a new comic that all children would enjoy. I soon realised that it had be about what all children aspire to be: Superheroes!

It is easy to underestimate children. But they are so much more imaginative, accepting and inclusive than adults. This is why I designed my comic for all kids. Because they will be responsible for a future in which people are not discriminated against or side-lined.

Meet the superheroes

With Emily’s help I created a whole world of diverse, unique and accessible heroes. All our heroes are dynamic team-players who use their impairment as their greatest superpower. After a lot of deliberation, we decided to call the comic The Department of Ability.

Several of the characters designed for Department of Ability comic strip
Meet the characters from Department of Ability comic strip

Among the first people to see the images were the charities on Facebook. Strongbones, a  relatively young charity, was the first to respond with real enthusiasm, and gave me the support and backing I needed. They are still very involved with the growth and global adventures of the Department of Ability.

Taking over the world

As soon as we started we had big hopes in the comic/cartoon world. It wasn’t long before our superheroes were taking social media by storm, with just a quick click and a paste on my PC.

Soon after designing the characters I gave up my day-job to become a full-time artist so that the Department of Ability could keep growing. The characters became more and more popular, from Australia, through India, to America. It is clear that Emily’s vision and insight have struck a chord with people all over the world.

It’s a Marvel!

At this point we knew everyone loved the characters, but we still had to design and produce the comic. I knew this would be a 24-hour job, but with the help of a literary agent (a real life wonder woman), it started taking shape.

She even showed the drawings to Stan Lee of Marvel, one of the most influential, brilliant and creative figures in the whole industry. He loved the idea, and now we are looking to work with him. I couldn’t believe it. It is one of my childhood fantasies realized.

The disabled community is a hub of amazing talent, from artists to dancers, to film makers to musicians. It is time they were all able to share and showcase their brilliance.

To infinity and beyond

Right now it couldn’t be a more exciting time for the comic. Strongbones threw an enormous party for us at Hamleys in June and The Guardian broke the news of Stan’s possible involvement. Since then Emily and I have appeared on The Saturday Show, CBBC Newsround, ITV Lunchtime News, and BBC Radio. There has even been some film interest from overseas and discussions with Merlin entertainment. I might even be working with one of the world’s leading comic book writers to finish the first adventure.

I could never have imagined our idea and vision would appeal to so many people. But it seems attitudes and prejudices are finally changing. Inclusion is coming!

Or, in the words of the Department of Ability: Born to be different, born to save the world.

Visit the Department of Ability website to read the comic strips. Alternatively, you can find out more on Facebook and on Twitter.

Want to see more characters disabled children can identify with? We would love to hear your thoughts. Leave a comment below to share your ideas.

My daughter was thrown out of a pub for being disabled

Last weekend, after celebrating Brighton Pride, Jenny’s daughter Charlie was asked to leave a pub because she is disabled. Jenny chose to share their experience in a post on Facebook and the response has been amazing, with messages of support coming from hundreds of people. The post has now been shared over 1000 times, as well as in the media.

In this blog Jenny shares her story, why she felt she needed to write it, and why raising awareness of invisible disabilities is so important to her.

My 19-year-old daughter Charlie has two chromosome abnormalities and is a bit of an enigma. On the one hand, she is very innocent, child-like and can’t read or write but, on the other hand, she has a great vocabulary and wants to be a teenager, just like other young people her age. She will never be able to do things on her own because she is vulnerable and unaware of consequences. Anyone who has met Charlie will know that she is one of the sweetest people you could ever wish to meet.

On Sunday night, Charlie was thrown out of a pub in Brighton – for being disabled. There was only one other customer in the pub as everyone else was sitting outside on the benches. As we were being served, I suddenly noticed that Charlie was crouching quietly on the floor with her hands over her ears. She said it was because a sudden burst of loud music had startled her. The barman said she would have to leave.

I was shocked and explained that she was disabled, that the music had temporarily scared her but that she was okay now. He insisted that she was not welcome no matter how calmly I tried to explain why this was wrong. We had no option but to do as they asked.

Why I chose to share our experience

This was the first time I’d written about something like this. Brighton is quite an inclusive place and Charlie and I are quite well known. We’ve never really had much experience of negativity. When we were told to leave the pub, I tried my best to explain why it wasn’t acceptable in a calm, friendly manner, but they were just completely dismissive. They said “Right you’ve had your say, now you have to leave”. I was frustrated and sad, more than angry, about the injustice of it.

It affected Charlie very badly. She was devastated. She said she wanted to die, she said that she didn’t want to be disabled. She just thought everybody hated her. And I thought people don’t hate her, people really, really like her. So I just wanted to put it out there because it was so unfair and I thought people who knew Charlie would be able to say “Well Charlie’s lovely” because she is.

Headshot of Jenny and her daughter Charlie smiling with the sea in the background
Jenny and Charlie smiling for the camera

The response has been amazing

I just thought it would be shared among my friends so it’s very strange now that it’s been shared 1000 times! Charlie’s had so many amazing comments from lots of people, those who know her and people who are feeling the indignation on her behalf.

Charlie can’t read or write and never will be able to, but I’ve been able to read out the comments that people have left. It was amazing to get those supportive messages. And what has been particularly uplifting but also sad, is to see that so many other people have had similar experiences, all over. Not just in pubs but with the general public.

I want to raise awareness of invisible disabilities

Things like this do seem to happen more with invisible disabilities than physical disabilities. As I said in my Facebook post, at the pub I asked if he’d discriminate against a wheelchair user and he said “Of course not” and I said “Well what’s the difference?”.

Life can be very difficult. For instance, this morning, although Charlie is 19 and a half, I’ve had to shower her, wash her hair, make all her food and drink. I’ve had to rescue the microwave twice. Sometimes it’s exhausting and to have to also cope with unnecessary discrimination as well, it’s so completely unfair. Why shouldn’t a disabled person be able to live their life the way they want, just like any non-disabled person?

If this is a chance to stop this happening again, I’m going to do all I can

Charlie smiling at the cameraQuite a few people have said that this might set a precedent, which would be wonderful. Hopefully invisible disabilities will be recognised and accepted in the same way that visible ones would be. I hope people like Charlie and other disabled people, don’t have to go through this again. It would be wonderful to think they can just live their lives without anyone discriminating against them.

Making people aware is a hugely positive thing. I’m not somebody who would normally go out and ‘sell ourselves’ but if this is a chance to make sure something like this doesn’t happen again, I’m going to do all I can. Because that’s the only way change is going to happen.

You can read Jenny’s full post here. If you have a story you would like to share, get in touch with Scope’s Stories team.

Update

The Mash Tun pub have investigated this incident and the staff member involved has been dismissed from their job. The Mash Tun are now working with the disability organisation Enable Me to improve the way they treat their disabled customers. Jenny has also released a new statement on Facebook about what happened. 

 

My role on Holby City helps change attitudes about autism – Jules

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This story is part of 30 Under 30.

 

Jules is an actor and a regular on Holby City. He also happens to have Asperger syndrome, which is a form of autism.

As part of 30 Under 30, we chatted to him about acting, attitudes and how Access All Areas helped him break into the industry.

My love of acting came from watching a lot of Steve Martin movies which made me feel really good. I also loved going to the theatre and the cinema. I watched lots of films and always thought I’d like to do something like that. Acting made me feel good about myself. I think that really inspired me.

I did a course through Access All Areas, who also now act as my agent. I made some good friends during that time and it was a really good experience because it helped my acting. I improved so much. It meant I could get to the next level.

Landing a role on Holby City

I got an audition thanks to Access All Areas who also now act as my agent. I was fabulous (as always!) and I passed the audition with flying colours. It was very challenging at the beginning because I was walking into something completely new. As the months went on I became comfortable and settled in well and I actually really like it now. I think I’ve come a long way in the last year. I always jump out of bed with enthusiasm, even though I’m leaving at half 6 in the morning.

I play Jason Haynes. He has a different type of Asperger’s to myself. I think he’s a lot geekier than I am. He’s a very nice man but he lacks confidence. I feel like I’m playing a completely different person. That’s why it’s interesting. It’s really fun on set with the cast and crew. It’s a long day but it’s good. I always feel very proud of myself at the end of the day. I feel like I’ve tried my best and done a good job. I like that lots of parents with autistic children have enjoyed it. It’s a great thing that I’ve been able to do.

Jules, a young disabled man, plays a character smiling and lying in a hospital bed on Holby City

I hope attitudes in the industry get better

There was a point where I was very frustrated with the industry because I was seeing all these films that had a character with autism and it was so often played by a neuro-typical person. In Rain Man and Black Balloon, for example, the actors in those two films don’t have the condition. It’s frustrating that directors and producers don’t do enough research because there are people out there with the conditions that can play these parts.

It’s important for disabled actors to play disabled characters, and I think they can play characters who don’t have a condition too. I want the industry to be a little bit more understanding and to not ignore autistic talent like it has done for far too long. I would say it’s improving now but it could get a lot better.

I think it’s really good that shows like Holby City are starting to look into diversity more. When I first started I saw one negative comment on Facebook, someone who followed the show who didn’t understand Asperger’s. But everyone else has been really supportive.

It’s great to have role models

Steve Martin, John Travolta and Morgan Freeman are some of my favourite actors, and Kevin Spacey, Tim Robbins, Jeff Bridges – I’ve got lots. Jim Carrey as well. All these people make me so excited to be an actor and it’s really great to have these role models because I happen to think that actors and comedians are the best people in the world.

I hope that I’m seen as a role model. I hope that I’m encouraging people with other conditions or people who are on the spectrum and have autism or mild learning difficulties. If they watch me on Holby City I hope I’m showing them that it can happen for them and they shouldn’t lose faith and hope. I’m sure they can do it if they put their mind to it.

I think that I’ve done a good job at making people more aware of autism and making it relevant in the acting world. I’m showing that if people with autism want to do this kind of work they can, and it’s not impossible.

My advice for other young disabled actors

Keep a positive frame of mind and try your best. Of course there will be hard times but you’ll get through it. Try your very best to get where you want to go. Sometimes it doesn’t work out the way you want but maybe it just takes time.

Holby City has been the highlight of my career. It’s a very rewarding job and I’m hoping that it will lead to other work in the future. It’s been my first big break really. I’d love to do movies here and in America, more TV and theatre. I’d like to do a whole variety of things.

Jules is sharing his story as part of 30 Under 30. We are releasing one story a day throughout June from disabled people under 30 who are doing extraordinary things. Keep up to date with all of our new stories on our 30 under 30 page.